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  • Monarch Butterflies

    Monarch Migration Underway Across Ohio

    Eastern monarch butterflies are now flying through Ohio on their way from summer breeding areas to overwintering sites in Mexico. Monarchs may travel 50 to 100 miles per day, making this one of the most impressive migrations in the animal kingdom.
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  • #2
    There is a section of border fence the "Tree Huggers" are raising cane about. Seems the fence passes through a known Monarch butterfly "rest area" on their migration route.
    In the meantime, hundreds of thousands of Monarch butterflies are smeared across windshields and grills in south Texas!

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    • #3
      New York DEC gives out free envelopes of milkweed seed every year at the State Fair, milkweed being the only plant that monarchs will lay their eggs on. Apparently there's a shortage of it around here, but we've plenty in the clearings and edges on our land, and there's always plenty growing along the state land roads. (I suppose some of that along the roads could be from people scattering their free seeds from the State Fair.)

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      • #4
        Jimbo, just what is the flying speed of a Monarch do you suppose ? What ever it is, just imagine covering up to 100 miles a day !! That is a remarkable achievement to say the least. I would imagine a good tail wind would help, but just how much hinderance would be imposed by head winds !?!? I have noticed fewer and fewer Monarchs in Michigan the past few years.

        I have seen photos of migrating Monarchs that have been so clustered on branches of trees during their wintering areas, that they actually bend the branches down. Does a Monarch weigh even an ounce ? Good post jimbo.
        Last edited by bowhunter75richard; 09-15-2022, 01:45 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MattM37 View Post
          New York DEC gives out free envelopes of milkweed seed every year at the State Fair, milkweed being the only plant that monarchs will lay their eggs on. Apparently there's a shortage of it around here, but we've plenty in the clearings and edges on our land, and there's always plenty growing along the state land roads. (I suppose some of that along the roads could be from people scattering their free seeds from the State Fair.)
          Every year, my dill cones back as "volunteer".
          EVERY year, those stupid butterfly's maggots (I mean larva!) try to eat my dill! 😡
          If I want dill, I have to go pick them off!

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          • #6
            More info. 100 miles a day must be a strong tail wind
            https://www.bing.com/search?q=how+fa...30550c6c1d48e4

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            • #7
              A lady friend is a over the road truck driver and she sees the Monach's on their migration.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post

                Every year, my dill cones back as "volunteer".
                EVERY year, those stupid butterfly's maggots (I mean larva!) try to eat my dill! 😡
                If I want dill, I have to go pick them off!
                Interesting! I mean, pain in the butt for you, but interesting they use the dill. A lot of reliable sources say milkweed is the monarch's only known host plant. Maybe the larvae head out looking for other goodies once they're done on the milkweed?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by MattM37 View Post
                  New York DEC gives out free envelopes of milkweed seed every year at the State Fair, milkweed being the only plant that monarchs will lay their eggs on. Apparently there's a shortage of it around here, but we've plenty in the clearings and edges on our land, and there's always plenty growing along the state land roads. (I suppose some of that along the roads could be from people scattering their free seeds from the State Fair.)
                  I’ve felt a little guilty about mowing the fields down in late summer, there had been a huge patch of milkweed right in front of the house but it’s getting smaller every year along with the ragweed and other crap I don’t want growing.


                  I wonder how much Giant Hogweed factors into this. That stuff may be worse than Japanese Knotweed the way it’s taking over.

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                  • #10
                    If it is the dangerous Hogweed, don't get it in your eyes. Causes blindness. Check what kind you have.

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