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  • Keepsakes

    Other than the obvious mounts and such, what have you kept for keepsakes over the years?

    I have my dad's old pocketknife, the blade honed down to almost nothing. And the hunting vest he wore way back in the 40s and 50s when he was still hunting. It's too small for me, my dad was a pretty slight-of-build guy, but I've worn it a couple times underneath my regular hunting vest.

    Along with the tag, antlers, and empty of my first deer, I have a chunk of the slug itself, found when I was butchering him. I have a muskrat jawbone I found in my favorite river a few years back -- also some perfectly white polished musselshells found that same day. I sometimes take home some small stones from streambeds if they're colorful or interesting -- I have a couple shelves of them, along with those musselshells and a few other shells. Not much interest in the geology of it all, I just think they look cool, and can serve as a good memento of a good day. Or something, at least, to take home on a bad day.

    This past fall I lost my last remaining lure from my childhood years. That's still bugging me. If the floods this spring didn't carry off the log it was snagged on, I can probably get it back when the waters go down this summer.


  • #2
    I've got my grandfather's Model 12. My dad hunted with it as long as I knew him. My grandfather died before I was born so I never knew him but that gun has killed ducks in front of me as long as I have been alive. My grandfather bought it used in the 1920s and it still puts meast on the table. Nice tool. Too bad so many people disdain firearms as a tool and a artifact.

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    • #3
      I've got way more "stuff" than I care to admit.
      My dad's P.S. Olt duck call and his last hunting license.
      My grandpa's fishing reel I gave him for his birthday 50 years ago.
      The 16 gauge "Elsie" my great uncle gave me when I was 3 or 4 years old.
      The dominoe set that graced our hunting camp from the time it was built (1955) until we lost the lease in 1983.
      The turkey vest my turkey hunting buddy gave me 15 years ago. Still in real good shape.
      The turkey box call my dad made by hand some 60 odd years ago. It sounds really bad, but best I can remember, he never hunted turkey in his entire life. He just wanted to make a turkey call.
      My grandpa's tackle box. My dad's tackle box.
      I've got guns from both my dad and grandpa.

      Lot's of good memories.

      Worst of all, the items that were so dear to me that I've broken, lost, misplaced, forgotten, etc over the years. 😥

      Comment


      • #4
        Click image for larger version  Name:	5ECDC014-8220-486B-8968-76F922F967CA.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	2.50 MB ID:	771628 Click image for larger version  Name:	0FBCCC53-BCB5-48CE-9C23-DED6B714A272.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	2.81 MB ID:	771629 Click image for larger version  Name:	876FE614-E277-468C-92D4-4668C93E5390.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	3.73 MB ID:	771630
        Great question Matt.

        My avatar was taken in Alaska in 2008, my son was 4 years old at the time and I had no idea what to bring back for him. Standing in the river one day it hit me to pick out a bunch of cool looking stones around my feet. That turned into a regular thing from not only my trips but also from his as well. As far as I know he still has all of them, kept in labeled ziplock storage containers. They stack nice.

        Knives are probably a given for many of us. In this picture are two kitchen/butcher knives that belonged to my grandfather who died in 1949. The top one has a cobbed up handle that appears to be oak held on with copper rivets. It’s stamped “Victor” on the end of the blade. No doubt in my mind it was salvaged due to a depression era mind set. The other is well used. I get these out on occasion when hacking out venison steaks just to honor a man my mother wasn’t old enough to remember. I also ended up with a compass that was his, long since demagnetized but still cool.

        The bottom Chicago Cutlery knife I found here on the farm cleaning out an old woodshed back around 2002. I’m pretty sure it belonged to a relative who passed in the late 80’s. It cleaned up pretty well considering it was on a dirt floor of a three sided building for at least 15 years. I use that one occasionally as well but it’s not a locker so you have to be very careful with it.

        Bunch of other stuff as well but these things are extra special because of the mystery that comes with them.
        Last edited by fitch270; 05-11-2021, 09:03 PM.

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        • #5
          I have old stuff not considered keepsakes. So I won't list them.

          Keepsakes related to the Outdoors:
          > Dad's squirrel rifle, a Winchester Model 74 in .22lr

          Click image for larger version  Name:	Winchester Model 74 with Weaver K4.jpg Views:	0 Size:	293.1 KB ID:	771656

          > Two pocket knives my ex-wife gave me, used to field dress deer and pigs. The top is a Parker with 2-3/4 inch Damascus blade. The bottom is a Benchmade ACFK with 4 inch ATS-34 blade.

          Click image for larger version  Name:	Parker Damacus lockback.jpg Views:	0 Size:	45.2 KB ID:	771658

          Click image for larger version  Name:	Benchmade AFCK.jpg Views:	0 Size:	148.9 KB ID:	771657

          > My first canoe paddle from the late 70's
          > My SCUBA diving fins, purchased in 1980
          > A well used 1973 edition of the Sierra Club's 'Hiker's Guide to the Smokies'
          > Photographs taken while on adventures
          > My original orange hunting vest

          Other keepsakes:
          > Mom's rocking chair used while I was a baby. No doubt, breast feeding many many times there while rocking me to sleep. It's here right now in my office. (I blame her for my fascination with boobs).

          > My grandfather's Bible
          > My grandfather-in-law's railroad pry bar
          > The bunk beds I slept in from ages 8 to 14 and later my son used
          > A quilt made by my grandmother
          Last edited by PigHunter; 05-12-2021, 12:28 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
            Click image for larger version Name:	5ECDC014-8220-486B-8968-76F922F967CA.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	2.50 MB ID:	771628 Click image for larger version Name:	0FBCCC53-BCB5-48CE-9C23-DED6B714A272.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	2.81 MB ID:	771629 Click image for larger version Name:	876FE614-E277-468C-92D4-4668C93E5390.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	3.73 MB ID:	771630
            Great question Matt.

            My avatar was taken in Alaska in 2008, my son was 4 years old at the time and I had no idea what to bring back for him. Standing in the river one day it hit me to pick out a bunch of cool looking stones around my feet. That turned into a regular thing from not only my trips but also from his as well. As far as I know he still has all of them, kept in labeled ziplock storage containers. They stack nice.

            Knives are probably a given for many of us. In this picture are two kitchen/butcher knives that belonged to my grandfather who died in 1949. The top one has a cobbed up handle that appears to be oak held on with copper rivets. It’s stamped “Victor” on the end of the blade. No doubt in my mind it was salvaged due to a depression era mind set. The other is well used. I get these out on occasion when hacking out venison steaks just to honor a man my mother wasn’t old enough to remember. I also ended up with a compass that was his, long since demagnetized but still cool.

            The bottom Chicago Cutlery knife I found here on the farm cleaning out an old woodshed back around 2002. I’m pretty sure it belonged to a relative who passed in the late 80’s. It cleaned up pretty well considering it was on a dirt floor of a three sided building for at least 15 years. I use that one occasionally as well but it’s not a locker so you have to be very careful with it.

            Bunch of other stuff as well but these things are extra special because of the mystery that comes with them.
            I know what you mean about the mysteries. We're often finding stuff near the old house and barn foundations on the family land -- three or four generations of the family lived there since late 1800s to when it was completely defunct in the late 1980s (one uncle was still living there, without indoor plumbing, when he died in '85 or '86, I think. Then the fire department used it for a practice burn. )

            Sometimes the not-knowing makes for good conversations with our oldest relatives now, trying to guess who things belonged to. Frustrating, too, though, at times -- I wish I could go back in time and convince just one relative to write a daily journal!

            Comment

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