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Has anybody ever had any problems with conservation officers? I fish on a small lake, and always get checked for license. Once i

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  • Has anybody ever had any problems with conservation officers? I fish on a small lake, and always get checked for license. Once i

    Has anybody ever had any problems with conservation officers? I fish on a small lake, and always get checked for license. Once i got checked by the same officer 3 times in once day. He couldn't find anything each time. He even used the flashing lights the 3rd time.

  • #2
    New Jersey has a law that states all hunters must wear a orange hat while gun hunting.
    Years ago, my little brother was fined for hunting in a cardinal red wool hunting outfit including the pants and jacket. You could see his red clothing a mile away in the woods. The Conservation Officer said it is not fluorescent orange.

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    • #3
      Seems like most of the newer officers have just come from watching 5 straight hours of America's most wanted.
      Sign of the times I guess.

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      • #4
        Like in any line of work, you will run into the occasional jerk, but in my experience most have acted professionally. I’ve been checked quite a few times, mostly when waterfowl hunting on public land, a few times fishing. They’ll check licenses, shells, birds and guns to make sure they are plugged for just three shots. Once they see we are in compliance, they’ve been very friendly.

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        • #5
          It seems like common sense went out the window years ago or at least that is what I saw of just a very small few of our new officers before I retired.

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          • #6
            This is a lesson learned, many years ago. I was a few miles in the bush in watching a hidden old apple tree. At dusk I started walking out when I got near the trail head it was dark. I made the conscious decision to NOT unload as there was snow on the ground and I didn’t want to dig a round out of the snow when I ejected it and I missed it falling with cold hands. I only had a hundred yards to the truck and I could eject over the bed. Sounds reasonable, RIght? Apparently not. That trail head was the ‘entrapment’ zone of a part time game warden. I got a ticket for hunting after dark, when it was obvious I was just walking back to my car and simply didn’t unload. That jerk put me in the same category as jack lighters But, If I didn’t contest and paid the fine my ‘hunting privileges’ would be intact. If I dd protest, I could lose my license for years. I was caught in a ‘fund raising’ expedition by a part time warden trying to justify his part time salary. I had lost a lot of respect for conservation officers that day.


            However; to be 100% fair I have had very positive experiences since then. Whenever I get stopped and they check my license and safety equipment (which they have ever right and business doing), they have been extremely helpful, telling me what lures others are using , sometimes stocking schedules and where he saw a buck last week on patrol. They seem to want you be successful and enjoy yourself.

            Moral of the story; 1 jerk does not a profession make, and ALWAYS UNLOAD before you get to the trailhead.

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            • #7
              Canvasback, unless you have done something in the past to deserve a bad reputation, I suggest you call the head office and make a complaint. You don't pay good money for your license just to be hassled all day long. Obviously, fishing is the objective. Now, if there is some reason why they might be targeting you ... well, it can sometimes take quite a long time to outlive a bad reputation. Kinda part of the atonement for sins that one has to put up with for a while.

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              • #8
                Three men from Maine caught in the act, by the New Jersey Fish and Game Conservation Officers. Check out the story in the link below.

                www.outdoorhub.com/news/dep-conservation-officers-net-three-maine-men-in-illegal-eel-harvesting-operation-in-atlantic-county/

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                • #9
                  All of my dealings with CO's have been positive. They are spread pretty thin in CO and MN where I have done my hunting. If you are in compliance they usually are on their way pretty quickly. I have been checked fishing only once in 36 yrs, it was on the Flaming Gorge in Utah. Never been checked in MN as I don't go to the big lakes very much.

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                  • #10
                    Had a pleasant conversation with a conservation officer in Colorado a few years ago. After about 1/2 hour of talking I had to ask him if he would check my tag. I didn't want to spend $550 for nothing.

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                    • #11
                      On my Hunt-Lease We have one or two Fl-Wild life Officers come on to hang-out and have the Run of the Camp, They also keep an eye on all the Camp Equipment, and Check people "None Members" Guest card I.D. For up-to date Status,They have gotten some Trespasser's in the past with a call to me or officers of the club. we have had issues with the local sheriff officers that don't know game laws.

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                      • #12
                        I don't think that your opinion of us is something that you should be proud of. If someone flipped me the bird I was probably going to dig deep trying to find something to charge him with, otherwise I wouldn't and would have had a friendly conversation with him and given him a chance to go get his license. You are right your actions got your friend a citation. That was the wrong thing to do. Real smart.

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                        • #13
                          Most of my encounters with F&W offices have been pleasant. When I see them approach, I usually lean my firearm against a tree or blind and get my dog on a lead if waterfowl hunting. Nothing puts an officer more at ease than a weapon out of arm's reach and a big dog under control.

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                          • #14
                            Have two bad experiences, both in Arizona. That's less than a 1% rate of trouble, but boy that 1% can hurt!

                            Once in 1998, I had a coveted late-season (December) bull tag for a 5-day hunt. I was stopped four times by four different officers to check my tag. The first two days had already been lost because of blizzard conditions. Each stop took 30 minutes because state laws at that time made them run everyone through a computerized crime database, and also through the Child Support database. I was ready to scream bloody murder by the third stop, and I asked them to call in my license plate and say I've been checked enough, leave this one alone, but they said they can't do that. Obviously.

                            The second time was the very next year (1999) in southern AZ. I had harvested an 86-inch mountain lion. Game laws at that time required you to turn over a tooth within 10 days of the kill, and report the kill to G&F. At camp, a game warden was driving through, so I thought I'd save time and report it to him. BIG MISTAKE! He needed a tooth, and said he'd run it by the local office to remove it without breaking the jaw, and return the lion the next day. Instead, he never returned it. After lodging a formal complaint and the state agency investigated, they gave me a formal report that said that there had been a "miscommunication" at the office, and that my lion had been burned in their oven because it had somehow been labeled as being rabid. The department offered nothing to make up for my huge loss, and in fact made it clear they would vigorously defend their actions in court when I intoned that their "report" would not be the end of this story. That's when I lost my trust of the state system in AZ, and began avoiding AZ G&F officers.

                            I've never had a whiff of trouble in other states covering dozens of big-game hunts.

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                            • #15
                              WA Mtnhunter;

                              Leaning a firearm against anything is an instant citation in some states I have hunted. They want it flat on the ground when not in your hand. The theory is that they can slide off can discharge (Not sure how true that is), but that is the regulation.

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