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In September my wife and I will be moving to a ranch in Wyoming. It is the first time I will have hunted anything (other than wh

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  • In September my wife and I will be moving to a ranch in Wyoming. It is the first time I will have hunted anything (other than wh

    In September my wife and I will be moving to a ranch in Wyoming. It is the first time I will have hunted anything (other than whitetail and hogs) outside of the state of Maine. I do not yet understand the state hunting tag system in Wyoming, but from what I do understand, nearly everything is a lottery. Is there a surefire way to be able to legally hunt SOMETHING? I'm a little nervous about not being able to hunt due to licenses. If anyone is familiar with Wyomings license process I would love to hear more.

  • #2
    You have to live in most places at least six months to acquire residency status. So you will be a non-resident hunter this year. Probably not much chance to pick up a big game tag over the counter as a non-resident but you might get one through an outfitter ($$$$$). I suggest you pick up a non-resident bird/small game license and just stick with that this year. Lots of birds to hunt and quite a variety. Be patient.

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    • #3
      Thanks OH- I was thinking along the same lines. Not sure about duck hunting out there as alot of the ranch's land is mountain meadows and trout streams, not conoe-able streams or swampy areas. I guess I'll just have to lay my "traditional" waterfowl hunting style on the back burner and get creative. Were are able to hunt a very large tract of private land for most of Wyomings species. While vacationing there I found two matching sets of a couple decent 6X6 bulls. And rode a 13 mile loop on some great ranch horses without ever leaving the property. The horses were game, the views were awesome, people were great natured and there seemed to be plenty of wildlife to chase. We are certainly excited about the opportunity, but I'm going need all the help I can get from the men on here, as most all my spot and stalk has been in a state with 90+% forest. thanks again. Hope the grandbaby and his mum are both well. Happy hunting.

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      • #4
        phw, if it is to late this year for big game hunting in Wyoming as a non resident then you can always go back to Maine for a week to deer or bear hunt and stay with your family.
        Good Luck in Wyoming!

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        • #5
          Yes sir Mr. Devine, that is certainly my back up plan!! LOL! I don't think I can go with out a fresh kill in the freezer for a whole year, so if it requires a plane ticket, then a plane ticket it is!! Thank you very much, good luck on the bear this year, I'm sure you've got his number.

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          • #6
            Wyoming does have residency requirements so you might be out for 2 years given that drawings are in the spring if I remember correctly. I lived there briefly years ago but if I remember correctly it was 1 year living there for a resident license so I would get a P.O box and drivers license for Wyoming ASAP when you move there. Antelope archery tags used to be over the counter but all the stuff I wanted was draw. A non resident license if you need it is worth the money though.

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            • #7
              When I was up there a little while back we were told that in Park County you can buy any tag, even elk, over the counter and in the rest of the counties you have too draw. What county are you headed?

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              • #8
                Converse co. About 30 miles from Douglas.

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                • #9
                  I doubt non-resident's can buy anything big game over the counter. In any county.

                  Do not even think about trying to fudge your way past residency requirements. Pay no attention to those who would tell you to get a PO Box and/or drivers license. These days everything is computerized to your SSAN. You MIGHT get away with it ... for a while. When you get caught (and you WILL get caught) you will be looking at a huge fine, and probably losing your license privileges for at least a decade ... in 37 states!!! It is NOT worth the risk.

                  I guess what pisses me off is the Western states all require you to change your drivers license and vehicle plates within sixty days of relocating but won't let you claim residency status for up to a year. Talk about a double standard! Take the money as fast a possible but give up nothing!

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                  • #10
                    OH- I couldnt agree more about staying honest, I would be ruined without the ability to hunt. However I think the reason Hobob mentioned for getting a PO box ASAP is to show proof of being there so that I don't get railroaded for a second year of Non-Res status. IMHO.

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                    • #11
                      I would get a United Parcel Service mail box with a key at their UPS store. Each mailbox is called a "suite" just like many offices in this country.

                      The dumb-dumb government workers don't know your address is a small bow with a key and they could care less. I know a guy who got a Passport with his UPS key operated mailbox that is only 6 inches by 3 inches. Like I stated there not the brightest bulbs in the government.

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                      • #12
                        typo mistake box not bow.

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                        • #13
                          PHW I just went to their website and it is one year of residency before you apply for or purchase the tag. Ouch!
                          I would do all of the above but also register to vote which can be a crucial requirement for residency in many states. I cost me a year of out-state tuition in Colorado. From the website:

                          To qualify for any resident game and fish license, permit, preference point, or tag, a person shall be domiciled and shall physically reside in Wyoming for one (1) full year (365 consecutive days) immediately preceding the date the person applies for or purchases the license, permit, preference point, or tag and the person shall not have claimed residency elsewhere for any other purpose (including, but not limited to, voting, payment of income taxes, purchase of resident hunting, fishing, or trapping licenses, etc.) for that one (1) year period

                          Good luck and my guess is the hunting will be worth the wait. I really miss Colorado even after 9 years in MN. The deer hunting is better here but I really miss elk on the menu and the Rockies are hard to beat for a hunting venue.

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                          • #14
                            Don't worry, Pray. I guarantee you if you live in one of those small communities the cops will be counting the days till you are legally required to change your plates. Go ahead and change them as soon as you can. Generally a utilities bill for your new residence will be the proof they are looking for when changing your plates and drivers license. But still stick to non-resident hunting license till you can legally change to resident.

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                            • #15
                              Ontario I did not advise the PO box to get around residency. I got one when I lived there to get mail cause I was off the grid in Yellowstone. You certainly must not try working the system. That is why I advised a non-resident license next year. The headache comes trying to get a non-resident license with a Wyoming address. It might be nothing but a phone call to the fish and game Dept would probably help avoid confusion. Its a headache and a half sometimes. I ended up living in Montana and that was years ago. I just remembered it was a year in Wyoming when I was considering living there. With computers you can't fudge at all no should you.

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