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Does anybody on here tape ballistics to their stock?

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  • steve182
    replied
    I shoot only inside of 300yds and know what my bullet does at that range w/o a cheat sheet.

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  • steve182
    replied
    I shoot only inside of 300yds and know what my bullet does at that range w/o a cheat sheet.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    OH, I'd say it is the "long range hunting crowd" that does this more than the "range crowd". On the range, shooting notes and Smartphone ballistics software are typically used to confirm these facts. When hunting we don't have time for that.

    A buddy of mine went to a very expensive three day training session in Montana for long range hunting where they taught him to do this. It only cost him about $5000 for that and a little other advice. I give him credit for preparation though and he has successfully taken numerous trophies from 400 to 800 yards throughout the world.

    To the contrary, I think it is the "short range shooting crowd" that doesn't use this practice. You have to have quite a brain to memorize a couple dozen related facts and have perfect recall in a moment of adrenalin rush. Most current hunters are "short range shooters" and don't need this but I would advise everyone who intends to prepare their rifle and their capability for shots beyond 600 yards to tape ballistics info on their stock and make it large enough so they can read it without reading glasses.

    With better rifles, scopes, bullets and technology arriving every day, we will see more of this practice in the field and hunters will move their ethical ranges out just like they did as we transitioned from the long bow to the rifle. That is unless the new computer-based sighting and shooting control systems take over. Then we won't need it.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    OH, I'd say it is the "long range hunting crowd" that does this more than the "range crowd". On the range, shooting notes and Smartphone ballistics software are typically used to confirm these facts. When hunting we don't have time for that.

    A buddy of mine went to a very expensive three day training session in Montana for long range hunting where they taught him to do this. It only cost him about $5000 for that and a little other advice. I give him credit for preparation though and he has successfully taken numerous trophies from 400 to 800 yards throughout the world.

    To the contrary, I think it is the "short range shooting crowd" that doesn't use this practice. You have to have quite a brain to memorize a couple dozen related facts and have perfect recall in a moment of adrenalin rush. Most current hunters are "short range shooters" and don't need this but I would advise everyone who intends to prepare their rifle and their capability for shots beyond 600 yards to tape ballistics info on their stock and make it large enough so they can read it without reading glasses.

    With better rifles, scopes, bullets and technology arriving every day, we will see more of this practice in the field and hunters will move their ethical ranges out just like they did as we transitioned from the long bow to the rifle. That is unless the new computer-based sighting and shooting control systems take over. Then we won't need it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Happy Myles
    replied
    I have always felt the least I can do is memorize this information. So far this has worked fine

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  • WA Mtnhunter
    replied
    No, I know precisely where point of aim should be for each of my hunting loads. I etch it into my brain before the hunt.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    Taking long shots at big game beyond 200 yards was something I was taught by my dad to avoid out of respect for the animal (we never did any varmint hunting). So, we never had need for Kentucky windage charts taped to our guns.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    The young fella I took deer hunting last week had some ballistics stuff taped to his gun's butt stock. It was from the previous owner. Patrick was having a difficult time trying to peel the crap off without wrecking the finish on that hardly-used old Remington 700. I suggested rubbing alcohol. I should check to see how he made out. Frankly, I had never seen anything like that before. Must be something the range crowd does. I'm not much for the range scene.

    Leave a comment:


  • Treestand
    replied
    I did at one time with my Win/70-.264Mag.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    This isn't needed for rifles that are fast and flat shooting and hunting conditions where shots will be under 400 yards or so. For example, I zero my 25-06s at 200 yards and aim where I want to hit at 100 and 200. I level on the top of the back at 300 yards, eyes at 500 yards and top of the rack at 600 yards. I need to remember 10 mph windage for 500 and 600 but don't have to worry about wind short of that.

    Long range shooting presents different issues though. I tape ballistics info on all rifles that will shoot out to 1000 yards or beyond. My long range rifles all have reticle hashes for precise holdover out to the ranges I intend to use them but I need help remembering drops and windage for a dozen or so ranges. If I don't remember it I take time to look. If I don't have time to do this, I don't take the shot.

    If I think I have time, I prefer to dial come-ups and windage on the turrets when game is over 600 yards away.

    I watch the wind and measure the wind continuously while I hunt or while stalking, checking my windage memory at various long ranges against what is on the stock.

    For slower, limited range rifles like the 30-06 with 168g bullets, I just put windages on the stock for 400 yards and beyond. I use the scope's BDC reticle for holdover on all shots out to 700 yards.

    For many years I only shot one fast rifle with only a couple loads (varmint and deer) and I shot that nearly every week. It was a lot easier to remember the drops and windage that way for sure.

    Leave a comment:


  • M.A.T
    replied
    What I do is I go to www.hornady.com/ballistics-resource/ballistics-calculator and type in my bullet information(BC, MV, weight, sight in range, etc.) click "calculate", and at the bottom of the results it says "print". I print on a piece of paper, trim it down to make it fit on my stock, then tape it on.

    Leave a comment:


  • SD_Whitetail_Hntr
    replied
    without trying to sound like a pompous donkey I forced myself to memorize what I need to know for a specific hunt or shooting scenario. So it's actually very limited the holds I need to memorize for given yardages in deer hunting situations. So I just memorize the distances and mil's associated with those for my round. It's served me well because I've had a scenario where a buck got kicked up while I was posted in a corner of a field. He ran by me flat out and didn't stop til he was 325 yards out but stopped broadside. I knew my drop was right at 20" at 300. 2 mils = 21 (approx.) at 300. I'm zero'd at 200 tho and so all I had to do was memorize differences between 200 ballistics on my round to 300, 400, etc. Being comfortable with mil conversions is really what it came down to. I'm sure a table for quick reference would actually be easier.. haha

    Leave a comment:


  • Sarge01
    replied
    Right now all of my shots are 150 yards or less. I have my ballistic tables taped on all of my ammo boxes in case I need to reference them on future hunts where the shots will be longer.

    Leave a comment:


  • RockySquirrel
    replied
    Yup on all my rifles. I stay with the same round too, Find the best one and never switch.

    One year the deer of a life time is going to walk in front of me and i war to be ready.

    Leave a comment:


  • mike0714
    replied
    I have mine on the inside of the lens cap on my scope. Tells me what each of my mill dots are or what my holds are on guns without a turret.

    Leave a comment:

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