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How many Big Game Hunters on F&S will be using a Rangefinders this Season and What Brand Name do you use.

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  • How many Big Game Hunters on F&S will be using a Rangefinders this Season and What Brand Name do you use.

    How many Big Game Hunters on F&S; will be using a Rangefinders this Season and What Brand Name do you use.

  • #2
    I have a Bushnell Yardage Pro Sport that meets my needs for rifle, archery and ML.

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    • #3
      I have the same good pick.

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      • #4
        I have a Bushnell but not sure what model. I don't usually use my range finder when deer are present. When I get to my stand I range fallen logs or other memorable locations so I can compare those to the deers actual location giving me a close distance without any movement.

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        • #5
          Nikon Monarch 800, can't afford a Leica.

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          • #6
            Bushnell Elite 1600 ARC. I can range an antelope on the prairie at 700 yards (probably a lot more). I can pick up trees/rocks at 1600 yards and beyond. Ranging an elk, deer or buffalo at 1000 yards is a sure thing no matter what the terrain. Factors up/down angle into bullet drop for my loads and nails these within less than a second. It is so quick and accurate I probably won't use my mil-dots for range calculation this Fall (but will have them for backup).

            It has been great for varmint hunting. I can range a fence post or a piece of sage brush next to a p-dog at 1000 yards or pick up a fox at 750 yards while my buddies are mostly limited to ranging trees at 300 yards to estimate distances.

            Although it would work fine, I don't use it for ranges inside 300 yards for my rifles because I shoot flat shooting bullets that have minimal drop within that range. I don't use them for archery either since I can estimate distances well myself out to 30 yards or so.

            I found varmint hunting interesting last Spring. Most of my hunting buddies had Nikon and Bushnell range finders with numbers in the 400-800 range and they flat couldn't range a fox standing at 420 yards. Most of them couldn't even range a sprinkler pivot head station at 400 yards. If you are considering purchase, I suggest trying it for ranges you expect to hunt. My Bushnell is great for varmints, deer, antelope and elk out to 1000 yards with no problem. It would work much further I think but that is as far as I go for hunting.

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            • #7
              I personally have no use for rangefinders, as I stricly observe the 300-yard rule.

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              • #8
                Nikon 600, AND the 300 yd. rule.

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                • #9
                  Nikon

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                  • #10
                    Guys, what is the 300 yard rule? Does it apply to certain types of rifles or certain terrain or perhaps certain animals? Is it one of those rules like not hunting on Sunday that are local to certain states, areas of the country or certain ethnic groups?

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                    • #11
                      I think of it as an arbitrary sportsmanship limit on the distance a big game animal may be shot at with conventional hunting equipment.
                      No offense intended toward expert riflemen with specialized sniping equipment.

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                      • #12
                        I have a Nikon 800 which I use for archery. I usually just range trees to get oriented when I set up.
                        I don't bother during deer season because in the spots I rifle hunt if you can see the deer it is inside of 100yds and usually inside 50.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks 99. I had just never heard of it before. I have found that perceptions vary considerably between hunters from the west/prairie states and the south-east seaboard.

                          In the former, hunters often see their game from miles away or jump animals that are usually on the full run at first sight, often 200 yards when they jump and you know they won't stop for 10 miles or more. In the former, I observed hunters practicing diligently for a lifetime, honing their accuracy skills with exceptionally fast, flat shooting, accurate rifles (e.g. 22-250, 25-06, 7mm Mag, .300 Win).

                          In the latter, people usually can't see game more than 50 yards away because of the dense vegetation and they are taught to shoot at only stationary game. 1000 yard visibility is rare because of the dense forests and it is nearly impossible to find an area to practice shooting at that range. In the latter I see a wide variety of cartridges and rifles, many of which are very slow and inaccurate (e.g. 30-30, .35 Rem, black powder). Many of those hunters take their rifle out of the closet once a year for deer season where pie plate accuracy is more than sufficient for the average 50 yard shot. I suspect that fewer than half of the hunters in this group even check their zero before their hunt... no real need unless they happen to unaccountably miss a shot.

                          I was first made aware of this difference on one of the first deer I shot in Georgia. It jumped from 30 yards in front of us as a buddy and I were walking a quiet ridge to our stands in the timber. I was trained to be ready at all times for a quick shot (comes from lots of pheasant and quail hunting and walking ridges for deer) and he was trained to shoot only from his stand. The deer streaked for a canyon wall 30 yards away like it had been scalded. I shot the buck (had the good fortune to hit it exactly where I aimed high/back of shoulder so as not to damage meat from that smokin' 25-06) but its momentum carried it far over the canyon wall and down a 200 foot drop. My buddy (from Georgia) hadn't even raised his rifle, assuming that it was an impossible (or perhaps unethical) shot. I have no doubt that for him, it was unethical because he not only never practiced such a shot, he firmly believed that such shots were not possible. That is the way he had been taught.

                          I must say, that having done most of my hunting in the western states, I have seen some mighty amazing shooting from the hunters out there. They aren't taking pot shots, they are just filling their tags the way they have been taught and the way they have trained. My brothers and I have spent many a day shooting targets towed behind Dad's old truck and shooting targets or p-dogs out to 1000 yards for practice. That being said, most of my deer, antelope, coyotes and foxes have been taken within 250 yards because that is where the majority of the good shots come from. None of us look for poorer shots, we just prepare to execute those shots well just in case that is all we get.

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