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Ammo andComponents Hard to Get

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  • #16
    Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
    I’m not playing the hoarding game but have been picking up stuff when I find it priced reasonable to build and maintain inventory of what we will or possibly might actually use. Not prepping exactly but trying to be able to do what we want when we want.

    For example a buddy of the Kid’s invited him goose hunting last weekend if he could find steel shot. Not something we’ve ever bought. Couldn’t come up with any so he didn’t go. The group killed 70 geese, had a fantastic hunt. Next time I see steel shot available I’m picking up a couple boxes. You just never know.
    Several years back, a turkey hunting buddy left a box of 3" steel 12 gauge ammo.
    I don't shoot 3" OR steel. I finally shot it up just to get rid of it. 😖
    Last edited by FirstBubba; 09-14-2021, 03:02 PM.

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    • #17
      Reloading is still a option. Availability of powder and primers will improve over time. Start saving your brass for any caliber you would consider reloading.
      Thinking about it ? Get the book ABC's of reloading and read it cover to cover. Amazon has it very reasonable. As I mentioned, if you have an experienced mentor that is a great way to go. Watch his process and the equipment he uses. Note: be sure he is a 'by the book' type of guy. You don't want someone who thinks he knows it all and deviates from the manual.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
        Reloading is still a option. Availability of powder and primers will improve over time. Start saving your brass for any caliber you would consider reloading.
        Thinking about it ? Get the book ABC's of reloading and read it cover to cover. Amazon has it very reasonable. As I mentioned, if you have an experienced mentor that is a great way to go. Watch his process and the equipment he uses. Note: be sure he is a 'by the book' type of guy. You don't want someone who thinks he knows it all and deviates from the manual.
        All good advice Jim, also there are you tube videos and DVD’s that really bring you up to speed on how to set up and start loading . There are also advanced videos for neck turning , annealing etc, makes the whole process les mysterious ! Only one thing that I don’t quite agree with , I value my time and gladly use it to hand load . I feel a greater connection to my shooting because of my time spent on the loading bench .

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Pmacc60 View Post

          All good advice Jim, also there are you tube videos and DVD’s that really bring you up to speed on how to set up and start loading . There are also advanced videos for neck turning , annealing etc, makes the whole process les mysterious ! Only one thing that I don’t quite agree with , I value my time and gladly use it to hand load . I feel a greater connection to my shooting because of my time spent on the loading bench .
          i check length of brass every time and trim if necessary. Also chamfer the mouth in and out. Never have annealed brass in my life. I usually have .001" to .002 " bullet hold and that seems enough.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Milldawg View Post
            Have been toying with idea of rolling my own for my 25-06 but after checking into components I gave up.
            Reloading gear and components have gone up in price like crazy but so has ammunition and gun parts in general. The key factors in the decision depend on how much you need superb accuracy (e.g. plugging one deer a year does not require accuracy), and how much you want to shoot. I like to shoot a LOT and I like superb accuracy on all my rifles; even my hunting rifles. This allows me to hit where I am aiming and to extend my predictable shooting to a longer range.

            In order to get started, I'd suggest considering used equipment. Most reloading tools never wear out. There are thousands of dollars worth of special tools and the marketing for them makes it sound like you really need them. Some are useful if you do 100 yard bench rest shooting but few are necessary; especially for hunting.

            You could get a used press, balance beam powder measure, a little 2-piece Lee case trimmer, and a set of dies and be on your way. Powder ( one pound of H-4831 or IMR 4831), bullets (100g Hornady Interlock and 75g Vmax) and primers (large rifle) are hard to find but if you search online, you will find some eventually. You don't even need a reloading manual because you can find numerous quality load data sites online or I can give you load data to start you off. There are lots of good youtube videos on the process and I'd be happy to mentor you if you like.

            I enjoy reloading and it undoubtedly lets you get the most out of your rifle; especially the 25-06 because you can then use the many different sizes of bullets it supports. Right now, you are pretty much limited to 100g or 120g bullets at your local store. You will likely never find 75g-90g bullets.

            My press and most of my tools are over 50 years old and still work fine. I view the acquisition of these reloading tools as moving me up to a higher standard of shooting and a baseline that allows me to add other cartridges, powders, and loads at a much lower cost throughout my life.


            Last edited by DakotaMan; 09-15-2021, 10:30 AM.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post

              The Mfg visited, secret location, said they allocate and send orders all over hoping to keep everyone in business.

              Just finished the last in a F&S series of long range shooting - how to make the long range 1,000 shot. He said he presses the trigger, I have always, on any firearm, squeezed the trigger. Which is preferred ? My ground hog hunting buddy squeezes the trigger and the back of the trigger guard and does real well with that technique.
              On a pistol team we always squeezed the trigger.
              A consistent and smooth trigger pull is critical to long range shooting (1000 yards and beyond). I use a 1.5 ounce trigger on most of my varmint or competition rifles. I keep my trigger finger on the side of the trigger guard until I am ready to shoot. I move my finger to the side of the trigger so I know where it is located. I then move my finger to the front of the trigger. As my point of aim centers on the target, I move my finger straight back until it touches the trigger. I often hear the shot even before I feel the trigger. For hunting applications I normally use a heavier trigger pull for safety; I move my finger straight back slowly, not knowing when it will go off.

