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Here's a question for the botanists in the bunch. While goose hunting today I noticed a very odd looking fruit tree in the gull

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  • Here's a question for the botanists in the bunch. While goose hunting today I noticed a very odd looking fruit tree in the gull

    Here's a question for the botanists in the bunch. While goose hunting today I noticed a very odd looking fruit tree in the gully behind the barley field I set my decoys in. It is shaped like an apple tree with similar bark, but it has long thorns and brilliant red/orange fruit about the diameter of a nickel that hangs in clumps. The tree is about fifteen feet tall and sorta gnarly. The fruit was NOT sweet. Dang near turned my mouth inside out! Anyone have any idea what this was? It's certainly a beautiful thing and I'm thinking about seeing if one will grow from seed for the front yard.

  • #2
    Honker; For all the times you made fun of us guys with smart phones, this time you could have used one and didn't have it.

    There are a number of very good phone database apps for Plants. I have the Audubon Trees of North America with pictures. When I see a tree I don’t know and want to know, I just look it up. That applies to apps for birds, insects, rocks and minerals, and stars and constellations. Also while I am driving home the point. Topo maps on board for the area I am in and Solunar tables (and exact sun rise and sun set for where you are at) and a camera to take a picture of that tree so you can look it up when you get home. I also have a couple of novels to read when I am sitting in a tree stand (or sitting in the dentist waiting room). None of the above need a network connection. And if you can get a connection, the latest weather radar. A GPS and an app that tells you what plane is flying overhead and where it is headed, when it is slow in the afternoon.

    It not about games, its about having that encyclopedia in your pocket.

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    • #3
      From your description I would say it is the only apple tree native to the Americas the Crap Apple Tree

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      • #4
        PS Used by my people as an additive to make Jellies and Jams because of the high amount of pectin.

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        • #5
          Not a crab apple. Have one of those in my back yard. This tree has thorns. Crab apples don't. Also, crab apples don't hang in clumps from the same spot on the branch.

          I took a photo with my cell phone but alas I cannot transfer it to my computer or even my email until I return to the US. I'm still using my California cell from when I worked at Yosemite before my son died. It's a great plan for US and Canada so I kept it. But I'm using only a flip phone. Didn't want even that but finally broke down. Security at airports kept bothering me. With no cell phone I was always being flagged as a suspicious person. Possibly mentally ill.

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          • #6
            Also, no apple trees are native to North America. I believe they originated in Asia.

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            • #7
              Black thorn.
              If I'm not mistaken, the fruit is a "sloe" (pron: slow)
              Kind of plum like.
              Without actually seeing the tree, it's hard to tell.

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              • #8
                the only tree I can think of with thorns is a locust tree, not sure if they bear fruit or not.

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                • #9
                  The "sloe" is edible when dark purple to black in color.

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                  • #10
                    OH, Sounds like a Hawthorn, aka "Thornapple". Those spikes will puncture a tire. Very good for wildlife. Like small crab apples.

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                    • #11
                      p.s. Look up genus "Crataegus" That it?

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                      • #12
                        Longrifle is correct- this site won't let me post any real answer

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                        • #13
                          Longrifle is correct- this site won't let me post any real answer

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                          • #14
                            Longrifle is correct- this site won't let me post any real answer

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                            • #15
                              It sounds like the Canadian cluster orange tree, a variety of arctic citrus that ripens when covered with snow, and very popular with the Eskimos

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