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Scientist are now able, through cloning, to restore some species of extinct wildlife, including mammoths and saber-tooth tigers.

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  • Scientist are now able, through cloning, to restore some species of extinct wildlife, including mammoths and saber-tooth tigers.

    Scientist are now able, through cloning, to restore some species of extinct wildlife, including mammoths and saber-tooth tigers. Forget Jurassic park - it's too far back. I would like to see them restore the Irish Elk, with its 12-foot antler spread. What species of wildlife would you like to see them bring back?

  • #2
    Not for sure how far back you want to go but the carrier pigeon comes to mind.

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    • #3
      I can't imagine a shoot for the passenger pigeon when the flocks darkened the skies, but I don't think today's environment would support them. Hunting the short-faced bear would be the ultimate, and maybe the final, thrill. A dirk toothed cat could have a place on my wall right alongside the aurochs.

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      • #4
        Megalodon meaning big tooth, is regarded as one of the largest and most powerful predators in vertebrate history, and likely had a profound impact on the structure of marine communities. Fossil remains suggest that this giant shark reached a maximum length of fifty two to sixty seven feet.

        Now do you want to go swimming in the ocean? LOL

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        • #5
          Gary - We're going to need a bigger boat.

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          • #6
            Personally, I don't like the idea all that much. They're gone for a reason, science is starting to mess with forces stronger than themselve with this one. Again, just my opinion.

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            • #7
              I also diagree with it but I would like to see the dodo bird brought back.

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              • #8
                The heath hen was eradicated in the U.S. in the 1880's because of excessive market hunting. Its habitat remains largely unchanged.
                That would be welcome addition to our game selection.

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                • #9
                  The thylacine.

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                  • #10
                    I was always fascinated by the sabre-tooth tiger. Not sure where to put it though... perhaps Idaho where it probably wouldn't do any more damage than the wolves are doing. I sure wouldn't want it in my back yard.

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