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Clan of the Cave Bear

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  • Clan of the Cave Bear

    Have any of you read this? All I remembered was the cheeseball movie starring Darryl Hannah, but on a whim I grabbed the paperback yesterday from the library. It's got some pretty good primitive-survival stuff in it (naturally, being about ice-age hunters). What other good books has anyone read lately? I'm getting kind of starved for readin' and could use some recommendations.

  • #2
    Just completed "Angels in the Sky" by Robert Gandt.
    How a band of volunteer airmen saved the new state of Israel. (1948-49)

    "The G.I.'s Rabbi" the WWII letters of David Max Eichhorn. Eichhorn (Army Chaplain) was with the American troops that liberated Dachau.

    "The Boy Captives" by Clint L. Smith
    The story of two brothers captured by Indians in the late 1800's in Texas. One adopted by Comanche chief, the other bought by Geronimo.

    What was the name of the book Petzal was pushing not long ago about hunting in Africa? "Wild Events" or something like that.
    Last edited by FirstBubba; 04-24-2019, 10:43 PM.

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    • #3
      Now there's a blast from the past, I'd forgotten all about that movie!

      I finished up a book by Jim Zumbo not long ago, but can't say I'd recommend it, came across as a bit dated. I've had elk hunting on the brain and was looking for a fix but it didn't help much. Probably got as much out of the fore mentioned movie lol.

      Starved for readin' material.....kinda describes here lately.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
        Now there's a blast from the past, I'd forgotten all about that movie!

        I finished up a book by Jim Zumbo not long ago, but can't say I'd recommend it, came across as a bit dated. I've had elk hunting on the brain and was looking for a fix but it didn't help much. Probably got as much out of the fore mentioned movie lol.

        Starved for readin' material.....kinda describes here lately.
        I've always wished that FS writer Keith McCafferty would put out a volume of his elk-hunting stories in the magazine over the years. I've never hunted elk and probably never will, but I've always liked those. They don't do that like they used to, put out those collection-volumes (I guess google.books. has made them obsolete). I've read my old "Ted Trueblood Treasury" and "Field and Stream Treasury" to tatters.

        I tried McCafferty's detective novels but they didn't exactly pull me in.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
          Just completed "Angels in the Sky" by Robert Gandt.
          How a band of volunteer airmen saved the new state of Israel. (1948-49)

          "The G.I.'s Rabbi" the WWII letters of David Max Eichhorn. Eichhorn (Army Chaplain) was with the American troops that liberated Dachau.

          "The Boy Captives" by Clint L. Smith
          The story of two brothers captured by Indians in the late 1800's in Texas. One adopted by Comanche chief, the other bought by Geronimo.

          What was the name of the book Petzal was pushing not long ago about hunting in Africa? "Wild Events" or something like that.

          That captive story sounds like it's right up my alley; thanks for the tip. I wrote a college history paper on that topic and found umpteen different captivity narratives once I started digging. In a lot of cases, the captives weren't treated badly at all (though some of the Indians were known to flat-out kill small children or infants that they figured would be a hassle to take along). Daniel Boone was a captive himself for a while, of the Shawnees, I think -- but in his case he was probably happy to live with them where the debt-collectors couldn't find him.

          On the lighter side of the subject, do you remember the book and Disney flick "Savage Sam, Son of Old Yeller"? In that one, the two brothers get captured by Comanches or Apaches. It was a much better story than Old Yeller, in my opinion, but of course it didn't have the tearjerker angle so it didn't last up through the years like the Old Yeller movie did.

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          • #6
            I'm reading the Darwin's World Series about modern humans transplanted onto a primitive parallel Earth. Given just a knife, hatchet, and the clothes on their backs, they have to survive and build. The author is Jack Knapp and he does a pretty good job of describing the survival and building techniques. However, his character development is shallow.

            Since driving a lot lately, I'm also listening to an interesting true account of WWII from German soldier's perspective. Guy Sajer was sent to fight the Soviets and his account of those hardships is riveting. The book is titled "The Forgotten Soldier".

            Recently, I read and listened to a fictional account of a secret Cold War operation to bring down Soviet satellites. It's the Blue Gemini series by Mike Jenne. I highly recommend it.

            If you like alternate history, the Lone Star series is pretty good. A modern soldier is transported back to Texas a few days before the battle for the Alamo. He uses his knowledge to change early Texan history. I've read the first three books and have downloaded the next two for reading starting next week.
            Last edited by PigHunter; 04-25-2019, 10:34 AM.