              Comment


              • #22
                I agree with Dakota on the above except for one thing. I would not develop all kinds of loads and bullets for one rifle/caliber. If you do, sight or scope adjustments will drive you crazy when you go from one to another. I did that early on and soon found it was hard to work with so many different bullets which results in different POI. Now I stick with a couple of bullets and loads, and for some rifles only ONE bullet and load. Keeps life a lot simpler. JMO

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post

                  Reloading gear and components have gone up in price like crazy but so has ammunition and gun parts in general. The key factors in the decision depend on how much you need superb accuracy (e.g. plugging one deer a year does not require accuracy), and how much you want to shoot. I like to shoot a LOT and I like superb accuracy on all my rifles; even my hunting rifles. This allows me to hit where I am aiming and to extend my predictable shooting to a longer range.

                  In order to get started, I'd suggest considering used equipment. Most reloading tools never wear out. There are thousands of dollars worth of special tools and the marketing for them makes it sound like you really need them. Some are useful if you do 100 yard bench rest shooting but few are necessary; especially for hunting.

                  You could get a used press, balance beam powder measure, a little 2-piece Lee case trimmer, and a set of dies and be on your way. Powder ( one pound of H-4831 or IMR 4831), bullets (100g Hornady Interlock and 75g Vmax) and primers (large rifle) are hard to find but if you search online, you will find some eventually. You don't even need a reloading manual because you can find numerous quality load data sites online or I can give you load data to start you off. There are lots of good youtube videos on the process and I'd be happy to mentor you if you like.

                  I enjoy reloading and it undoubtedly lets you get the most out of your rifle; especially the 25-06 because you can then use the many different sizes of bullets it supports. Right now, you are pretty much limited to 100g or 120g bullets at your local store. You will likely never find 75g-90g bullets.

                  My press and most of my tools are over 50 years old and still work fine. I view the acquisition of these reloading tools as moving me up to a higher standard of shooting and a baseline that allows me to add other cartridges, powders, and loads at a much lower cost throughout my life.

                  Good advice Fitch !

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Pmacc60 View Post

                    Good advice Fitch !
                    That was Dakotaman but as someone who recently did just what he recommended I absolutely have to agree as well.

                    It can be done, the only thing I’d add is not to be in a hurry getting things together. Rushing is definitely a bad habit to get into with this stuff.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by fitch270 View Post

                      That was Dakotaman but as someone who recently did just what he recommended I absolutely have to agree as well.

                      It can be done, the only thing I’d add is not to be in a hurry getting things together. Rushing is definitely a bad habit to get into with this stuff.
                      Very true , slow and steady reduces mistakes and needless money spent !

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I want to shoot the guns with ammo, as I need to practice fundamentals, but also stay in shape for reading conditions, plus I like shooting stuff.
                        I get the components I want in volume, when it is there to get, just like I did 3 years ago, 5 years ago or 10 years ago.
                        I typically will develop one load for a given gun.
                        Sometimes I have developed loads for more than one bullet out of necessity or a change of mind.
                        If I need to pay more to get something I want, and I have the disposable funds to do so, I will buy it.
                        Most of my guns have have scopes with turrets that are easy to slip/zero, so changing loads is not a big deal, plus I get more trigger time in.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Pmacc60 View Post

                          I got home last night from the hospital , got a wheel chair here and am trying to become independent ! Lol I can’t stand sitting here watching TV. Hopefully I can use either arm or leg here shortly and do something constructive. Right now I’m living through you guys vicariously !
                          Did you have to have surgery ?

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post

                            Did you have to have surgery ?
                            No Jim , the breaks are clean and the hip will heel on its own but it can’t bare weight for 4 to six weeks. Shoulder is broken but not displaced so in three weeks they are going to check that it’s healing correctly and make a decision then on operating .

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Pmacc60 View Post

                              No Jim , the breaks are clean and the hip will heel on its own but it can’t bare weight for 4 to six weeks. Shoulder is broken but not displaced so in three weeks they are going to check that it’s healing correctly and make a decision then on operating .
                              THAT sounds good pmacc60!
                              I'll be praying that all breaks are mending well when you go back.
                              Surgery is a real "pain"! (pun intended! LOL!)

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Pmacc60 View Post

                                No Jim , the breaks are clean and the hip will heel on its own but it can’t bare weight for 4 to six weeks. Shoulder is broken but not displaced so in three weeks they are going to check that it’s healing correctly and make a decision then on operating .
                                On joints I have injured over the years I never went to a Hospital. I did move affected parts a little at a time - stopped with any pain. Every injury healed on it's own and I have no Arthritis in the area. Not recommending it, jsut what I have done years past. One fall did not heal perfect. I slipped on black ice on a small bridge while hunting in the Adirondacks. I had a high dollar, $5k, rifle and held it up so it would not hit the ground. It hit the ground but my hand was under it and broke my little finger. I could not get it set for several days and by that time too late. Had surgery but the best the guy could do has it in a curve. Good part is it fits perfectly around a can of beer.

                                Comment

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