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  • Navigation

    Always been fascinated by people navigating with the stars -- I can't get my mind around that at all. Out of all the achievements and "progress" of mankind, I think figuring out navigation takes the prize.

    I do pretty well with map and compass, not that I'm very often anyplace where I really need to navigate. I've never used GPS.

    Are you often in places where you have to navigate, and what's your usual method(s)?

  • #2
    Never been much of a "navigator".
    If it weren't for roadmaps, I'd never go anywhere! LOL!

    I had a 16 foot run-a-bout.
    In the main body of Lake Palestine, there was a huge floating log that seemed to never move. If you didn't know "where" it was, it could get ugly, quickly!
    One evening about dusky dark, headed for the boat ramp at the dam.
    I noted when I came into the main body of the lake, I could line up with the lights on the spill way and head straight for them.
    Then you watched for the lights in the boat ramp parking lot.
    When the two west lights lined up into one light, I would line up with those two lights. The floating log was about 100 yards to starboard.
    Cut power to about half throttle and when you could actually "see" the dock, kick it onto neutral.
    A little judicious R, N, and F and bring it along side the dock.
    Don't ask me to navigate any other part of the lake on the dark! LOL!

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    • #3
      Good question. As a kid, I started out using the sun's position and general time of day for navigation in the woods. Of course memorizing terrain features played a big part too. We had explored much of the woods around home and developed mental maps of the relationships of hills and drainages. That helped in guessing proper off-trail direction. Hunting opossums at night provided it's own challenge and memorizing terrain features was critical.

      As a teen, I self-taught how to use map and a compass. That's all I had in the early days of hunting public land. There were several times I was in error but always figured out the right route without getting lost. There's been a few times I've driven using the sun as a reference when deciding to make a turn onto another road.

      In 1999, I purchased the newly released Magellan GPS 315 handheld unit. I was a travelling salesman at the time and used it to help navigate to customer sites. It was a simple unit without road or topo maps but could store waypoints and have tracking. My rule of thumb was driving distance roughly equaled 1.2x straight-line distance. I used the unit for hunting, getting to my favorite spots in the dark without having to use trail markers. For boating, it was great for backtracking to the landing in the dark by helping to stay in the deeper part of the river channel.

      Around 2003, I upgraded to a Magellan SporTrac because of the built-in maps. That unit proved to be very useful and I had fun using it in the car as well as for hunting. That's what I used in 2010 for hiking in Southern California.

      In the mid 2000's I started using dedicated Garmin units for car navigation. Every so often I'll upgrade models and all three vehicles have one. We use them around town and for travel. I carried one to St. Croix in 2016 for use in the rental Jeep, having pre-programmed waypoints beforehand.

      In 2011, I purchased a Garmin Foretrex 301 wrist worn unit. It's a simple device with limited functionality and no maps. But I really like the small packaging and ease of use. I've used it for basic navigation, as a speedometer, and as an odometer. That's my main means of navigation when hunting, hiking, and canoeing.

      In the last three years I've started using my cell phone and apps for some navigation in the car as well as in the field as a secondary device. Using the GPS function is a power hog so it's not the best for long days in the woods unless you also carry a means of charging on the go.
      Last edited by PigHunter; 02-22-2021, 04:59 PM.

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      • #4
        PH, there is new battery tech coming soon. It will give a Tesla 600mi range and recharge in less than 10min. It is called S.A.T. A basic EV is expected to cost about $15,000. Good time to buy some copper stock. The tech. will be used in everything.

        My Navigation in my Grand Cherokee has a sexy voice that will tell you when to turn, ect.

        In the woods remember, the moss grows on the north side of the tree.

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        • #5
          I took a course in boat handling and seamanship. It was broken down in sections and one was celestial navigation. Once you get into it it all makes sense. The Organization is 'United States Power Squadron'. I was their youngest member at 17 and was actually teaching some of the subjects.
          This is a pic. of my Fathers boat. Click image for larger version

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          District 6 Home Page (uspsd6.org)
          Last edited by jhjimbo; 02-22-2021, 08:50 PM.

