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  • #16
    Pop grabbed me after school one day to help him shoe a horse.
    Right front shoe on! Piece of cake!
    We had to tie his off side foot up.
    Then we put him on the ground.
    I was 15 and weighed about a buck 65.
    I had a twitch on his nose, one ear in my mouth, the other ear twisted up in my hand and laying across his head!
    THAT little knotty s.o.b. got up!
    I put him back in the pen with one shoe on.
    THAT is the only horse we didn't get iron nailed to!

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    • #17
      I had a big grueller (grueyer) gelding that was too lazy to stand on three legs to get shod. I've seen our horse shoe man hit him in the side with a hammer to get him to stand up nearly every time we took him to get shod. We used to just trim hooves and clean out the frogs on the ranch without getting some of the stock horses shod, and that horse would do every thing but lay down just getting his hooves trimmed!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Happy Myles View Post
        My how I disliked milking cows, dawn and dark, no excuses. Just at my most grumpy moment in came a stinging swat to the face by the cow’s tail. If I happened to remember to tie down the tail, instantly the cow had to pee. Could you get a ten year old to hand milk cows today?
        We have a few families kids I would say yea but for the most part you would stand a better chance of getting blood from a turnip.

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        • #19
          I know all about the snakes and chickens and getting kicked around lol. I was allowed to make the wise choice of keeping a bull one year because I thought it would ve better than barrowing a bull to breed with. My pap let me have my way on the terms I was in charge of the bull. At around 1200 # and trying to round him up everyday before school I finally decided that maybe it wasn't a better choice. So the plan was to sell the bull to a neighbor and watch him chase him for the rest of his days. After my uncle suffering a broken leg trying to load him in a stock trailer he ended up at the butcher. Needless to say we started barrowing a bull again the next year.

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          • #20
            I'm late to this game. Was busy with prepping for my late son's medical malpractice pre-trial.

            I suspected they were some sort of hobble. Never milked a cow (Can you believe that? At least one thing I never did in my life). The hobbles I had for my horses were leather buckles. My horses were wise to them, especially the paint mare. She could travel miles down the trail during the night with them on. So I cut them in half and quick-linked a ten foot length of 1" chain to one strap, tied about 25' of braided nylon rope to the end and that was my picket. A heavy screw-eye with ring in it would be screwed into a short heavy log and the rope run through it, around the log, and tied off with bowline. The horse could drag the log around the meadow during the night with bell on. The other one stayed tied up short. When the bell stopped I got up and changed the picket. Not sure I could get away with that these days. I believe the Forest Service now has regs against it. Too many greenhorns abused things.

            P.S. The chain would lay flat against the ground and was better for avoiding tangle ups. Better ... but not perfect. I recall one moonlit night I awoke to a bull elk screaming at my horses. No bell could be heard either. Oh oh! I quickly got dressed and hustled out to them with a flashlight and gun in hand (horny bull elk have been known to kill pack stock ... check out the old 1930s photo in Schaeffer Meadows ranger station). Finally found my paint on the ground and royally tangled up. There I was trying to unbuckle her and untie the other one with wet frosty fingers, all the while that bull was working himself into a rage somewhere in the dark maybe fifty yards away. Finally got the horses back to camp and stoked the fire. That bull simply vanished by the next morning. No snow in the early season so no hope of tracking him.

            Thanks for that trip down memory lane.
            Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 02-26-2019, 10:27 AM.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by crm3006 View Post
              I had a big grueller (grueyer) gelding that was too lazy to stand on three legs to get shod. I've seen our horse shoe man hit him in the side with a hammer to get him to stand up nearly every time we took him to get shod. We used to just trim hooves and clean out the frogs on the ranch without getting some of the stock horses shod, and that horse would do every thing but lay down just getting his hooves trimmed!
              I fed a few the flat side of the file when shoeing. A couple of horse cubes in the pocket worked wonders. If the horse stood for a bit while cleaning the sole, then a cube came out for them. If they jumped around, they got slapped. Most figured it out fairly quickly. I would not twitch a horse. I know how and had the equipment but never would use it. That's for an emergency when a horse has hurt itself and panicking. Or maybe when fixing their teeth. In worst case scenario I'd throw an animal before twitching. Only had to resort to it once ... but I didn't shoe mules. Only rarely shod anyone else's stock anyway. I hated it. I was strictly a cold shoer and that takes a lot more time than hot shoeing. Always felt the end result was better though. If one takes the time to do it right. Best to make the shoe fit the horse rather than make the horse fit the shoe.
              Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 02-26-2019, 10:26 AM.

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              • #22
                Never twitched a horse either. If I couldn't get them to stand still by just twisting an ear, they got thrown. Only ones we ever threw was a colt that got bad wire cut and had to be doctored, and stud colts for castration. Never used hobbles, either. Our ranch stock was used to coming to feed in the morning, and I could rattle a bucket and whistle up my old grueyer gelding from anywhere. Have turned him out in strange pastures for as much as a week, an come back to find him either standing at the gate, waiting, or coming at a fast trot when I rattled the bucket and whistled. He would also lead from a pickup window, or follow a pickup and trailer like a dog. Don't remember how many times I've loosened his cinches and tied up the bridle reins and driven off with a load of cows or calves, and he would just follow the trailer. You had to drive fairly slow. No problem in pastures and on gravel country roads. I don't have any use for a horse anymore, but wish I had one, all the same. Doubt if I could ever get one as well trained for a general using horse as that gruyer gelding that my Grandfather gave me when I was thirteen years old, and he was two.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by crm3006 View Post
                  Never twitched a horse either. If I couldn't get them to stand still by just twisting an ear, they got thrown. Only ones we ever threw was a colt that got bad wire cut and had to be doctored, and stud colts for castration. Never used hobbles, either. Our ranch stock was used to coming to feed in the morning, and I could rattle a bucket and whistle up my old grueyer gelding from anywhere. Have turned him out in strange pastures for as much as a week, an come back to find him either standing at the gate, waiting, or coming at a fast trot when I rattled the bucket and whistled. He would also lead from a pickup window, or follow a pickup and trailer like a dog. Don't remember how many times I've loosened his cinches and tied up the bridle reins and driven off with a load of cows or calves, and he would just follow the trailer. You had to drive fairly slow. No problem in pastures and on gravel country roads. I don't have any use for a horse anymore, but wish I had one, all the same. Doubt if I could ever get one as well trained for a general using horse as that gruyer gelding that my Grandfather gave me when I was thirteen years old, and he was two.
                  By buddy has two plain ole quarter horses who are pastured about 400 yards from the house. All he has to do is whistle and they are at the gate waiting, open the gate and they go right to the barn by themselves. These two where born on his farm and have been there their whole lives. He slept in a stable with them when they where born. They have been all over the west on elk hunts they have been up north moose hunting. Two of the best horses I have ever been around in my life.

                  Comment

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