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Ok, one gun I own the barrel has a stamp on it that says Model 98. I do believe that it is german because it has the eagle hold

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  • Ok, one gun I own the barrel has a stamp on it that says Model 98. I do believe that it is german because it has the eagle hold

    Ok, one gun I own the barrel has a stamp on it that says Model 98. I do believe that it is german because it has the eagle holding the swastika on it, but I've been looking around and I haven't been able to find a Model 98 that looked even remotely close. And something that I found wierd was there are stamps that look to be Japanese on it as well so I don't know what to think. Oh and I don't know if this helps but the serial number is 2625.

  • #2
    It is probably a Mauser model 1898. The Germans and other coutries used them during WWI and WWII. If it is a bolt action with a long wood stock then I am probably right. What is the chambering (caliber).You probably shouldn't have said the serial # just so u know.

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    • #3
      I agree with hjohn.

      Skeeb, Is yours an 8mm by chance?

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      • #4
        Honestly I do not know the caliber because the rifle was passed down through my family and it is never fired so sorry.

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        • #5
          The eagle with swastika limits at least that portion of the rifle to having been utilized during the period of the Third Reich's rule. I suppose it possibly have been somehow diverted to the Japanese as there was interchange of supplies during the late thirties and early forties among the Axis powers. Without knowing such things as barrel length and chambering it is difficult to say much more. Is the bolt handle straight or bent, what do the sights look like, are portions of the serial number on any other part of the rifle, is there a lug for a bayonet? Seems to me that the Japanese made some Mauser copies, not to be confused with Arasaki M-77s. This would not account for the swastika unless they employed a German manufactured part.

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          • #6
            From the little you've said, it sounds like a M98 Mauser but the eagle/swastica should be on the front left of the receiver, not the barrel. One of the most recognizable components of the Mauser action is the hinged bolt release that sits on the left rear of the action. When you pull the front of the hinged little block out away from the action, you can remove the bolt from the action. If it has this, it is a Mauser of some kind. It could have any barrel or stock on it too. Many vintage Mausers were sporterized over the last 50 years or so and if yours was, it could have any kind of barrel, trigger, or stock upgrade. Google M98 and take a look at the actions to see.

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            • #7
              Sorry about the lack of info, it has a 21 inch barrel, the barrel however looks like a plain deer rifle barrel with no bayonet attatchments or even an iron sight. However, I believe the barrel is an original because it has the symbol of the Third Reich on it. And the serial number is on the barrel and also the action of the rifle. It also has the hinged "block".

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              • #8
                Thank you DakotaMan it is an M98.

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                • #9
                  21 inch plain barrel with the black eagle on it? This keeps getting weirder.

                  Have you or anyone you know been criticized or judged because they own a "nazi" gun?

                  I have a WWII Luger, about as "nazi" as it gets, and I'm German and proud of it, BUT, I get no thrills out of it being a "nazi" gun or anything like that. I almost wish it wasn't affiliated in that way. It's just a hell of a gun. The only thing i get off on is the fact that it is a masterpiece of engineering, machining, and gunmaking. The performance and accuracy is on par with any modern handgun. It has literally NEVER jammed, stovepiped, failed to feed, etc., and I've fired it in temps ranging from way below zero to about 102 degrees, at all angles, and as fast as I can pull the trigger. Nothing. Just BANG and holes in whatever I'm pointing at. I have heard that they fail easily because they get dirty easily, but I guess I've never let it get even close to dirty. Who would?

                  I also would like to find out what the deal is with this gun. It's nickel and stainless, with smooth wood grips, not the usual blued with checkered grips. I assume that it's a navy issue, but It's the only stainless one I've seen. I guess I should go to the answers tool with this.

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                  • #10
                    As they said, the '98 Mauser was made over 45 years in dozens of different configurations. There were also contract rifles sold to other countries (like the shorter Turkish carbine), plus all the civilian conversions.

                    If you have the eagle on it, you also should have a code near this. The Waffenamt will tell you a great deal more about this. Mine was a winter bg44 model that wasn't in the greatest shape, but with a little work looked and fired great. Here's a link to Waffenamt...

                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waffenamt_codes

                    As for the 4-digit serial number, it doesn't mean anything. That was a "group number" in production, and only useful in small-unit armories. There are probably 50,000 made with that same number. If you need parts, though, there is a supplier (ironically, in New Jersey) that can search for matching group numbers.

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                    • #11
                      To shane...
                      Not weird. When converting many military rifles, the front was cut off, then refinished with a plain blade sight. You'll also see a few military Mauser stocks (with the metal hole in the stock) cut down and refinished in the front.

                      The truly weird thing is your Luger description. Several things don't overlap... or overlap too much.

                      Yes, the Luger is one of the best feeling pistols ever made. I love them. That said...

                      There are almost no WWII Lugers (at least not by any measurable quantity). The bulk were made by 1918, then the treaty that destroyed Germany's economy stopped virtually all production of weapons. There were a few made for export of various German rifles and pistols to try and bring in some money. 9mm Lugers were from 1928 on.

                      When the nazis came to power, and rebuilding the armed forces began, the one-at-a-time, hand fit and finish of the Luger, with the temperamental feeding issue, led to issuing the P38 (and later, FN Hi-Powers after taking Belgium).

                      There were a few made for officers during this time, and they still had a very tiny wartime production, although these do not look as finished as any other ones. If I recall, even this stopped by 1942.

                      Stainless or nickel military issue is unheard of. So on one hand, you could have an extremely valuable high-ranking officer's present, or a plated-after-the-fact piece, or a more recent Stoeger.

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                      • #12
                        I think it's a WWII Luger for the fact that it has the marks of the 3rd reich on it. I'll have to post in detail about this gun.

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                        • #13
                          hijohn429,
                          Why did you say he shouldn't mention serial number?

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                          • #14
                            Because if he shoots an ATF agent trying to take his guns in the next few years, he doesn't want his numbers in print.

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                            • #15
                              Now if one of us had that Luger made in .45 ACP for the American trials, in fact I believe that there were originally three of them. As I remember one of these P-08s was auctioned off for a million or so a few years ago. Also was not there an American company who made a batch of hand assembled Lugers a few years ago? I remember that they were stainless but of course would not have been marked in the manner Shane describes. Jeff4066 probably knows about this right off the top of his head.

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