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          • #6
            I do not use any form of directional guidance, and so I probably also do not need to say that I have been lost more than once. But I really do not like to refer to it as lost, I just didn’t know where I was a few times. I have heard about onx and how wonderful it is and that it can even validate where your trek took you if proof is needed. Just how does that system work ?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by bowhunter75richard View Post
              I do not use any form of directional guidance, and so I probably also do not need to say that I have been lost more than once. But I really do not like to refer to it as lost, I just didn’t know where I was a few times. I have heard about onx and how wonderful it is and that it can even validate where your trek took you if proof is needed. Just how does that system work ?
              Ditto. I don't like calling it lost - it's more like I'm just temporarily turned around.

              I've never heard of the ONX app so looked it up for more info. It's interesting but there's not much at 1st glance on their web site. It warrants more research.

              I used 'HuntStand' when in a lease 2018 / 2019 but wasn't all that excited about it. But it did show property lines. The app I use most is 'US Topo Maps Pro' which can be operational even without cell coverage.
              Last edited by PigHunter; 02-22-2021, 09:02 PM.

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              • #8
                Lost? In the US? Just walk in one direction a few miles.
                Last edited by rock rat; 02-23-2021, 05:08 PM.

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                • #9
                  Where I am in Oklahoma, getting lost is an exercise in futility! LOL!

                  Pre 1904 land rush, the countryside was laid out in townships and sections.
                  You may find a few blind sections, but you CAN NOT get over 1/2 mile from a road. Even if you ARE lost!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bowhunter75richard View Post
                    I do not use any form of directional guidance, and so I probably also do not need to say that I have been lost more than once. But I really do not like to refer to it as lost, I just didn’t know where I was a few times. I have heard about onx and how wonderful it is and that it can even validate where your trek took you if proof is needed. Just how does that system work ?
                    I used just a compass until my son bought me the ONX system for Christmas. In May (Turkey season)I'll use it and let you know if I like it. The app tells you the public /private property lines and the owners of private property and how many acres they own.



                    Seems to be user friendly and I guess if you download the map for your area it'll work even if there is no internet coverage,



                    Last edited by Danbo; 02-22-2021, 09:50 PM.

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                    • #11
                      https://youtu.be/b1uVNbjxjKU

                      Here is a hoe to video on YouTube about ONX.

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                      • #12
                        https://youtu.be/Cp3bCRpro8I


                        part 2 of ONX tutorial. There are more parts if you want google them.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Danbo View Post
                          https://youtu.be/Cp3bCRpro8I


                          part 2 of ONX tutorial. There are more parts if you want google them.
                          Thanks Danbo. Boy, there is a bunch of info to absorb in there. Very interesting as to what one can do with this app ! Might take some time to learn all the features, but well worth it !

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                          • #14
                            Actually it's spelled onX, kind of like how it's pronounced on-ex. Get the one that inserts into a GPS rather than the phone download. Phones run out of battery quickly when used as a GPS. Subscriptions lapse after a year. You don't need cell coverage to use the GPS feature on your phone or your GPS, but it's much better to go ahead and spend the 3 or 4 hundred for the GPS and the hundred or so for the onX chip. The amount of $ you guys spend on guns that end up spending their lives inside a safe you'd do better to get familiar with GPS.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
                              PH, there is new battery tech coming soon. It will give a Tesla 600mi range and recharge in less than 10min. It is called S.A.T. A basic EV is expected to cost about $15,000. Good time to buy some copper stock. The tech. will be used in everything.

                              My Navigation in my Grand Cherokee has a sexy voice that will tell you when to turn, ect.

                              In the woods remember, the moss grows on the north side of the tree.
                              Jim, waiting on new battery tech is the best reason to postpone getting an EV. For now I'll just stick with my gas burners.

                              I'd use my cell phone more for hunting navigation if the batteries are greatly improved.

                              My Garmin car GPS has selectable voices but most of the time I keep it in silent mode and just monitor the display. I use a weighted dash mount in the middle, just under the rearview mirror. The GPS speedometer is often more accurate than that of the car.

                              Comment

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