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Ishawooa and the gang. What rifle and caliber would you prefer using to hunt elk in Wyoming? Are long shots fairly common? I'm t

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  • Ishawooa and the gang. What rifle and caliber would you prefer using to hunt elk in Wyoming? Are long shots fairly common? I'm t

    Ishawooa and the gang. What rifle and caliber would you prefer using to hunt elk in Wyoming? Are long shots fairly common? I'm thinking E R Shaw maybe and 300 Wby. Already have the dies.

  • #2
    Del a 300Wby would work just fine, I would choose a good 180 or 200 grain bullet and if all goes well you have meat in the freezer.

    Comment


    • #3
      Del, I was a guide in Colo. for several years and long shots can be common but most are under 200yds, some out to 350(I would'nt let "my" clients shoot past that).
      The guy that I guided for had a .300 Win Mag minimum when he was alive, but took elk regular with a .243.
      I used a .30-06 for 3/4 that I have taken, other was a bow.
      Where are you headed to find the "BIG" deer ?
      idduckhntr is right, I'd stick with the 180gr. incase of a "long" shot. Good luck and good hunting.

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      • #4
        I have hunted in eastern Idaho just over the Wyoming border for years and a 30-06 has always worked well for me and my dad but like idduckhntr and big o said go with at least 180gr.

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        • #5
          As I have mentioned in these pages before, I've killed elk with everything from 243 through 375 H&H. Use an 06 or a 300 and you will do fine. I've killed 34 bulls, and don't recall how many cows. Plus packed out many for others. Most killed under 200 yards. Embarrassed to say killed a 383 Utah bull at just over 600 yards. with one shot from a 300 Win Mag using 180 grain Nosler Partition. Too long of a shot, but too big of a bull to pass up. Have hunted Wyoming many times.

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          • #6
            Del,

            The .300 Weatherby is one of the best elk calibers around if you don't mind the recoil and can shoot it well. A buddy of mine has a .30-.378 Weatherby and he shoots it like an '06!. Personally, I find the greatest challenge is getting steady for the really long shots anyway.

            I have only taken elk out to 308 yards (per rangefinder) and much past that I pass on the shot. I have tracked one wounded elk that I did not recover (although I think a hunter on the adjacent ranch shot him) in my experience and rather not do that again. So my .35 Whelen and .30-06 are entirely adequate for the job. Where I hunt, shots are typically 150 - 300 yards or are waaaay out past that.

            I have dreamed about a big 7mm or a really fast .30 for elk. But, I got rid of a .338 Win Mag many years ago due to the recoil and blast. I know ol' Clay will jump me for being such a recoil puss, but what the heck. Maybe I'll try a .300 Wby myself since I think I am a much better shooter now than I was in 1988. Prior to that, the biggest rifle I had shot was an M-14, unless you count the 106mm Recoiless Rifle!

            Good luck with the Weatherby. I love my Mk V.

            WMH

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            • #7
              For 30 cal 180's would be the heaviest. My preference would be my 338 Win Mag with Hornady 225's at 3000fps. Those Caribou out to 700 yards never knew what hit them!

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              • #8
                WA Mtnhunter

                Funny Man!

                Must be my Browning A-Bolt 338 Win Mag I’d rather shoot in than any 300 Mag!

                As for being a puss, I sold my 300 Win Mag back in 82 and replaced it with a 25-06 and never looked back if that tells you anything!

                Can’t figure you out?

                You will shoot a 300 Weatherby Mag but not a 338 Win Mag???

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                • #9
                  PS

                  The most I have ever been kicked by is a 12ga 3 1/2 inch!

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                  • #10
                    Del in KS

                    Who’s that beauteous Young Lady, is it your Granddaughter?

                    Better have your rifle ready for later!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      A .300 Wby is just about as nasty as a .338 Win.. That's why you get them in rifles that are almost as heavy.

                      Your Shaw in .300 Wby would be great, a .338 or 8mm or even a fast .35 would be better.

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                      • #12
                        I've been racking my memory to recall if elk hunting in one state is much different from another. Where I have hunted there are some exception, but on balance similar you may have short or long range shooting. One obvious exception is Roosevelt Elk in the pacific northwest where it can be thick and wet.

                        I have never found elk hard to kill and have never lost one. Probably lucky shooting.

                        Have hunted them in British Columbia, California, Idaho. Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Wyoming, Montana, Oregon, and Colorado. A state I know very well is Nevada, but have never been drawn for elk, despite putting in many, many times.

