Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Navigation

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Dakota, just for grins I looked up what it takes to get a Mega Yacht Captains Ticket. Under 500 tons it is unbelievable the different levels and time involved. Up to 3,000 tons is like a lifetime of study. Not like the 6 pack license a Captain can get from Coast Guard on Great Lakes to take passengers for hire. This is my Fathers Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0713.JPG
Views:	42
Size:	722.6 KB
ID:	769268 Coast Guard license for passengers up to 65'.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post

    You nailed it Jimbo. I had big sperm whales playing with me while marlin fishing off Honolulu. We were nervous because they were big enough to capsize our 40 footer. A monstrous male about the size of a box car breached about 50 yards away and would have crushed our boat had he fallen on it.

    On inland lakes I drive real slow because of rock danger. One of the few time I cruised at night was on Lake Michigan where I was trying to get out 40 miles by the crack of dawn. I was cruising at about 40 mph heading directly into the moon light. I felt I could well see an debris on the water in that moon beam. However, without seeing it, I crossed a tanker wake that must have been five miles behind the tanker. The boat went air-born and all onboard were shaken out of their bunks.
    Depending on how they are loaded the freighters in the Gulf of St Lawrence would make three wakes, one of the bow, one midship and one off the stern. They were cruising about 15knots in the Ocean.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    Jimbo... on Lake Michigan, you go where the salmon are. Although most of the really big fish I have caught have been within a couple miles of the shore I've had times where you could slay them way offshore where they tend to school up at times. I've never seen better salmon fishing than when you hit one of these BIG schools way offshore. In one of them, I couldn't even get one downrigger down as they were hitting lures as soon as they hit the water.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	earl guinn '84.jpg
Views:	37
Size:	543.8 KB
ID:	769141
    Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post

    You nailed it Jimbo. I had big sperm whales playing with me while marlin fishing off Honolulu. We were nervous because they were big enough to capsize our 40 footer. A monstrous male about the size of a box car breached about 50 yards away and would have crushed our boat had he fallen on it.

    On inland lakes I drive real slow because of rock danger. One of the few time I cruised at night was on Lake Michigan where I was trying to get out 40 miles by the crack of dawn. I was cruising at about 40 mph heading directly into the moon light. I felt I could well see an debris on the water in that moon beam. However, without seeing it, I crossed a tanker wake that must have been five miles behind the tanker. The boat went air-born and all onboard were shaken out of their bunks.
    Get out 40 miles for what ? We rented 3 boats out of Saugatuk, MI. Went out a couple miles and all boats limited out with Salmon. You could have done it with a 18' outboard. So 8 limits was the captain, mate and 6 fisherman per boat. Everybody went home with about 50 lb of Click image for larger version  Name:	roy anderson 1987.jpg Views:	70 Size:	114.1 KB ID:	768848 salmon and we cooked some in MI for dinner. Those were the days.
    Last edited by jhjimbo; 03-15-2021, 10:37 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post

    My friend has sailed the Oceans for years and says the biggest danger in a 40' boat is floating shipping containers, whales and Ocean freighters, not to mention pirates.

    40mph at night is crazy. We cruised about 13knots.
    You nailed it Jimbo. I had big sperm whales playing with me while marlin fishing off Honolulu. We were nervous because they were big enough to capsize our 40 footer. A monstrous male about the size of a box car breached about 50 yards away and would have crushed our boat had he fallen on it.

    On inland lakes I drive real slow because of rock danger. One of the few time I cruised at night was on Lake Michigan where I was trying to get out 40 miles by the crack of dawn. I was cruising at about 40 mph heading directly into the moon light. I felt I could well see an debris on the water in that moon beam. However, without seeing it, I crossed a tanker wake that must have been five miles behind the tanker. The boat went air-born and all onboard were shaken out of their bunks.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post
    I took the same Power Squadron course that Jimbo did and it is a good one. I have relied on it in the great lakes, the gulf and both oceans on our coast. It works great. In big timber country I rely on terrain maps and a compass and I carry a whistle just in case. I don't hunt big country without a compass. The whistle lasts a lot longer than my lungs would if I ever need to signal for help. The whistle I supplied them has been instrumental in rescues a few times in the hands of rookies who got lost while we were hunting big country.

    I've had great experiences with onboard satellite GPS navigation as long as I was able to maintain a signal (forget it in deep forests with overhead trees blocking the signal). It works great on the seas and across the eastern part of the U.S. I don't count on it in the big country of the Rocky Mountain wilderness. It is usually the overhead canopy that blocks signals. For those accustomed to cell phone navigation, you can forget that in the wild west because there is no cell signal.

    I really never got into navigating by the stars because I prefer to stay put at night so I don't run into floating debris on the water or step off a cliff in the outback. My plan is to just sit tight til daylight but I've never actually had to do it. I did have a friend who prided himself on his night navigation skills. We both almost had our heads taken off when he hit a buoy that had broken loose and was floating in the middle of nowhere. It literally came over the bow hit the windshield and bounced over our heads at about 40 mph.
    My friend has sailed the Oceans for years and says the biggest danger in a 40' boat is floating shipping containers, whales and Ocean freighters, not to mention pirates.

