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  • Done for the season

    Well gentlemen my season came to a end Friday when I fell from a ladder and broke my shoulder and hip. I’m laying in a hospital bed waiting to here what the next course of action. I used a clients ladder that broke and sent me to the ground braking my right hip and right shoulder. Overall it could be worse but no shooting and hunting this year !

  • #2
    Ouch! Hate to hear it. Hope you have a speedy recovery!
    Last edited by Milldawg; 09-12-2021, 07:28 PM.

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    • #3
      Sincere regrets about your accident, and thankful that it was not worse.

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      • #4
        Condolences and prayers my friend.

        Make sure not to ignore any signs of head trauma. My dad took a fall off a ladder a couple years back, he thought he was fine but about two weeks later started having a headache that kept getting worse. Mom finally got him to go to the ER after he started walking into things, scan showed he had several brain bleeds. They got him fixed up ok eventually but it took awhile for him to get back to normal.

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        • #5
          Pmacc60

          OUCH! 🤬😟

          From previous experience!
          (left hip implant, right shoulder implant)

          First and foremost.
          DO WHAT YOU THINK IS RIGHT!!!!
          Second!
          What I'm telling you is just "my" opinion. I'm NOT a medical "expert"!

          If they offer a prosthetic hip, TAKE IT!

          The younger you have the replacement, the easier it is to recover.....and less likely you'll have to suffer through hip surgery again.
          If you're young and healthy, hip replacement surgery recovery is a breeze.

          Shoulder surgery: This is not as easy a choice.
          If you damaged the shoulder joint, it will deteriorate over time. Whether you have it replaced or not depends on how quickly it deteriorates.
          I dislocated mine playing football in highschool when I was 16. I was 68 (52 years later!) when I finally had to have it replaced due to the pain.

          In the meanwhile, bummer on the ladder wreck, dude!
          Good luck on a quick recovery.

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          • #6
            As we age we hope to see a plateau in our increasing loss of physical function. I'm not seeing it. It appears to be downhill all the way as I say Good-by to my 70th year. I am trying to avoid falling off ladders and the like, but randomness occurs. Get well soon, I hope you can enter a period of less bodily stress soon. Ya gadda keep trying though. I say that as I sit in Alaska waiting for the water to go down in the Thorne River. 5 or 10 years ago I would be charging out into the river in these conditions, hoping the water won't top my waders. Not today.

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            • #7
              Sorry to hear that. You sound young so hopefully you will heal quickly.
              I know a lot of people that have fallen and medical talent seems to fix them up quite well.
              My father was building a truck terminal and fell off the roof. Did somethng to his neck. Finally went to Lehay Clinic who, at the time, was one of few doing neck surgery. Fixed him up perfect. He did have to go back as stitches had to come out. That was in the'50's. Flew to Boston in a DC-3, the Gooney Bird.

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              • #8
                Best wishes for a fast and complete recovery.

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                • #9
                  I have a 76 year old friend who got hit on the head by a backhoe bucket this past Wednesday. The operator was swinging around and didn't see him until too late. The tough old bird was knocked down and almost out so he decided to call it a day. Didn't go to the hospital or doctor's office. Seems to be ok.

                  Lost a co-worker a few years ago who fell from his house while cleaning gutters. Lost another when a trailer ramp swung down and clipped him in the head. He was helping to unload a dozer hired to clear the land for his planned retirement home.

                  I try to be as safe working at home as I would at an industrial job site. It's way too easy for things to suddenly turn sideways. Clearing fields at the hunting lease yesterday, I wore hard-toed boots, safety glasses, and thick leather gloves. My head's always on a swivel as I work around equipment. Held the ladder for a club member to climb as we put out No Trespassing signs on trees.

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                  • #10
                    We have members on this site who take pride in riding motorcycles without a helmet and driving pickup trucks without a seat belt.
                    When your number's up, your number's up, I guess:-))

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                    • #11
                      That sounds like a really bad fall Pmacc. You've had a heck of a year if memory serves me right. That's gotta be a long recovery. None the less wishing you a fast mend.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by PigHunter View Post
                        I have a 76 year old friend who got hit on the head by a backhoe bucket this past Wednesday. The operator was swinging around and didn't see him until too late. The tough old bird was knocked down and almost out so he decided to call it a day. Didn't go to the hospital or doctor's office. Seems to be ok.

