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MichiganSchool Shooting

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  • #16
    "Today's standards among the smug elite aren't realistic." Couldn't agree more, but I think it'll be fairly cut and dried whether they had a red flag and were negligent when they should have done something to prevent the shooting. Maybe I'm a dreamer, but there's Rittenhouse, plus today's ruling that the gun makers and distributors aren't liable for the Las Vegas shootings .... I think the parents should pay if they really were negligent, and I don't think it will come down to anti-gun politics.

    I guess we'll see ....
    Last edited by MattM37; 12-03-2021, 05:52 PM.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Danbo View Post
      The 1950s were great.
      That all depends on your point of view! LOL! 😉
      I was born in 1950. Yeppers, as a kid growing up, it was grand.
      One CHRISTmas, my parents bought a basket, put oranges and apples in it and I walked all over the neighborhood, selling fruit. Didn't make much, but at 5 years old, I didn't need much! LOL!
      Pop didn't have but 2 guns. Until we moved out into the country, I didn't even realize there was a third gun and it was mine. (.410)
      They hung in a gun rack in mom & dad's bedroom. I had to ask to get my hands on one. ...and those times were far and few between.
      Pop hunted, grandpa hunted, when I turned 6, I started hunting. Just natural progression.
      In the 1st grade (1957), we got to bring our CHRISTmas gifts to school. Pop and me made absolutely certain their were no BB's in my Crosman BB gun. Mrs. Imogene Marshman was totally nonplussed at the sight. It stayed by my desk all day.

      On a "down" note, the 60's kinda sucked for an aspiring gun shooter/trader/lover to realize all the good stuff died in the 60's!
      Pre '64 Winchesters. The demise of the Win M12. The GCA '68. Form 4473.
      At 12, Lawrence Spence at Babcock Bros showed me a brand spanking new Win M70 "Featherweight". I didn't have the wherewithal or a means of acquiring it. Alas!

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      • #18
        I hear you Matt. I would be even more flabbergasted than I am now to think that the parents suspected their son was a school shooter and bought him a gun for Christmas. Satan walks among us big time if that is true.

        Let's GO Brandon!!!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post

          The purchase was legal.

          Over seas I would ride in a horse drawn carriage or taxi from time to time. The practice was, you had your fee in your hand and if in an accident, throw the money on the seat and take off. The demented archaic thinking of this backward Country is, if you did not hire the ride, the accident would not have happened.
          Often if a white guy is at the scene of an accident, people try to charge him money, because he has lots, or as a crowd develops it might change to he caused the accident, even if just in a taxi, crowds can become a mob, and people can get hurt.

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          • #20
            It appears there’s plenty of blame to go around on this one. The warning signs were there, neither the parents or the school would take responsibility. The authorities should have been called before anyone stepped out of that meeting. The parents failed in looking out for their son, the school leadership failed in looking out for the students and employees.


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            • #21
              Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
              It appears there’s plenty of blame to go around on this one. The warning signs were there, neither the parents or the school would take responsibility. The authorities should have been called before anyone stepped out of that meeting. The parents failed in looking out for their son, the school leadership failed in looking out for the students and employees.

              There is just no excusing some folks!
              The lights are on but nobody's home!

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              • #22
                How about gun storage safes when children are in the house. There are models that open quickly based on finger print or combination. Plus, mandate ammo be kept seperate from firearm. Instructions to young people might also help plus better recognition of those with mental plroblems. I believe there were red flags in MI but they weree ignored.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
                  How about gun storage safes when children are in the house. There are models that open quickly based on finger print or combination. Plus, mandate ammo be kept seperate from firearm. Instructions to young people might also help plus better recognition of those with mental plroblems. I believe there were red flags in MI but they weree ignored.
                  I lived in a house with no gun safe , I didn’t need it to understand if it wasn’t mine don’t touch it ! Guns were all over my house 4 kids and no problems . A gun safe doesn’t help poor parenting , they are your children keep an eye out because being a parent is a 24/7 job. Trouble today everyone is so sensitive !

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Pmacc60 View Post

                    I lived in a house with no gun safe , I didn’t need it to understand if it wasn’t mine don’t touch it ! Guns were all over my house 4 kids and no problems . A gun safe doesn’t help poor parenting , they are your children keep an eye out because being a parent is a 24/7 job. Trouble today everyone is so sensitive !
                    Yes sir!

                    In today's economy, not everybody can afford a safe.
                    The ONLY way that obedience of storage laws can be insured is enforcers to enter your home.
                    I dont know about the rest of y'all, but I didn't bleed, sweat and curse to raise this house from the dust just to let a bunch of "gummint" thugs come in and tell me what I'm doing wrong.

