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More D-Day Trivia. Who was the first casualty of the invasion? No peeking.

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  • More D-Day Trivia. Who was the first casualty of the invasion? No peeking.

    More D-Day Trivia. Who was the first casualty of the invasion? No peeking.

  • #2
    Lt. Cmdr. Charles E. Madison, a.k.a. James Garner!!!!!
    of course I am only kidding, I do not know.

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    • #3
      Not sure, but i know that Theodore Roosevelt's son died of a heart attack on the beach.

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      • #4
        Not sure, but i know that Theodore Roosevelt's son died of a heart attack on the beach.

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        • #5
          sorry about the double post.

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          • #6
            I'm going to guess it was someone in the 82nd or 101st Airborne Divisions, or someone in the German Army.

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            • #7
              MD, I believe Kermit Roosevelt not only survived D-Day but also won the CMoH. Don't quote me. I'm working on a feeble memory.

              99, I am not sure of the answer to my own question but I was thinking it was a Brit.

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              • #8
                Theodor Roosevelt Jr. survived D-day and on until the 12th of July, the day he was supposed to take command of his own division. He was awarded the CMoH, and is buried in St. Laurent, France beside his brother Quinton who was killed in WWI.
                As to the original question: I have no idea, but give me a minute! Type, type, type.

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                • #9
                  A little off topic but I believe Kermit Roosevelt survived WW II and led the effort by the C.I.A. (possibly still the O.S.S.) that overturned the Prime Minister of Iran and put the Shah of Iran into power. A very interesting story by the way!

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                  • #10
                    With over 150,000 troops, a flotilla of over 5,000 vessels, the 101st and 82nd both dropped behind enemy lines well before the first landing craft was launched, I'm quite certain casualties started before the English Channel was ever crossed.
                    I read the "first" casualty was "Rupert"!

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                    • #11
                      The first casualty (actually death) I can find was of the British 6th Airborne, D company, 2nd Battalion, Major John Howard's command. The 6th Airborne was charged with the herculean task of flying gliders behind enemy lines, capturing Pegasus bridge (a major German supply line) and holding it until invading forces could relieve them. The mission began on June 5th after 10:30 PM. (the earliest mission start I could find). I was not able to obtain the mans name, but he died when the gliders crashed down, as per the usual landing of gliders, several hours before the first boot touched the beaches.

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                      • #12
                        The First Man Killed on D-Day was Lt.Dan Brotheridge of D-Company Royal Eng.

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                        • #13
                          Good question, probably a lot of possible answers but I'd like to know what the answer is too. I have no idea, maybe a pathfinder for the airborne?

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                          • #14
                            Point of Information.

                            In the military, D-Day is the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. The best known D-Day is June 6, 1944 — the day of the Normandy landings — initiating the Western Allied effort to liberate mainland Europe from Nazi occupation during World War II. However, many other invasions and operations had a designated D-Day, both before and after that operation.

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                            • #15
                              Treestand has the answer I was looking for. The British officer killed while over running a bridge hours prior to the invasion.

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