Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

MichiganSchool Shooting

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • FirstBubba
    replied
    Originally posted by crm3006 View Post
    From jhjimbo: "They know they can not enforce gun storage, however, if a child gets a gun that should be locked the parents will b e charged - as they shuld be"
    Click image for larger version

Name:	Change my mind.jpg
Views:	35
Size:	77.3 KB
ID:	786780
    .
    LMBO! Yes sir! The one that let Brooks off in Minneapolis needs to be "No.1" on the list. ....a very LOONNNGGGG list.

    ....and the ones who donate to those bail funding sites should also be charged. That would include VP K. Harris!

    Leave a comment:


  • labrador12
    replied
    Beautiful!

    Let's GO Branden!!

    Leave a comment:


  • crm3006
    replied
    From jhjimbo: "They know they can not enforce gun storage, however, if a child gets a gun that should be locked the parents will b e charged - as they shuld be"
    Click image for larger version

Name:	Change my mind.jpg
Views:	35
Size:	77.3 KB
ID:	786780
    .

    Leave a comment:


  • crm3006
    replied
    From #1 Bubba: "From the time my 2 could walk, they saw "the guns"."

    Yep. Mine too. Once my four year old son told my brother "My daddy's guns are always loaded, and you leave them alone!"

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    Originally posted by crm3006 View Post
    As the scripture teaches, "Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it." (Prov. 22:6 KJV)
    Teach your children about guns from the time they can start listening to you, and you won't have to worry about a gun being locked up, or a child getting hold of it.
    From the time my 2 could walk, they saw "the guns".
    If one EVER asked about a gun, we went to the "gun room".
    They selected the gun
    They could hold, touch, ask any question

    By the time the youngest was 10, disassembly and reassembly of a S&W revolver was a piece of cake.

    Both kids qualify as marksmen.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Originally posted by fitch270 View Post

    It’s a maximum $250 fine. Not exactly a huge deterrent.
    I think they charged them with involuntary manslaughter.

    Leave a comment:


  • crm3006
    replied
    As the scripture teaches, "Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it." (Prov. 22:6 KJV)
    Teach your children about guns from the time they can start listening to you, and you won't have to worry about a gun being locked up, or a child getting hold of it.

    Leave a comment:


  • fitch270
    replied
    Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post

    They know they can not enforce gun storage, however, if a child gets a gun that should be locked the parents will b e charged - as they shuld be
    .
    It’s a maximum $250 fine. Not exactly a huge deterrent.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
    Yep, the problem with storage laws is enforcement.

    New York has a storage law when there are minors living in the house. I don’t know all the particulars but I believe there’s an exception during “an open hunting season”. Duh, some animals are unprotected and open year round.

    I bought a safe when the kids started having friends and cousins over. Out of sight, out of mind. It’s handy when we’re away as well.
    They know they can not enforce gun storage, however, if a child gets a gun that should be locked the parents will b e charged - as they shuld be
    .

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Originally posted by bowhunter75richard View Post
    Reading the posts with favorable info regarding the attributes of safes for protection of valuables is certainly true. But, they certainly do not serve the purpose of owning a gun for home protection when the ‘needed’ protection is not available when ‘needed’ !! Either that or we must become much more convincing in our attempt to talk a house invader into waiting until we unlock our gun safe in order to defend ourselves !
    Thrtr sre safes that open with fingerprints - no lock.

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    In reading CRM’s post, I could have written it with the exact same words. I did not become a teenager until the early 50’s and was around and involved with guns at the age of four. The ways things have changed since then is a travesty, not only in the use of guns, but mostly in peoples thoughts of them, which to the none users, is fear ! And, as is usually the case, many things people do not understand, or even know, they tend to fear, or have misthoughts (sp) of. The things that have changed in my years, are the saddest part of growing old.

    Leave a comment:


  • crm3006
    replied
    Just a few thoughts. I grew up in a house, actually two houses, where guns were kept out in the open, ready for use. My Father's Browning Sweet 16 went into the gun rack in his pickup in the fall, didn't come out until spring, usually. My Grandfather's model 62 Winchester was the first gun I ever shot, at the age of five. The H&R .410 Suitcase Gun was mine, and I was supposed to keep it ready, with shells, (not loaded, but ready), in case of a varmint or snake getting into the chicken house, night or day. This started about the time I was six.
    Guns were tools, and as such, mostly taken for granted. If not in a truck, or a saddle scabbard, or carried in hand, they resided in the gun rack in my Grandfather's bedroom. My Father's old WWII 98 Mauser mostly rode in the pickup, in case of coyotes. Guns were there, in case of need.
    I have no idea how many squirrels, rabbits, and bullfrogs my Grandfather, Father and later, me, put on the table with that Winchester .22. There is no way to determine how many quail, doves, ducks and geese we ate, that fell to my Father's 16 gauge, or my Grandfather's old 12 gauge double. We ate what they shot, and were glad to have it.
    Now, I have a few more guns, and a gun safe. I don't have a safe because of children, or laws, or silly government regulations. I have a safe because the times have changed, and thieves and thugs prowl the streets at will, much like the snakes and varmints we dispatched with my little .410 back on the ranch.
    A gun safe allows me to lock guns and other valuables up, and feel slightly more secure when leaving home for a weekend, or longer. However, the old saying about "a lock is only something to keep an honest man honest", holds true to a gun safe, also. They are a tool, used to secure things, and as such can be broken, misused, or even broken into. Nor do I keep everything in the safe. As has been pointed out previously, a burglar or door kicker isn't going to wait for me to open a safe, and load a weapon. There are a couple or three stashed around the house, discreet, but handy, in case of need. I hope I never need them.

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    Reading the posts with favorable info regarding the attributes of safes for protection of valuables is certainly true. But, they certainly do not serve the purpose of owning a gun for home protection when the ‘needed’ protection is not available when ‘needed’ !! Either that or we must become much more convincing in our attempt to talk a house invader into waiting until we unlock our gun safe in order to defend ourselves !

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
    Yep, the problem with storage laws is enforcement.

    New York has a storage law when there are minors living in the house. I don’t know all the particulars but I believe there’s an exception during “an open hunting season”. Duh, some animals are unprotected and open year round.

    I bought a safe when the kids started having friends and cousins over. Out of sight, out of mind. It’s handy when we’re away as well.
    Gun safes have only become popular, available and more common in the last 20 years or so.
    My youngest just sold a small safe and bought a larger safe.....and it's nearly full! LOL!

    Safes also became more popular with home invasions and burglaries. Our safe is also fire rated at 1200° for 45 minutes.
    Not only a secure place to keep guns, but family artifacts and important documents. Not that a safe WILL save property, but increases the chances for survival.
    I can't imagine NOT having a safe in today's world.

    Leave a comment:


  • fitch270
    replied
    Yep, the problem with storage laws is enforcement.

    New York has a storage law when there are minors living in the house. I don’t know all the particulars but I believe there’s an exception during “an open hunting season”. Duh, some animals are unprotected and open year round.

    I bought a safe when the kids started having friends and cousins over. Out of sight, out of mind. It’s handy when we’re away as well.

    Leave a comment:

Welcome!

Collapse

Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

Right Rail 1

Collapse

Top Active Users

Collapse

There are no top active users.

Right Rail 2

Collapse

Latest Topics

Collapse

Right Rail 3

Collapse

Footer Ad

Collapse
Working...
X