                    My kids grew up with a house full of guns.....and no safe! The "safe" was dad's closet.
                    They are both LEO's.

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                    • #25
                      Yep, the problem with storage laws is enforcement.

                      New York has a storage law when there are minors living in the house. I don’t know all the particulars but I believe there’s an exception during “an open hunting season”. Duh, some animals are unprotected and open year round.

                      I bought a safe when the kids started having friends and cousins over. Out of sight, out of mind. It’s handy when we’re away as well.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
                        Yep, the problem with storage laws is enforcement.

                        New York has a storage law when there are minors living in the house. I don’t know all the particulars but I believe there’s an exception during “an open hunting season”. Duh, some animals are unprotected and open year round.

                        I bought a safe when the kids started having friends and cousins over. Out of sight, out of mind. It’s handy when we’re away as well.
                        Gun safes have only become popular, available and more common in the last 20 years or so.
                        My youngest just sold a small safe and bought a larger safe.....and it's nearly full! LOL!

                        Safes also became more popular with home invasions and burglaries. Our safe is also fire rated at 1200° for 45 minutes.
                        Not only a secure place to keep guns, but family artifacts and important documents. Not that a safe WILL save property, but increases the chances for survival.
                        I can't imagine NOT having a safe in today's world.

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                        • #27
                          Reading the posts with favorable info regarding the attributes of safes for protection of valuables is certainly true. But, they certainly do not serve the purpose of owning a gun for home protection when the ‘needed’ protection is not available when ‘needed’ !! Either that or we must become much more convincing in our attempt to talk a house invader into waiting until we unlock our gun safe in order to defend ourselves !

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                          • #28
                            Just a few thoughts. I grew up in a house, actually two houses, where guns were kept out in the open, ready for use. My Father's Browning Sweet 16 went into the gun rack in his pickup in the fall, didn't come out until spring, usually. My Grandfather's model 62 Winchester was the first gun I ever shot, at the age of five. The H&R .410 Suitcase Gun was mine, and I was supposed to keep it ready, with shells, (not loaded, but ready), in case of a varmint or snake getting into the chicken house, night or day. This started about the time I was six.
                            Guns were tools, and as such, mostly taken for granted. If not in a truck, or a saddle scabbard, or carried in hand, they resided in the gun rack in my Grandfather's bedroom. My Father's old WWII 98 Mauser mostly rode in the pickup, in case of coyotes. Guns were there, in case of need.
                            I have no idea how many squirrels, rabbits, and bullfrogs my Grandfather, Father and later, me, put on the table with that Winchester .22. There is no way to determine how many quail, doves, ducks and geese we ate, that fell to my Father's 16 gauge, or my Grandfather's old 12 gauge double. We ate what they shot, and were glad to have it.
                            Now, I have a few more guns, and a gun safe. I don't have a safe because of children, or laws, or silly government regulations. I have a safe because the times have changed, and thieves and thugs prowl the streets at will, much like the snakes and varmints we dispatched with my little .410 back on the ranch.
                            A gun safe allows me to lock guns and other valuables up, and feel slightly more secure when leaving home for a weekend, or longer. However, the old saying about "a lock is only something to keep an honest man honest", holds true to a gun safe, also. They are a tool, used to secure things, and as such can be broken, misused, or even broken into. Nor do I keep everything in the safe. As has been pointed out previously, a burglar or door kicker isn't going to wait for me to open a safe, and load a weapon. There are a couple or three stashed around the house, discreet, but handy, in case of need. I hope I never need them.

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                            • #29
                              In reading CRM’s post, I could have written it with the exact same words. I did not become a teenager until the early 50’s and was around and involved with guns at the age of four. The ways things have changed since then is a travesty, not only in the use of guns, but mostly in peoples thoughts of them, which to the none users, is fear ! And, as is usually the case, many things people do not understand, or even know, they tend to fear, or have misthoughts (sp) of. The things that have changed in my years, are the saddest part of growing old.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by bowhunter75richard View Post
                                Reading the posts with favorable info regarding the attributes of safes for protection of valuables is certainly true. But, they certainly do not serve the purpose of owning a gun for home protection when the ‘needed’ protection is not available when ‘needed’ !! Either that or we must become much more convincing in our attempt to talk a house invader into waiting until we unlock our gun safe in order to defend ourselves !
                                Thrtr sre safes that open with fingerprints - no lock.

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