                        Terrain can be very different from area to area. For example the canyons of the Salmon River vs rolling hills of Arizona, but techniques pretty similar.

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                        • #13
                          LOL

                          I said I was "dreaming" about a .300 Weatherby, not that I will ever get one! 3.5" - 1 3/8 oz. 12 ga. don't seem to bother me goose hunting? Those 2 1/4 oz. turkey loads are another matter! A fast .35 like a .358 Norma is a bit much, maybe worse than a .338 WM.

                          There was an NRA edition .300 Weatherby Mark V at the Friends of the NRA banquet last month that I bought WAY too many tickets for. Boy, was that a beauty! I think I will stick to my .30-06 and .35 W until I go to Alaska for grizzly.

                          WMH

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Del as you might be aware the kid and I shoot almost every type of legal rifle at elk since we live here in the Rockies and have the opportunities. Our absolute favorite is the .338 Win but maybe not exactly for the reason you might think. As I have said before the 225 gr bullets of good construction such as Barnes or Nosler properly loaded will shoot long range almost as good as a .300 of equal case volume. The difference I can see is that up close the .338 is much more effective in event you need to stop a charging grizz or keep a bull from crossing into YNP. I have seen lots of .300s of various cases and bullets pass completely through deer and elk with the critter continueing to run like nothing happened. The same holds true for .270 and .284. I have heard of this scenario with .338 Accubonds but have never used them and have not actually seen it happen. I still feel that the .300 Weatherby is one of my absolute favorite rounds. Flat shooting, good bullet choice, recoil is acceptable, much muzzle blast, rifle might be a bit heavy, brass is expensive unless you can find Remington which I am told is inferior to the Weatherby/Norma. Having shot lots of them in numerous configurations I personally consider it to equal the .30-.378 in the field if not on paper. Apparently Roy felt the same way. Read some of the things he said and did back in the fifties and sixties when HE had ready access to both and still prefered to use and market the .300. Maybe he also did not want to compete with his own product. Certainly in the nineties when the .30-.378 finally was being made and sold by Weatherby they needed something to keep them in business as stimulus checks were not the fad back then. You could not see a new .30-.378 on the dealer's shelves for a great while but after a few years the used ones started showing up. I know many people who use .300s and others who shoot .338s with great success. Frankly either will do the job as will an .30-'06 most of the time. As shots tend to be long (300-700 yards) around YNP due to difficult terrain, short seasons, and elk herds moving about due to predators I like a flat shooting rifle. Happy Myles seems to have a better grip on this matter than most of us given his vast experience which appears to be long and wide. That Shaw gun certainly looks like a nice piece of work but I have not held one in my hands. Petzal smiles at it so I would buy one just on that consideration alone. Now about the .300 Weatherby in a Shaw, will you have them freebore it or not? Also I have always wondered if the spiral flutes don't impart considerable stresses into the barrel. In spite of the supposed advantages of a 6 or 8 flute barrel I have never found fault with a plain barrel of proper contour for hunting.
                            John Porter of Morning Creek Outfitters was in Alaska the last two weeks hoping for a high book B & C brown (grizzly) bear. He turned down all the bears he saw but his group did fill four wolf tags although the natives of this part of Alaska were discouraged that the lower 48 crew elected not to shoot their alloted seven. Non-residents can only participate in wolf hunting and not wolf management programs in an ongoing effort to maintain the ungulate populations of our largest state.

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                            • #15
                              Everyone, Thanks for the info. Back when I lived in AK had a Win Mdl 70 in 300 Wby and recoil didn't seem to bother me. Shot a bull Caribou with it 250-300yds.
                              Since this might be a one time thing figured I better take the best caliber for the job in case of a long shot. Personally I like a heavy, long barreled rifle. It's easier to hit with from off-hand position and heavy gun recoils less. That said I won't be taking my 12 lb Shiloh Sharps.
                              Wa Mtnhunter I shot a grizzley and a blackie with my 350 rem (same bullistics as 35 Whelen) Both went bang flop. I feel the Whelen would be plenty for bear. It's just not ideal for a long shot.

                              Ish, the 338 is another round I was considering. Never owned one but I have shot the old Sgt Majors A-bolt. As far as the fluted barrel goes I'm not into garrish things and probably would specify a plain barrel.
                              Coop, My 8 month old granddaughter pulled herself up to a standing position last week. Did it again for grandpa today. She'll be hunting and fishing before you know it. You are right about recoil and 3.5 inch shotguns.

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