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Would you guys say that with something like this that the pain outways the fun or the fun outways the pain? See first post.

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  • Would you guys say that with something like this that the pain outways the fun or the fun outways the pain? See first post.

    Would you guys say that with something like this that the pain outways the fun or the fun outways the pain? See first post.

  • #2
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=8uJouw9uh84

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    • #3
      Those guns were designed for bird hunters to get several birds at once. They were fired against something like a bail of straw. Mostly used by meat hunters who sold their game.

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      • #4
        The pain outweighs the fun.
        That gun needs to be ported:-)

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        • #5
          Four gauge?!
          Yeah, a bit much for teal!
          Hard to believe Samuel Baker's favorite rifle, "Baby", was a TWO gauge!

          Gauge - the number of leads balls the same diameter as the bore, required to weigh ONE POUND!
          A 4 gauge shoots a 4 ounce round ball, or four ounces of lead shot!
          Baker's 2 gauge launched a HALF POUND projectile!

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          • #6
            A market hunter's gun, or "punt" gun, was often a ONE gauge and it wasn't shoulder fired! For obvious reasons!

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            • #7
              FirstBubba, you're right about how to determine the barrel diameter of a 2 gauge shotgun is - two lead balls having the same diameter of the barrel would weigh one pound. That doesn't mean that people actually shot 1/2 pound projectiles.

              That's like saying all 12 gauge shotgun shells have 12 pellets and all 16 gauge shotgun shells have 16 pellets. Pellet size is a completely different issue. You can shoot both 20 gauge and 12 gauge shells that have 5 sized shot.

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              • #8
                I do have to agree with you Bryan01, bore diameter has nothing to do with shot weight or size. The only reason bigger gauges shoot bigger, heavier shot is because to use the full potential of a bigger gauge shotgun you should use heavier and mayber bigger shot.

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                • #9
                  Bubba is right. A 12 gauge shotgun has a bore that is .729 inches in diameter. Twelve lead balls that size would weigh one pound.
                  If that shotgun fired only one ball, it would weigh 1/12 of a pound.
                  If a two-gauge shotgun fired only one ball that was the same diameter of the bore, it would weigh 1/2 pound.
                  But as we know, a shotgun can be loaded to fire any number of balls, or pellets, of varying sizes. They don't have to be the same diameter as the bore.

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