    40mph at night is crazy. We cruised about 13knots.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    I took the same Power Squadron course that Jimbo did and it is a good one. I have relied on it in the great lakes, the gulf and both oceans on our coast. It works great. In big timber country I rely on terrain maps and a compass and I carry a whistle just in case. I don't hunt big country without a compass. The whistle lasts a lot longer than my lungs would if I ever need to signal for help. The whistle I supplied them has been instrumental in rescues a few times in the hands of rookies who got lost while we were hunting big country.

    I've had great experiences with onboard satellite GPS navigation as long as I was able to maintain a signal (forget it in deep forests with overhead trees blocking the signal). It works great on the seas and across the eastern part of the U.S. I don't count on it in the big country of the Rocky Mountain wilderness. It is usually the overhead canopy that blocks signals. For those accustomed to cell phone navigation, you can forget that in the wild west because there is no cell signal.

    I really never got into navigating by the stars because I prefer to stay put at night so I don't run into floating debris on the water or step off a cliff in the outback. My plan is to just sit tight til daylight but I've never actually had to do it. I did have a friend who prided himself on his night navigation skills. We both almost had our heads taken off when he hit a buoy that had broken loose and was floating in the middle of nowhere. It literally came over the bow hit the windshield and bounced over our heads at about 40 mph.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Originally posted by rock rat View Post
    Lost? In the US? Just walk in one direction a few miles.
    About 50 miles in the Adirondacks if you happen to go the wrong direction. There have been pilots who had to bail out lost for days that would walk right across a back road and go right into the woods on the other side. Luckily, one guy that did that was seen and rescued.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    This new technology will just about put the gasoline industry out of business. They estimate a basic EV will cost about $15.000. If the electric for the 10 min charge is not too much, gas can not compete. States should not abandon their coal, natural gas and nuclear plants too soon.
    BP is a big investor in the technology if that tells you something.

    Leave a comment:


  • PigHunter
    replied
    Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
    PH, there is new battery tech coming soon. It will give a Tesla 600mi range and recharge in less than 10min. It is called S.A.T. A basic EV is expected to cost about $15,000. Good time to buy some copper stock. The tech. will be used in everything.

    My Navigation in my Grand Cherokee has a sexy voice that will tell you when to turn, ect.

    In the woods remember, the moss grows on the north side of the tree.
    Jim, waiting on new battery tech is the best reason to postpone getting an EV. For now I'll just stick with my gas burners.

    I'd use my cell phone more for hunting navigation if the batteries are greatly improved.

    My Garmin car GPS has selectable voices but most of the time I keep it in silent mode and just monitor the display. I use a weighted dash mount in the middle, just under the rearview mirror. The GPS speedometer is often more accurate than that of the car.

    Leave a comment:


  • rock rat
    replied
    Actually it's spelled onX, kind of like how it's pronounced on-ex. Get the one that inserts into a GPS rather than the phone download. Phones run out of battery quickly when used as a GPS. Subscriptions lapse after a year. You don't need cell coverage to use the GPS feature on your phone or your GPS, but it's much better to go ahead and spend the 3 or 4 hundred for the GPS and the hundred or so for the onX chip. The amount of $ you guys spend on guns that end up spending their lives inside a safe you'd do better to get familiar with GPS.

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    Originally posted by Danbo
    https://youtu.be/Cp3bCRpro8I


    part 2 of ONX tutorial. There are more parts if you want google them.
    Thanks Danbo. Boy, there is a bunch of info to absorb in there. Very interesting as to what one can do with this app ! Might take some time to learn all the features, but well worth it !

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    Where I am in Oklahoma, getting lost is an exercise in futility! LOL!

    Pre 1904 land rush, the countryside was laid out in townships and sections.
    You may find a few blind sections, but you CAN NOT get over 1/2 mile from a road. Even if you ARE lost!

    Leave a comment:


  • rock rat
    replied
    Lost? In the US? Just walk in one direction a few miles.
    Last edited by rock rat; 02-23-2021, 04:08 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • PigHunter
    replied
    Originally posted by bowhunter75richard View Post
    I do not use any form of directional guidance, and so I probably also do not need to say that I have been lost more than once. But I really do not like to refer to it as lost, I just didn’t know where I was a few times. I have heard about onx and how wonderful it is and that it can even validate where your trek took you if proof is needed. Just how does that system work ?
    Ditto. I don't like calling it lost - it's more like I'm just temporarily turned around.

    I've never heard of the ONX app so looked it up for more info. It's interesting but there's not much at 1st glance on their web site. It warrants more research.

    I used 'HuntStand' when in a lease 2018 / 2019 but wasn't all that excited about it. But it did show property lines. The app I use most is 'US Topo Maps Pro' which can be operational even without cell coverage.
    Last edited by PigHunter; 02-22-2021, 08:02 PM.

    Leave a comment:

Welcome!

Collapse

Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

Right Rail 1

Collapse

Top Active Users

Collapse

There are no top active users.

Right Rail 2

Collapse

Latest Topics

Collapse

Right Rail 3

Collapse

Footer Ad

Collapse
Working...
X