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True or False: Can Doe Fawns be Breed before their first Birthday. All guesses Welcome and NO peeking thanks.

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  • True or False: Can Doe Fawns be Breed before their first Birthday. All guesses Welcome and NO peeking thanks.

    True or False: Can Doe Fawns be Breed before their first Birthday. All guesses Welcome and NO peeking thanks.

  • #2
    OK no peeking. I would say yes. Depending on the food source and how well feed the animal is. Puberty hinges on all animals depending on the animals ability to have the pregnancy come to term. I have also read that a diminished food source leads to more female and less males being born. This enables the species to survive. I do not know if this is junk science.

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    • #3
      Can a one year old doe be bred? I think yes, if he can catch her.

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      • #4
        Here's a S.W.A.G.!

        Does breed (normally) late Oct through Nov.
        Gestation is 180 days, or 6 months.
        This means birth should occur in Apr or May. That would put a yearling doe at about 5 to 6 months of age when the breeding "cycle" occurs in the fall.
        I'm not sure their reproductive system is mature at that time.

        I'd say yes.

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        • #5
          Well, without peeking I am not sure about whitetail. I asked a biologist with University of WYO just last week about mulie does first cycle and was told that they can be bred but more often than not they aren't until they are 1 1/2 yrs old. Not sure the truth, but will say; yes, but it's rare it happens.

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          • #6
            FirstBubba, I have to go with your explanation and agree that a six month old doe could enter estrus during her first year. I also have to agree with Carl that the food source would have to be good enough for the young doe to be physically large enough to breed. So if all conditions work in the doe's favor, I would have to say yes.

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            • #7
              My post should have said "yes to TRUE"

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              • #8
                true. doe fawns usually go into heat during the second rut.

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                • #9
                  I have always heard that they can be bread the first year. And as my eyes glance up at habben97 I now remember hearing that they come in later, toward the end of December(at least where I'm at)

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                  • #10
                    I'm going to say yes.

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                    • #11
                      I'd say yes. Because, in order for them to be more than a year old when they first breed they'd have to skip a breeding season.

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                      • #12
                        Doe fawns born early in the spring could be mature enough to breed in their first fall season, and a certain small percent of them do.
                        I know this to be true in the case of European red deer, so I'm guessing that it is also true for other species of deer.

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                        • #13
                          OK The Answer is TRUE a Fawn Doe can be Breed as early as in her 6th month to her 8th Month.
                          Carl & 99E you Guys are on top of your Game.

                          Thanks T-Stand

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                          • #14
                            First Bubba,
                            Point of Information.
                            A deer is called a yearling during its second year of age.
                            That same deer is called a fawn during its first year of age.
                            Good Luck Hunting, Everybody!

                            www.biggamehunt.net/forum/definition-yearling

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