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I was recently given a Ruger p95 9mm by my father in law. Very nice gun hardly ever shot and cleaned after every use. When I sho

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  • I was recently given a Ruger p95 9mm by my father in law. Very nice gun hardly ever shot and cleaned after every use. When I sho

    I was recently given a Ruger p95 9mm by my father in law. Very nice gun hardly ever shot and cleaned after every use. When I shoot the gun it chambers rounds fine with no problems but when my wife shoots it it jams almost every time. I took it to a friend of mine who is very knowledgeable in the way of firearms and he said the only thing he can think of is that she doesn't have a firm enough grip on the gun to control the recoil leading it to chamber the next round properly? Has anyone else ever heard of this?

  • #2
    Yep, that sounds like exactly what the problem is. If she allows the gun to move too much, then the slide can't move enough, relative to the frame, to chamber the next round.

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    • #3
      If everything else is the same, it is her grip - too much jump of the barrel will cause a jam. Have her try support from the weak hand - caution her about clearance for the slide.

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      • #4
        A centerfire autoloader requires a good grasp of the weapon. Held with a slack wrist, that lack of firmness provides a "shock absorber" that mollifies or dampens the recoil that would otherwise assist the slide. This is not a difficult matter. She need only exercise her grip using any of the products one finds in a sporting goods store. I keep a wrist exerciser in my vehicle to ease tension through exercise in traffic, or I squeeze the device while waiting for a traffic light to change, and I try to exercise bilaterally, switching hands. It's not a demanding issue, and it's not a difficult matter to get beyond. It may require no more than a modification of grip, holding the piece firmly and higher on the grip.

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        • #5
          As an afterthought, when you discuss this with your wife, be aware that some shooters try to counter this tendency by pushing into the weapon, countering anticipated recoil, and the simply cause the front sight to dive, which is counterproductive. With the awareness that the piece need be held with little more than a firm handshake, watch the pistol as she fires and if the muzzle whips upward when she fires, pivoting about her wrist, then a firmer grip is needed, as we described. Recoil, with proper grip, is delivered on a straight line through the forearm. Practice may resolve it, but encourage her to strengthen her grip through exercise and emphasize proper sight alignment at the instant of discharge.

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          • #6
            This is a very common problem, esp. with women and young children, known as limp wrist syndrome.
            I don't think it is entirely a matter of strength, but of determination to hold the weapon securely.
            In years gone by, some firearms instructors told their students to hold their weapons like a bird, not tightly enough to crush the bird but tightly enough to prevent the bird from flying away. That advice is not applicable to autoloading pistols today.

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            • #7
              that was mentioned in an issue of F&S a month ago i think. it was talking about semi automatic shotgung not functioning when a shooter was wearing too much clothing to firmly mount the gun

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              • #8
                that was mentioned in an issue of F&S a month ago i think. it was talking about semi automatic shotgung not functioning when a shooter was wearing too much clothing to firmly mount the gun

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                • #9
                  99 has it right, all firearms instructors call it "limp wristing" . The first time I told some of my officers that it really offended them. I told them to get over it and showed them how to stop it and we cured the problem.

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                  • #10
                    Sarge that's okay, my father has had to just about pull the trigger for rookie officers during shotgun training and qualifications. Their argument is "It hurts too much", oftentimes said in a whiny tone of voice.
                    My father's opinion of the 12 gauge, "If I could, I would take it with me every time I left the patrol car!".

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                    • #11
                      I always said when I worked if I could only have one gun give me my Rem 870 with its 18 inch barrel. I carried mine full of slugs. After I showed my officers how it didn't measure up with buckshot they all carried slugs in their shotguns. I know of nothing that can handle a one ounce chunk of lead. Mine was accurate as far as hitting a man-size target at 150+ yards even with just a bead on the front for a sight. People think they need rifle sights on a shotgun but my officers proved them different.

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                      • #12
                        Yea Sarge, I've never met a man that survived a 12 gauge slug before. Even if he was wearing a ballistic vest the impact would probably take out.
                        Rifle sights on a shotgun, the closest I have ever come to rifle sights is my grandfather's bolt action Stevens 58, where on the bolt there is a little chunk of steel with lines cut on top of it and a front bead, quite accurate I must say and definitely sweeter shooting than the lightweight pump.

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