                        Lost a co-worker a few years ago who fell from his house while cleaning gutters. Lost another when a trailer ramp swung down and clipped him in the head. He was helping to unload a dozer hired to clear the land for his planned retirement home.

                        I try to be as safe working at home as I would at an industrial job site. It's way too easy for things to suddenly turn sideways. Clearing fields at the hunting lease yesterday, I wore hard-toed boots, safety glasses, and thick leather gloves. My head's always on a swivel as I work around equipment. Held the ladder for a club member to climb as we put out No Trespassing signs on trees.
                        I have been given a hard time because I don’t rush into things and not think about what I am doing. Partly for safety and I want take 5 minutes and see if I can figure an easier way to do it. Work smart not hard.

                        I also still have all of my fingers and toes after 25 years as a mechanic of diesel heavy and industrial equipment.

                        I for example don’t mess with chain saws.
                        Never had a need for it and have never been shown properly. And I know several people that have been hurt by them. So being the bread winner I have to think long term. Cordless sawzall will do what I need.

                        And this is a prime example of why I hate ladders at home and at work.

                        im the first guy to destroy a ladder that is defective and unsafe at work. Got in trouble once for destroying a 16 foot aframe for a massive crack by the foot.

                        calmy explained to the maintenance manager that the ladder was definitely cheaper than paying for an injury and accompanying lawsuit that would follow if someone got hurt.

                        changed his tune didn’t care if one of us got hurt but sure cared about the company getting sued. I tendered my resignation a month later.

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                        • #13
                          There are enough other people looking to do us harm, it is not necessary to help them out Pmacc ! Sure hope you make a quick and full recovery........and be nicer to yourself afterwards....okay ?

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                          • #14
                            I hear ya Milldawg. My Dad is a retired heavy equipment mechanic. At 87 he's fortunate to still have all fingers and toes as well as vision. He's had a broken ankle, broken cheekbone, and a shoulder joint replacement. Recently he had to have a knee repaired. I remember him sometimes coming home with beat up hands and his eyes bloodshot from welding. Don't know how many times he's lost fingernails from injuries. He's been one of the toughest men I know and stills insists on helping mow the lawn.

                            Dad partnered with a couple of guys to own two log trucks. The three had full-time jobs but did logging on Saturdays for extra money. I started helping at 9 years old and into college. After getting my engineering degree and married, I decided part-time logging wasn't worth the risk of injury. My day job was what my wife and I depended on. It was very hard telling Dad and my brothers that I would no longer do that with them.

                            I had few close calls while logging. The one that sticks in my mind occurred beside a two-lane road. We had the log truck parked parallel, just a few feet away. Dad was running the winch/ loading boom, one of the partners was running the chain saw, my brother was snaking cable, and I was on the truck to position the logs. We used tongs and would try to hook at the log's balance point. Well, the position was slightly off on that 16-ft pine and it was heavy on the smaller end. I managed to man-handle the low side toward the cab on top of the other logs as my Dad worked the boom and cable. But the log caught and suddenly swung into me there at the high, thicker end. I was about to be flung off and into the road! On instinct, I wrapped my arms around and swung into space. My added weight tilted the balance and I slowly came down to gently land, standing on the pavement. Fortunately, there were no cars passing at the time.

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                            • #15
                              I think any of us who work around machines or other dangerous situations can recall any number of near misses or even bad deals that could have been much worse, even when care was being taken.

                              Since reading this earlier today I’ve been thinking on it but hadn’t wanted to put Pmacc on the spot. Since you guys have mentioned other stories I’ll throw it out there, I just don’t want to come across as being critical. I’m more concerned with his recovery.

                              The original post mentioned using his clients ladder. I’m guessing Pmacc brought it up because he knew better and is beating himself up over that decision. Truth is most of us do stuff like that more often than we should. Milldawg makes a great point about taking a couple minutes to think things through, it’s advice we all know but don’t always follow.

                              The reason I’m mentioning it is because hunting seasons are on us, it’s a sobering reminder to use our heads. Between gun handling and tree stands there’s a lot that can go bad in a hurry. Like the Sargent in “Hill Street Blues” used to say, Let’s be careful out there.


                              Pmacc, please keep us up on the prognosis and recovery.

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