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What is the difference in drop, speed, and power between a 55 grain fmj .223 coming out of a 16 in barrel and a 55 grain fmj .22

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  • What is the difference in drop, speed, and power between a 55 grain fmj .223 coming out of a 16 in barrel and a 55 grain fmj .22

    What is the difference in drop, speed, and power between a 55 grain fmj .223 coming out of a 16 in barrel and a 55 grain fmj .223 coming out of a 20 inch barrel?

  • #2
    The velocity difference you achieve by altering the barrel length will depend primarily on the powder you use, the weight of the powder charge and the twist rate of your barrel. Therefore, there is no one speed change you can expect. Faster burning powders complete their combustion in the chamber area and slower burning powders continue to accelerate the bullet all the way to the end of your barrel. Therefore, with slower burning powders, the longer the barrel, the faster you can get the bullet moving before it leaves the barrel.

    As a rule of thumb, you can expect to increase velocity of a .223 55g bullet by around 35-50 fps for each additional inch of barrel. You may have to use slower burning powders to maximize the additional velocity though. Going from a 16 to a 20 inch barrel will increase your velocity about 140-200 fps.

    For discussion purposes, I'll assume that your 55g bullet fired from a 20" barrel would be going 3100 fps rather than 2900 fps. At these velocities, the effect of a longer barrel would be a reduced drop of about 2.5 inches at 300 yards and a reduced time of flight of .03 second and an energy increase of about 150 foot pounds (these depend on your bullet's drag or ballistic coefficient).

    For varmint shooting, I use a 24 inch barrel and achieve a 50g bullet velocity of 3450 fps. I haven't tested it but the same powder coming from a 16 inch barrel would probably achieve around 3050 fps. Believe it or not, for me, this is noticeable and produces about 4 inches less drop at 300 yards. It seems much easier to hit a prairie dog at that range with the longer barrel. I also notice the reduced lead on running coyotes. You wouldn't think so but I notice it.

    I hope this helps answer your question.

    Comment


    • #3
      The velocity difference you achieve by altering the barrel length will depend primarily on the powder you use, the weight of the powder charge and the twist rate of your barrel. Therefore, there is no one speed change you can expect. Faster burning powders complete their combustion in the chamber area and slower burning powders continue to accelerate the bullet all the way to the end of your barrel. Therefore, with slower burning powders, the longer the barrel, the faster you can get the bullet moving before it leaves the barrel.

      As a rule of thumb, you can expect to increase velocity of a .223 55g bullet by around 35-50 fps for each additional inch of barrel. You may have to use slower burning powders to maximize the additional velocity though. Going from a 16 to a 20 inch barrel will increase your velocity about 140-200 fps.

      For discussion purposes, I'll assume that your 55g bullet fired from a 20" barrel would be going 3100 fps rather than 2900 fps. At these velocities, the effect of a longer barrel would be a reduced drop of about 2.5 inches at 300 yards and a reduced time of flight of .03 second and an energy increase of about 150 foot pounds (these depend on your bullet's drag or ballistic coefficient).

      For varmint shooting, I use a 24 inch barrel and achieve a 50g bullet velocity of 3450 fps. I haven't tested it but the same powder coming from a 16 inch barrel would probably achieve around 3050 fps. Believe it or not, for me, this is noticeable and produces about 4 inches less drop at 300 yards. It seems much easier to hit a prairie dog at that range with the longer barrel. I also notice the reduced lead on running coyotes. You wouldn't think so but I notice it.

      I hope this helps answer your question.

      Comment


      • #4
        Sorry for double post. Not sure how that happened.

        Comment

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