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When sighting-in a scope, and you turn the turret "up" are you moving the reticle up or the bullet up? For example, if my gun is

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  • When sighting-in a scope, and you turn the turret "up" are you moving the reticle up or the bullet up? For example, if my gun is

    When sighting-in a scope, and you turn the turret "up" are you moving the reticle up or the bullet up? For example, if my gun is shooting low do I turn the turret up or down? And this may be really dumb question.

  • #2
    "UP" refers to the "point of impact".
    You're over thinking the situation!

    Comment


    • #3
      When you turn the turret up you are moving the cross hairs up. The simple answer is adjusting the scope cross hairs to were your rifle just put the bullet.

      Comment


      • #4
        Carl,
        Bag your rifle, watch the crosshairs, dial the turret "up". The crosshairs will move DOWN.
        A scope is like a front sight!

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        • #5
          My Bad, Bubba like you said I was thinking

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          • #6
            I was trying to bore-sight my rifle today, and when I moved the turret "up" it seemed to make the reticle go up.???

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            • #7
              It helps to think of it this way. In sighting a rifle, the shooter strives to place the crosshairs where the bullets are striking, and not the other way around.

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              • #8
                Based on the confusion it commonly causes, I suggest you forget about the direction of the crosshair movement forever. If you want your impact point on the target to move UP, move the elevation knob in the UP direction. Each click is normally a 1/4 inch at 100 yards. If you want it to go LEFT on the target, move the windage knob to the LEFT.

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                • #9
                  DakotaMan got it right. Just turn it in the direction the bullet needs to go to hit the bulls eye.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for the answers, and I understand it now.

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                    • #11
                      Generally, when adjusting a scope you want to imagine you are moving the bullet holes in your target.

                      When bore sighting, it will be backwards because you are moving the reticle in relation to the bore.

                      Of course you are always doing the latter, but that's the way it works.

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                      • #12
                        I don't try to sort it out but I have targets which manage the logic. You know the ones with a center aiming point which looks like a diamond, red and smaller aiming points in each quadrant of the page. The targets have always had the Redfield name on them and also have one inch horizontal and vertical gridlines. Shoot a group at the center spot and the group will be off, possibly, by the nearest gridlines. Those gridlines will have a notation of L or R for windage and U or D for elevation. Adjust your scope by the number of the gridline times the value of each click per inch in the direction indicated by the target. This is much easier to do than it is to explain. No experimentation needed.

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                        • #13
                          It's sort of like pouring piss out of a boot with the directions printed on the bottom of the heel. Easy for you Texans to understand just follow the arrows. Go Sooners!

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                          • #14
                            think of cross hairs as rear sight--when sightin in rifle if bullet hits 2 inches to right -- move scope 2 inches right--yes cross hairs move left-- just like rear sight would do to move point of aim to the right where ur 1st shot hit-- now it would be opposite if ur allowing for wind drift -- hope this helps

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                            • #15
                              Target impact down equals moving the elevation turret clockwise.
                              Target impact left equals moving the windage turret clockwise.
                              Thus the opposite is true for the above and the amount will vary on you MOA (minute of angle) on how far left or right you will turn or "click" and how far you are away from the impact target you are striving for.

                              Comment

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