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On the whitetail, the big Hawk left an exit hole of considerable size. Not only did the buck go down promptly, but the blood tra

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  • On the whitetail, the big Hawk left an exit hole of considerable size. Not only did the buck go down promptly, but the blood tra

    On the whitetail, the big Hawk left an exit hole of considerable size. Not only did the buck go down promptly, but the blood trail looked like it had been laid with a bucket. This is an indelicate subject but exit wounds and leakage to follow can be the difference between quickly recovering game and the unpleasant alternative. — G. Sitton ".45-70 Government" Petersen’s Hunting The shot Mr. Sitton made on his buck was at just under 200 yards with a scope sighted Ruger #1, 45/70 spitting a 350 slug. Now days we tend to place quite a bit of emphasis on small(er) and swift. Are we missing something by ignoring big and slow(er)?

  • #2
    Yes.

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    • #3
      God forbid we limit ourselves to 200 yard shots...

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      • #4
        yes i think we are . one of my favorite calibers for deer here is the 375 winchester . i have it in a mod 94 big bore and a ruger #3 . and with a 200 -250 grain bullet . it is slow but when it gets there some one is going to know it .

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        • #5
          Cooner,

          I have a friend who has a Big Bore .375. You won't find him in the woods without it! It is a crusher, no doubt.

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          • #6
            Of course we are. Many sportsman wont buy a product because it doesnt shoot 500 yards at 3000 fps, even when half or more of there shots are within 200 yards, and most of the other half could be gotten within 200 yards with patience. I think bigger bullets and slightly slowere fps will improve recovery rate graetly, and we will save a ton of money also. Thoses bullets may kill if put int eh vitals, but a bigger slower bullet will kill int eh vitals also and allow you to possibly get a quick follow up shot if needed on slightly wounded game when a smaller load has the deer gone so fast from lack of wound channel we cant even tell for sure if it was a hit or not.

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            • #7
              A nice slow bullet ensures that you are hunting, not just spotting and shooting.

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              • #8
                That's what my 350 Rem mag bolt gun does. It pushes a 250 grain Speer hot core bullet 2400 fps. It's a cheap bullet that in this case performs very well.

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                • #9
                  Absolutely, I'd guess 90% of us shoot deer at less than 150yds, more like 75. Big bores do amazing things. As far as slow, that's all relative. What many people don't realize is the slow bullet they are talking about is actually traveling at twice the speed of sound and better. That's a lotta slug movin there.

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                  • #10
                    bee keeper , i love my big bore she is in the side of the cabinet that will never be parted with lol . the #3 i bought two years ago for four hundred used, the guy says to me i got some ammo that goes with it and gives me 9 boxes of ammo. it is worth almost what i paid for the gun . i dont mind saying i almost pee'd my pants i was so happy . : )

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                    • #11
                      As I've stated before. I'm from the "Keith"/"Ruark" schools. "Bigger IS better/use enough gun".
                      In deferance to certain people who love smaller rounds, unless I'm shooting squirel's or pred.'s it will AT LEAST be a .30 cal.
                      I love a blood trail Ray Charles could show to Stevie Wonder, at least when there is a trail. Most times it's as said before, BANG, FLOP !

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                      • #12
                        Cooner,

                        No doubt it was well worth the change of underwear! What a deal. I had a chance to buy a #3 in .375 and passed it up. It was late 80's and I could have bought the gun for $285! I wish I could get another chance at one...

                        I'll just keep shooting my 45/70 and my .338/06 when I feeel the need for a large bullet. The .338/06 is one of the best decisions I've made in a rifle. Not much more recoil than a 30/06 and It will do most anything that can be done with a .338 Win mag. The .338/06 is the classic example of percieved lower velocity not selling a round.

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                        • #13
                          I think there is some merit to both philosophies. In a pinch, i'll go for the bigger/slower over small and fast. Like shane said, i'm hunting, not shooting. If i was hunting wide open terrain, like grasslands, beanfields or plains, i'll take the speed.

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                          • #14
                            Overall, I would say yes, people are over focused on how far they can shoot. This is a classic comparison of speed vs strength (do you want a running back that is fast or one that can break through the line). As with everything in life, there is an appropriate middle ground for the best results of the situation.

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                            • #15
                              bee keeper

                              i am glad to hear you love your 338-06 . i am waiting for a barrel blank in 338 to come from mid way as i write this, it is been on back order for what seems like forever now but when it comes in yippy. i got the reamer and the head space gage already . but i cant wait to try out my 338-06 a square ackly improved . she is going to be my new ( mammal hammer )

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