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            • #7
              My reading lately is heavily skewered toward humor. If it doesn't bring a smile or laugh I don't bother. If I want drama or violence,I've got a tv.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by dewman View Post
                My reading lately is heavily skewered toward humor. If it doesn't bring a smile or laugh I don't bother. If I want drama or violence,I've got a tv.
                I'm just the opposite, I use tv for humor - Netflix, Amazon Prime, and YouTube

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by dewman View Post
                  My reading lately is heavily skewered toward humor. If it doesn't bring a smile or laugh I don't bother. If I want drama or violence,I've got a tv.
                  You ever read Donald Westlake's novels? In case you haven't, he was big in the 70s and 80s, always a crime-caper with dimwit crooks or a prison-escape kind of story, some pretty funny stuff. He was also the creator of Parker, the crook in the movie Payback, from his novel "Point Blank" (also an earlier movie with Lee Marvin). He wrote a bunch of Parker novels, using his pseudonym Richard Stark. No humor in those at all.

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                  • #10
                    Just finished ‘The Killing Angels’, a very good history of the Civil War, that being a time that fascinates me ! It is hard to digest what went on at that time, the absurd numbers of men killed in just 1-2 days in those battles is mind blowing. I did read Clan of the Cave Bear several years ago, found it most interesting ! Also very much enjoy Louie LaMoure books, takes me back to my first life, or at least it makes me very comfortable so thinking. As a youngster, read most of the Ian Fleming 007 adventures and many of the John Grisham novels in my older years.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by bowhunter75richard View Post
                      Just finished ‘The Killing Angels’, a very good history of the Civil War, that being a time that fascinates me ! It is hard to digest what went on at that time, the absurd numbers of men killed in just 1-2 days in those battles is mind blowing. I did read Clan of the Cave Bear several years ago, found it most interesting ! Also very much enjoy Louie LaMoure books, takes me back to my first life, or at least it makes me very comfortable so thinking. As a youngster, read most of the Ian Fleming 007 adventures and many of the John Grisham novels in my older years.
                      Right on. I bought a copy of The Killer Angels on my first trip to Gettysburg in 2003, and have re-read it probably five times. I think Michael Shaara came as close to getting it right as anyone can. I've got a boxful of Louis L'Amour's, started on those when I was in seventh grade -- what a great feeling, going to the school library and finding out that they had a whole wall-full of them! I was set for years. I still re-read a few of those every year. A few of them, I re-read so many times they fell apart -- so I went and bought fresh copies!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MattM37 View Post

                        Right on. I bought a copy of The Killer Angels on my first trip to Gettysburg in 2003, and have re-read it probably five times. I think Michael Shaara came as close to getting it right as anyone can. I've got a boxful of Louis L'Amour's, started on those when I was in seventh grade -- what a great feeling, going to the school library and finding out that they had a whole wall-full of them! I was set for years. I still re-read a few of those every year. A few of them, I re-read so many times they fell apart -- so I went and bought fresh copies!
                        Mr. L’ Amour (thanks for correcting my sp) had a wonderful way to include the reader directly into his works. I see a few of his books have been made into TV movies and are always cast with fantastic actors, those who fit their parts with great affect. The writings by his daughter have left me somewhat disappointed, she does not carry through with the greatness of her father, but maybe that is unfair to say ! Re-reading many of his books was like a visit from a very dear friend, one who brings great warmth to one’s heart !

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by bowhunter75richard View Post

                          Mr. L’ Amour (thanks for correcting my sp) had a wonderful way to include the reader directly into his works. I see a few of his books have been made into TV movies and are always cast with fantastic actors, those who fit their parts with great affect. The writings by his daughter have left me somewhat disappointed, she does not carry through with the greatness of her father, but maybe that is unfair to say ! Re-reading many of his books was like a visit from a very dear friend, one who brings great warmth to one’s heart !
                          Did you know about his son Beau's projects, too? There's a book out right now called "No Traveler Returns," one of Louis's very early efforts, a seafaring novel that he wrote while he was a seaman himself. Beau has revised it (though it's still mostly Louis's work) and added some essays and historical notes. A lot of the old short stories are being re-released, too, in collections with introductions and notes from Beau.

                          http://www.louislamour.com/

                          Yep, as far as I am concerned, Sam Elliot is the ultimate actor for a Louis L'Amour western!

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                          • #14
                            What can anyone say about Mr. Elliot other than truly ‘fantastic’ ! It saddened me recently to see a photo of him and how much he has aged. If it wasn’t for his still remaining ‘stash, I might not have even recognized him. I will need to bring myself up to date on Beau’s works, thanks.

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                            • #15
                              Found this on TTAG.
                              Think I'll order it myself!

                              https://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/20...avid-harsanyi/

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