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Many of you on here have Mausers that you haved sporterized. So, where were these actions made, and what company made them.

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  • Many of you on here have Mausers that you haved sporterized. So, where were these actions made, and what company made them.

    Many of you on here have Mausers that you haved sporterized. So, where were these actions made, and what company made them.

  • #2
    The M98 Mauser rifles have been made by more than 16 factories and licensees over time and have been copied by many other factories in Poland, China, Spain and elsewhere, so any effort I make to address that question will fall short.
    The large-ring (M98) rifles I've personally sporterized were my favorite, an M1909 made for Argentina by DWM (Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken) in Berlin.
    Another by Steyr (Austria), a third by J.P. Sauer, and a fourth by Fabrique Nationale of Belgium.
    I've had earlier models (the M93 and M96), but some of the M98 variants are gems! I should add, since there are so many variations and copies, the buyer does well to be discriminating.

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    • #3
      The model 96 in 6.5X55 is Sweedish military rifle, also referred to a Carl Gustaff. Mine was imported by Century Arms. I had a gunsmith drill and tap for U.S. scope base, put a sporterized safety on it, remove the back sight and put a sporter type bolt on it. At first it did not shoot well and the smith found it had a bad barrel. Contacted Century and they sent me a new barrel and the smith installed it.
      Fantastic hunting rifle and very under appreciated cartridge. For example, the 6.5X55 has more energy at 100yds than the 30-30 has at the muzzle. This is a low recoil highly accurate rifle suited for beginners and women.
      I reload from 100gr to 160gr bullets for it. The deer I have shot with it don't go far.

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      • #4
        I have a Swedish 6.5x55 that I sportrized on my profile. It was un-issued and had ALL matching numbers. I was recovering from bilateral knee surgery. I had some Elk horn, I weld pretty good, and Checkering is not as hard as you think. Me and my hobby's usually get bigger than both of us combined.

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        • #5
          The Swedish 6.5x55 action cannot handle modern day pressures so watch your chamber pressures. One of the best Mauser Actions that was most sought after was the US Military 03-A3 30-06.

          The following two links are very informative and gives you the insight of Mauser Actions and the serious risks involved in using.

          U.S. Military M1903A4 Rifle - Remington:

          m1903.com/sn/usmilookup.php?file=us_m1903rem4.dat


          Some Observations On The Failure
          Of U.S. Model 1903 Rifle Receivers
          Joseph L. Lyon, M.D., M.P.H.

          m1903.com/03rcvrfail/


          and remember,,,,,

          KEEP THE BARREL HOT!

          AND

          THE X-RING FULL OF HOLES!

          targets......UP!

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          • #6
            I bought my large ring M98 Mauser in 1967. It was manufactured in 1936 by the German manufacturing plant “Mauser AG Oberndorf”. It was made for the German war effort leading up to World War II and it has the stamp of the eagle holding a Nazi Swastika. I didn’t care for their political views but could not argue with their rifle manufacturing as one of the best in the history of the world. Of course slave labor helped them produce an exceptionally high quality product at a relatively low unit cost.

            I bought it for its famed receiver which I considered to be one of the most reliable and one of the strongest ever. I wanted the reliability for hunting and the strength for working up and testing my own wildcat loads with new bullets and powders that often had very little reloading data available (I agree with Clay though that the 03-A3 was a very reliable knockoff).

            It has served me well since I bought it. I have chambered it with one barrel in 25-06 Neidner, a few 25-06 Rem barrels and it now wears a .300 Dakota barrel. I have personally shot over 40,000 rounds through that action and it has only failed me once. In that case, at about 38,000 rounds from me, I had just missed a low flying antelope and in my excitement jacked the bolt back with exceptional speed. The bolt shroud detent spring had weakened and allowed the bolt shroud to rotate on the bolt when it hit the back of its stroke, freezing it in my receiver. That antelope lived to run another day but I replaced that tiny spring for less than a dime and it has worked fine ever since. I should have replaced this spring at 30,000 rounds but learned my lesson.

            I’ve tested lots of high pressure loads in that receiver with complete faith. I even blew one 25-06 barrel off by accidently shooting a hot round through ice in the barrel. The bolt has cycled reliably through mud, dirt, snow and ice. It has chambered and extracted the ugliest of dented, dirty and icy cases without issue. It is my most reliable and strongest action by far. In terms of accuracy, its never shot worse than .5 MOA even with heavily worn barrels (except for a completely shot out barrel that key-holed bullets at 25 yards). With newer barrels it has always produced .1-.2 MOA accuracy.

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            • #7
              Carl, I am putting a picture of my 6.5X55 up - before the scope was mounted.

              Clay, I only load to published data for the 96 Mauser.
              I had the 03-A3 and really liked it. It was a two grove and after the receivers were strengthened. Wish I had it today.


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              • #8
                M.A.T., Are considering the purchase or "customization" of a Mauser rifle?

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