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  • Marijuana legalization.

    Study shows a 5.8% increase in automobile accidents in states where marijuana has been legalized.
    Also shows a 4.1% increase in traffic fatalities in those same states.

    https://www.eurekalert.org/news-rele...retail%20sales.

  • #2
    It's fascinating that here in NY, we just spent twenty years making legal and social improvements regarding tobacco but suddenly we're supposed to accept marijuana as a good thing? Why is marijuana so socially acceptable when tobacco smokers are now outcasts? Is it "more okay" because it gets you high? And another interesting thing: Up until a few years ago, there was plenty of medical science saying that weed was no less carcinogenic, and possibly worse, than tobacco smoke. Now, there's not a peep about that in mainstream newsmedia or general conversation. I'm sure articles and studies can be found if one goes looking, but I'm sure now there are plenty more citing (or "suggesting") how much healthier weed smoke is. Funny how that works.

    I'm a non-user of both tobacco and marijuana but I've always disliked the way tobacco-smoking became such a political thing. By all means, we should have passed the ban on indoor, public-place smoking long before we did, and minimum age requirements should be strictly enforced -- but that's all that ever needed to be done. The percentage of people smoking was steadily decreasing year by year already, just on the basis of what we all learn in middle-school health class. Courteous smokers don't deserve to be treated like second-class citizens, especially while weed-smoking is now supposed to be okay with everyone.

    Of course the big thing is, a lot of communities are now making money with their growing and their hip little downtown weed shops. I can't blame struggling farmers, especially dairy farmers who really get the shaft here in New York, but other community "leaders" have shown what total whores they are on the issue. Throw in the college communities where faculty and administration have as much sway as any of the elected officials, and it's please pass the bong, the votes have been pretty near unanimous.

    (Another thing that's probably only worrisome to outdoorsmen: Hemp and weed don't benefit deer and gamebirds the way alfalfa, wheat, and corn do. A lot of our critters in areas like this are going to find a lot less food, come one of these years in the not-too-distant future.)

    Comment


    • #3
      ‘Weed’ like any other drug, was for years attempted to be unlawful. Why it is now so accepted and legalized is simple, just follow the money ! When government learned there was profit to be made, poof went the unlawfulness. Nothing like the smell of money to make evil disappear ! Let government smell an easy profit and all is good, no matter the consequences. Who said government is not interested in our wellbeing !?!?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by MattM37 View Post
        It's fascinating that here in NY, we just spent twenty years making legal and social improvements regarding tobacco but suddenly we're supposed to accept marijuana as a good thing? Why is marijuana so socially acceptable when tobacco smokers are now outcasts? Is it "more okay" because it gets you high? And another interesting thing: Up until a few years ago, there was plenty of medical science saying that weed was no less carcinogenic, and possibly worse, than tobacco smoke. Now, there's not a peep about that in mainstream newsmedia or general conversation. I'm sure articles and studies can be found if one goes looking, but I'm sure now there are plenty more citing (or "suggesting") how much healthier weed smoke is. Funny how that works.

        I'm a non-user of both tobacco and marijuana but I've always disliked the way tobacco-smoking became such a political thing. By all means, we should have passed the ban on indoor, public-place smoking long before we did, and minimum age requirements should be strictly enforced -- but that's all that ever needed to be done. The percentage of people smoking was steadily decreasing year by year already, just on the basis of what we all learn in middle-school health class. Courteous smokers don't deserve to be treated like second-class citizens, especially while weed-smoking is now supposed to be okay with everyone.

        Of course the big thing is, a lot of communities are now making money with their growing and their hip little downtown weed shops. I can't blame struggling farmers, especially dairy farmers who really get the shaft here in New York, but other community "leaders" have shown what total whores they are on the issue. Throw in the college communities where faculty and administration have as much sway as any of the elected officials, and it's please pass the bong, the votes have been pretty near unanimous.

        (Another thing that's probably only worrisome to outdoorsmen: Hemp and weed don't benefit deer and gamebirds the way alfalfa, wheat, and corn do. A lot of our critters in areas like this are going to find a lot less food, come one of these years in the not-too-distant future.)
        Keep the population high and they won't care what the politicians do.

        Part of the reason there is a labor shortage is a majority of applicants can't pass the pee test.
        A friend works for the DOT and they have a severe shortage of drivers because the new generation are druggies.

        What about the e cigarettes? I can't stand the smell and people think they can smoke them anywhere.



        Hemp and weed growing is going to be devastating to wildlife.

        Weed is more profitable than corn. What are the waterfowl going to eat at Montezuma NWR when weed is surrounding it?

