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When sighting-in a scope, and you turn the turret "up" are you moving the reticle up or the bullet up? For example, if my gun is

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  • #16
    Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post
    Based on the confusion it commonly causes, I suggest you forget about the direction of the crosshair movement forever. If you want your impact point on the target to move UP, move the elevation knob in the UP direction. Each click is normally a 1/4 inch at 100 yards. If you want it to go LEFT on the target, move the windage knob to the LEFT.
    So if I aim at the center of a target that is 300 yds away and hit nothing, but then aim at the very top middle of the target and it hits low to the right... which way do you adjust the scope?

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    • #17
      Originally posted by etexan View Post
      I don't try to sort it out but I have targets which manage the logic. You know the ones with a center aiming point which looks like a diamond, red and smaller aiming points in each quadrant of the page. The targets have always had the Redfield name on them and also have one inch horizontal and vertical gridlines. Shoot a group at the center spot and the group will be off, possibly, by the nearest gridlines. Those gridlines will have a notation of L or R for windage and U or D for elevation. Adjust your scope by the number of the gridline times the value of each click per inch in the direction indicated by the target. This is much easier to do than it is to explain. No experimentation needed.
      Here is a link to a very similar type sighting in target with the same notations.

      https://www.westcoasthunting.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/champion-redfield_precision_sight_in_target.jpg

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      • #18
        "if you cannot explain it easily, you don't know it well enough"
        Just Aim crosshairs at Bullseye and fire 1st shot. Locate your Bullet Hole. Now while looking through the scope move your crosshairs to The Bullet Hole. And that's it you're zeroed in. Now, I know getting the crosshairs to The Bullet Hole is where it can be confusing. Just imagine that the turret knob you're turning is like the head on a bolt and your crosshairs are the nut. Turning it clockwise will bring the "nut or crosshairs" towards the knob and counterclockwise will push it away. Elevation or windage it's all the same.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Trusavage View Post
          "if you cannot explain it easily, you don't know it well enough"
          Just Aim crosshairs at Bullseye and fire 1st shot. Locate your Bullet Hole. Now while looking through the scope move your crosshairs to The Bullet Hole. And that's it you're zeroed in. Now, I know getting the crosshairs to The Bullet Hole is where it can be confusing. Just imagine that the turret knob you're turning is like the head on a bolt and your crosshairs are the nut. Turning it clockwise will bring the "nut or crosshairs" towards the knob and counterclockwise will push it away. Elevation or windage it's all the same.
          Advice - Ignore the previous answer. That is not easily explained.

          If you shoot left, follow the directions on the scope to move right. Think of it as moving the bullet. In your example, if you're shooting low, follow the directions on the scope to move up.

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          • #20
            I’m just as confused trying to figure it this way I’ll just keep doing what I’ve always done and had no problems trying to follow these steps it’s very confusing. Who else agrees?

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            • #21
              Every time I read these post bout zeroing like this it confuses the heck outa me and I’ve hunted all my life and not had a lot of trouble getting my zero

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