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.338 Winchester Magnum vs .300 Weatherby Magnum.

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  • .338 Winchester Magnum vs .300 Weatherby Magnum.

    .338 Winchester Magnum vs .300 Weatherby Magnum.

  • #2
    300 Weatherby all the way. Don't own one but I have a .340 Weatherby. The minimum load for the .340 Weatherby is higher than the maximum load for the Win Mag.

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    • #3
      Energy comparison:
      300 WbyMag 4122 lbs.ft. energy 220gr
      340 WbyMag 4930 lbs.ft. energy 250gr
      300 WinMag 4187 lbs.ft. energy 190gr

      and the winner is...

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      • #4
        He said 338 Winchester Mag and not 300 Win mag.

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        • #5
          jhjimbo.... you are mixing apples with lemons, boy! .300 Win Mag can't hold a candle to a .300 Roy, which leaves the Short Fat's in the dust, as well. The .338 Win Mag can't come close to the trajectory and velocity of the .300 Roy either. For the recoil, I'll keep the Weatherby.

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          • #6
            The power of both is within 100 ft.-lbs, trajectory at 300 yds are within 2 inches of each other, the .338 Win. Mag. would probaly get the nod for penetration because it fires heavier bullets, ammo availability is probaly in favor of the Win. Mag., wind drift is within 3 in. out to 500 yds, the catch is the .338 has more kick. If you're hunting you're probaly be firing 1-4 rounds, but the key to shooting accurately is not being afraid of you're gun.

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            • #7
              Sorry, just read Saffado and got mixed up from the original question.

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              • #8
                Be kind WAM, apples and oranges, not apples and lemons. Both are fine calibers. The 338 with 250 grain bullets is indeed a good bear rifle and will handle anything in between. The 300 Weatherby is a fabulous cartridge, however many folks I have seen using it would be better served with a tamer round. Kindest Regards

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                • #9
                  Never cared for the .338 Win mag after the Model 70 lemon I had. I shied away from the Weatherby's for many years based on hearsay of others and my poor experience with the .338 Win Mag. You are right, unless you know how to handle the .300 Roy, best stick with a lesser adequate cartridge. I don't find either of mine a chore to shoot.

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                  • #10
                    If the most common cartridge in Alaska is the 338 Win Mag, that alone should tell you something.

                    Personally, I prefer th 338 Win Mag over the 300 Weatherby Magnum through experience myself with the two.

                    Your average shot is going to be within 200 yards actually 40 to 150 is more like it. I just can't justify paying the extra bucks for a name brand (don't like fads anyhow)and not on the shelves at most sporting goods. If you roll your own, you can use bullet weights on the market starting around 180 grain on up to 300 grain for the 338 caliber. As for brass, not only I use 338 Win Mag brass, I also use 7mm Rem Mag and 300 Win Mag witch requires trimming to length but when it's free and abundant, who cares!

                    The difference between a 300 In Mag and a 300 Weatherby Magnum is like comparing a 308 to a 30-06. Quite honestly, all the critters I've witnessed shot such as Caribou and Moose didn't know the difference. The best Moose kill was with a 30-06 with 180 grain over the counter Remington Core-Lokt®.

                    If you got deep pockets and want to play show a tell, I say go with the 300 Weatherby Magnum, it would be a good conversation around the camp fire. But if you want a real work horse, I'd go with the 338 Win Mag hands down.

                    "The only reason they make magnums is so those like Happy and WAM can feel pain and hear noise when they pull the trigger!"

                    (snicker)

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                    • #11
                      Clay,
                      Actually I use big calibers so I won't feel a lot of pain for a long time after I pull the trigger.

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                      • #12
                        Clay,
                        You are an enigma (no, not enema). Poking fun about the perceived recoil of a .300 Roy and advocating the .338 Win mag? The .338 Win has way more recoil with its heavier bullets than the .300 Wby and is generally found in lighter weight rifles yet again intensifying the felt recoil. So your .338 is not a magnum?

                        Snicker at your own self! LOL!

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                        • #13
                          P.S. Hope the leg heals up soon! 73's

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                          • #14
                            It depends on what you intend to do with it.

                            The .300 Roy is an extremely versatile cartridge. You can load it with 110g varmint bullets at 3900 fps and shoot p-dogs or long range varmints all day. Its speed with regular 130g-150g deer bullets at 3700 or 3500 fps respectively allows you to minimize hold-over and lead to absolute minimums. This eliminates many variables in placing the bullet where it needs to be on distant or running game.

                            You can load down slightly and target shoot hundreds of rounds per day out to 1000 yards with 210g or 215g Berger bullets. There isn't an animal in North America that can stand up to a good smoking 210g-240g bullet from the Roy.

                            The .338 Win Mag would only provide advantage in Africa or Alaska where targeted animals are very large and you prefer operating on the high end of the energy spectrum with very heavy bullets. You will pay for this in recoil and if you learn to flinch, your advantage with the .338 will be lost.

                            When considering both of these, I personally chose the .300 Dakota for improved long range accuracy potential and slightly greater speed than the .300 Roy. I haven't been disappointed. To give you an idea, I've tested loads up to 4200 fps with 110g bullets and up to 3600 fps with 165g bullets. I don't shoot these regularly to save barrel life but it can smoke them when I want it to. It will deck an elk at 1000 yards and has the accuracy to hit a coke can at that range.

                            There may be a Roy chambered in something somewhere that shoots .1 MOA but I can tell you that my .300 Dakota does it just as I had hoped. I'm very happy with the .300 scale cartridge and wouldn't switch to the .338 if I were hunting in Alaska. I'd use the .375 H&H or the .416 Rigby in Africa rather than the .338.

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                            • #15
                              Dakota,
                              Your last point about the .338 being selected for only the biggest game makes sense. A hunting buddy lived in Alaska for 15 years and Wyoming for 12 years and his rifle is a Rem 700 in 25-06. He has 35 black bears so far, and countless other game including a bunch of antelope. The current TV shows of Alaska and Yukon show the guys with AR-15's, some type of what looks like a .303 and other non magnum guns. Another Alaskan born I know who recently moved to lower 48 says his 'meat' gun is a .270.
                              So, the big .338's only seem to come into play when big bears are the order of the day.

                              Comment

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