        A solar farm is being placed on private land I rabbit hunt. Goodbye 🐇
        Last edited by Danbo; 07-19-2022, 07:55 PM.

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        • #5
          As a kid in high school, "Mary Jane" was around but rare.
          I encountered it a few times, but avoided it like the plague.
          As I got older (mid 20's), it became more and more common. Mostly hippies and returning Nam vets.
          About '76 or '77, I thought, "I'm gonna try it."
          A buddy got caught with some that pretty much cost him everything.
          Job, reputation and police record.

          So I tried it! Several times.
          By the time the stuff kicked in, I was "GONE"! The party was over!
          With beer/alcohol, I could sorta "control" the inebriation level.
          Not only that, in the 70's, a DWI was bad enough, but drug possession was a HUGE no-no!
          So I walked away from the stuff and never looked back!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by PigHunter
            Never smoked it and probably never will. (I've got my own vices in alcohol, chocolate, and chasing women ) But I'm close to some who do. What they want to do with their lives is their own business and the government should stay out of the way.
            pighunter, I can give you names of guys I worked with that spent their last days drooling into a pillow....all because of marijuana.
            I can also give you names of guys I worked with that alcohol killed.

            I can also give you the names of two guys who murdered their significant others over affairs. One of them was a Texas DPS trooper. Sad situation. The guy she was with, knew who she was. He picked her up, drunk, at a local "dive" and took her home. The husband came out and shot her.

            Comment


            • #7
              As I understand:

              1. Alcohol is extremely addictive and erodes your life, often cutting life expectancy of users by about 50%. It dulls the senses and has caused a high number of automobile fatalities.

              2. Tobacco smoking causes cancer and cuts life expectancy of users by about 30%. The smoke can cause similar effects in bystanders so most indoor smoking has been terminated except for in thousands of American homes.

              3. Marajuana is not addictive nor is it carcinogenic. It is available in gummy form but it can be smoked if desired, without near the risk to human lungs. It has similar recreational effect as the above.

              All these can be detrimental if not used with moderation and common sense. If I were to ban any, I would work down the list from the top. Alcohol is ludicrous, tobacco is ridiculous and weed is not good but probably not as harmful as Coca-Cola.

              I suspect that if we were to allow the American public to grow their own weed with a good selection of well defined seeds and ensure that gummies comply with FDA standards, most of the risk and crime associated with it would be eliminated. Government access control and syndicated crime are the main risks with weed.
              Last edited by DakotaMan; 07-22-2022, 10:38 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                https://www.cdc.gov/marijuana/health...ts/cancer.html

                If it's not addicting why do people go through withdrawals if they don't get it every day?

                Comment


                • #9
                  [QUOTE=Danbo; ... If it's not addicting why do people go through withdrawals if they don't get it every day?[/QUOTE]

                  Danbo, my personal (unscientific) belief is that anything that is FUN is somewhat addictive, especially if it something you ingest (e.g. bacon, eggs, steak). I personally even had a hard time quitting backgammon at lunch time.

                  The article you referenced is a bit sketchy in that it is shallow and weak in scientific analysis. It is also from the "Federal Gubment" who has a tendency to tell us what they want us to hear rather than telling us the truth or of their lack of knowledge. The article is weak regarding the real therapeutic benefits of THC that are commonly understood by many Americans. It has proven to be more beneficial than most other medications and treatments with several common mental disorders. It has proven (not in published Gubment publications, but by Americans) to aid in depression, bi-polar disorder, anxiety, etc. This is being born out in states that have already legalized it. It has become a common practice for patients to travel to legalized states to obtain their medication and it is worth it. Many are doing so with full knowledge and "unofficial" agreement of their physicians (wink, wink).

                  I am close to numerous psychiatrists who are forlorn that they can only prescribe what is approved by the CDC rather than what works. I've seen the amazingly beneficial effect on numerous patients. They typically use the "gummy" form of the medication to avoid the harmful effects of smoke in their lungs. At this point, there are many permutations of THC scientifically produced to treat what ails you.

                  I'm from a generation that considered weed to be a dangerous drug like meth, heroin, cocaine, etc., however I've seen it's use for decades and don't consider it to be nearly as dangerous as smoking and alcohol which of course are legal.

                  I'm not encouraging anyone to experiment with drugs but I do recognize the medical value of THC even though it seems to be ignored or at least downplayed by some politicians.

