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Here's a question for the botanists in the bunch. While goose hunting today I noticed a very odd looking fruit tree in the gull

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  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    Interesting. I have never seen a thorny crabapple tree. The fruit clumps make me think it is a hawthorn of some sort but the size of fruit would very large for one of those. I'll take the real camera out in the next day or two and get some more photos. First time hitting that field this year (actually spotted that tree two years ago) and it's hot for geese right now. Only shot two yesterday but that was plenty. Lots of them were landing out in the middle. I pulled the decoys in close to the edge because I really didn't want to get loaded up. Freezer is already packed. Beautiful morning and I was more interested in watching the birds and checking out that tree. Only wasted one shell. I passed on a ton of 40 yard shots.

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  • Carl Huber
    replied
    PS; Another aspect of Apple Trees. They for the most part are not propagated through seed. Rather cross pollination and finally grafting from a host to root stock.

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  • Carl Huber
    replied
    OH I think you're wrong as far as Crab Apples go. True the many apple trees in North America are transplants. But the Crab Apple was indigenous.

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  • habben97
    replied
    hey Ontario, as a rule I don't go around eating unidentified fruit. good way to get sick or worse.

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  • bruisedsausage
    replied
    Well the fact that you're still typing means it probably wasn't yew tree berries. j/k

    Sounds to me like a hawthorn of some type? but without seeing it...well it's just hard to armchair.

    Could also be a crab apple as those have thorns sometimes too.

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  • Longrifle
    replied
    OH, If you are pretty sure it is not a Hawthorn, of which there are many varieties, I would venture to say it is in fact a crab apple. There are also many species of crab apple and the wild ones here are thorny. Saw some online that look to be in clusters. Another possibility would be some type of wild plum or even wild pear. I get wild crab apple in overgrown pastures that are real thorny, but don't fruit in clumps. The fruit is yellow and the size of a bantam egg. This reminds me I once shot a buck in bow season that was full of dark red crab apples about an inch in diameter. I might revise my guess to crab apple first, hawthorn second, plum third. Or plum, crab apple, hawthorn?

    The hedgerow you mention sounds like just the place to get the side dressings for cooking or glazing your goose!

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  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    I was thinking maybe hawthorn but couldn't find any variety that looks quite like this one. Its fruit seems to be twice if not three times the size of any hawthorn I have seen. I have hunted another hedgerow further up the valley that definitely has hawthorn shrubs along with chokecherry, Saskatoon berries, wild currents, a few blueberry bushes, and tons of raspberries. Quite the cornucopia.

    Bubba, the sloe is dark colored well before it loses its leaves whereas this thing has bright red (almost iridescent) fruit when almost no leaves are left on it.

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  • 99explorer
    replied
    It sounds like the Canadian cluster orange tree, a variety of arctic citrus that ripens when covered with snow, and very popular with the Eskimos

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  • hal herring
    replied
    Longrifle is correct- this site won't let me post any real answer

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  • hal herring
    replied
    Longrifle is correct- this site won't let me post any real answer

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  • hal herring
    replied
    Longrifle is correct- this site won't let me post any real answer

    Leave a comment:


  • Longrifle
    replied
    p.s. Look up genus "Crataegus" That it?

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  • Longrifle
    replied
    OH, Sounds like a Hawthorn, aka "Thornapple". Those spikes will puncture a tire. Very good for wildlife. Like small crab apples.

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  • FirstBubba
    replied
    The "sloe" is edible when dark purple to black in color.

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  • jay
    replied
    the only tree I can think of with thorns is a locust tree, not sure if they bear fruit or not.

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