                  Last edited by DakotaMan; 07-23-2022, 11:04 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I am not too sure DakotaMan that there are those who are critical of the medicinal benefits of Marajuana, but it appears to be a far cry from the now accepted recreational use of ‘weed’ ! There are several drugs, or medicines that are health related or beneficial but not used for general enjoyment. Does not recreational use cross the line of medical benefits ? When weed is used as a prescribed medicine it is less objectionable.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'm with you bhr.
                      I believe that legalizing marijuana for "medical use" was just a baby step to legalizing marijuana for "recreational use".
                      If marijuana was that beneficial, why haven't pharmaceutical companies jumped all over it for making medicinal goods?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post

                        Danbo, my personal (unscientific) belief is that anything that is FUN is somewhat addictive, especially if it something you ingest (e.g. bacon, eggs, steak). I personally even had a hard time quitting backgammon at lunch time.

                        The article you referenced is a bit sketchy in that it is shallow and weak in scientific analysis. It is also from the "Federal Gubment" who has a tendency to tell us what they want us to hear rather than telling us the truth or of their lack of knowledge. The article is weak regarding the real therapeutic benefits of THC that are commonly understood by many Americans. It has proven to be more beneficial than most other medications and treatments with several common mental disorders. It has proven (not in published Gubment publications, but by Americans) to aid in depression, bi-polar disorder, anxiety, etc. This is being born out in states that have already legalized it. It has become a common practice for patients to travel to legalized states to obtain their medication and it is worth it. Many are doing so with full knowledge and "unofficial" agreement of their physicians (wink, wink).

                        I am close to numerous psychiatrists who are forlorn that they can only prescribe what is approved by the CDC rather than what works. I've seen the amazingly beneficial effect on numerous patients. They typically use the "gummy" form of the medication to avoid the harmful effects of smoke in their lungs. At this point, there are many permutations of THC scientifically produced to treat what ails you.

                        I'm from a generation that considered weed to be a dangerous drug like meth, heroin, cocaine, etc., however I've seen it's use for decades and don't consider it to be nearly as dangerous as smoking and alcohol which of course are legal.

                        I'm not encouraging anyone to experiment with drugs but I do recognize the medical value of THC even though it seems to be ignored or at least downplayed by some politicians.


                        I could care less what people do with their own bodies. If you want to bring out your inner cheech and Chong go for it but don't tell me smoking that shit is heathy or not addicting.


                        I deal with it at work every day and they are a detriment to society.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          [QUOTE=Danboe: ... I deal with it at work every day and they are a detriment to society.[/QUOTE]

                          I guess we are talking about degree of badness. I appreciate your observations from real life Danbo. Do you also deal with alcohol and tobacco related issues? Do you have a perspective regarding which is more evil? Do you think tobacco, alcohol and pot should all be illegal? Do you feel that alcohol and smoking should be legal while pot should be illegal?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post

                            I guess we are talking about degree of badness. I appreciate your observations from real life Danbo. Do you also deal with alcohol and tobacco related issues? Do you have a perspective regarding which is more evil? Do you think tobacco, alcohol and pot should all be illegal? Do you feel that alcohol and smoking should be legal while pot should be illegal?

                            Yes I deal with alcohol and smoking also at work.
                            However smoking cigarettes doesn't change a person's attitude and competence and is done outside on breaks. ( no comparison)
                            Alcohol is done outside of work. If they smell like Alcohol they are terminated.

                            I believe alcohol is just as bad as dope .
                            I encourage people not to use any of it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Marijuana users have always packed their bowls with plenty of romance, earthy sentiment, and not a little bullspit about its effects or not on your health. We can thank the hippies for that. But to put it in one simple way: A regular guy having a beer or two after work doesn't get drunk, while a regular guy smoking a joint, or even sharing a joint, does get high. No problem when he's on his own time and in his own space and nobody else is depending on him or his having his faculties, but that's the kicker right there. For want of a better term, day-drinking is much less a problem than I believe day-weedsmoking is going to be.

                              Spend time long-term with people and families where marijuana is commonly used and you see a clear decline in intelligence and motivation, attention to duties and obligations, and last but not least, cleanliness and caring about other health matters like good nutrition and exercise.

                              Alcohol can be much worse but applies more often to individual cases. Alcohol has more of a track record as a factor in extreme situations (ex. an alcohol-fueled domestic abuse incident), but again, same thing, depends on individual cases. In terms of general human ability and quality of life, long-term weed use at the very least cannot be said to be "better" than alcohol. It's better than meth and heroin, but there's not so much "long-term" in meth and heroin equations.

                              Still and all, I'm pretty libertarian about moderate use of the non-opioid, non-crystal substances. At times I've seen the destruction of immoderate use, but in the overall ideological sense I think we suffer more from agenda-driven government decisions and politicized or moralistic social norms.
                              Last edited by MattM37; 07-25-2022, 02:59 PM.

                              Comment

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