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How many Vietnam vets are out there? Or your Dad or Mom? Do you even care? What about vets of the sandbox?

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  • CoyoteHunter
    replied
    Well, I've never had the opportunity to go to the Wall, wish I could though. My family has a long military history. One of my very distant grandfathers was one of 115 killed in the Battle of Bunker Hill. In the Civil War , I had a distant Uncle who fought for the Union, and his 4 sons served for the Confederates. In an odd twist, he was responsible for the death of all 4 of the sons. Also, you may have heard of one of my distant cousins, Andrew Johnson, 17th president of the US, and the first to be impeached. Probably not the best thing for a president to be remembered for. My grandfather was in the Marines in WWII, and served in the South Pacific. Then my dad served for several years in intelligence, stationed in West Germany. My 2nd cousin was an artillery man in Vietnam, and lastly, my brother served in the Navy during the First Gulf War.

    Thanks for the great post WAM, and thanks for your service and all veterans' service.

    Leave a comment:


  • mspl8sdcntryboy
    replied
    My Grandfather served as a Gunny in 'Nam, he doesn't talk about it very often so I don't know much about where or when; my great uncle also served in 'Nam as a tank driver. I have family members that have served in just about every war since the revolution, some have even been labeled as spies, we have a man in the family tree that signed his loyalty with both the British and American people during the revolution, he also used more than one name. I currently have two cousins, one LT. one Capt.-Army Rangers, serving; I too would serve but cannot enlist in the armed forces of a country that seems to have no idea of where it's loyalties lie or what really is at stake in this troubling time.

    Leave a comment:


  • ITHACASXS
    replied
    I know time races by, but it was just yesterday when the Vietnam vets were older brothers and young uncles, not grandfathers. God Bless them all.

    Leave a comment:


  • Edward J. Palumbo
    replied
    Buckhunter,
    Best wishes to your youngest. He will never be without brothers and sisters through the Corps. I am still in regular contact with guys I served with in the '60s, and we're still very much in each other lives.

    Safado,
    In the '60s, there was considerable polarity about the war in Viet Nam because many college-age Americans were threatened with the draft and felt they were being dragged into a war they didn't support. As for Jane Fonda, that wench didn't develop as an issue until 1972, when she visited North Vietnam and posed on an antiaircraft gun and commiserated with her Communist colleagues. I will tell you, the media (TV, movies) depicted many RVN veterans as "psychologically disturbed" and a threat to society. Prior to the all-volunteer military (1973), a portion of our military personnel were conscripted (drafted), and I won't discuss that issue here. I joined the Marine Corps after high school graduation at age 17 and didn't attend college classes until my first enlistment ended. My peers who pressed on to college dreaded the draft, and it was a divisive issue on campuses across the country. Society was relatively unenlightened during the '60s-'70s, and many couldn't distinguish between the war and the warriors. From my perspective, I'm thankful for the Corps and the guys with whom I worked.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Safado
    Jane Fonda had a lot to do with the way Vets were treated. The anti-war sentiment ran high and when i returned to US was advised to fly in civilian clothes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Storm Hall
    replied
    Nobody in my family served in Vietnam but my father and myself both served in OIF my father in 2007 and myself in 2010

    Leave a comment:


  • hengst
    replied
    Thanks to everyone that served during those harsh times. My father was in 173rd ABN 65-66.

    I was in Iraq 3 tours, my first tour our Bn. was attached to 173rd so that was kind of neat since that was my late fathers unit.

    Leave a comment:


  • Safado
    replied
    WAM,
    Thanks again for the post. As I stated I was too young but I remember and I'll never forget! Maybe it was because I was too young but I never understood why the returning Vietnam Vets were so mistreated.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    70-71. 39TH IPSD, 173rd Abn. LZ English, Bong Son, RVN.

    Leave a comment:


  • buckhunter
    replied
    EJP, I did not know you were a Marine. I have 3 children, one a high school science teacher and football coach and the other getting her PHD but I could not be prouder of my youngest who will be leaving for the Marine Corp in April. I tell him all the time I envy him.

    Leave a comment:


  • bass bomber
    replied
    My grandpa served in the Army in Vietnam and my other grandpa was in the Air Force in the 1950's. Several family members served in WW2 and beyond that I dont know much. I plan on enlisting in the Marine Corps when Im older.

    Leave a comment:


  • Edward J. Palumbo
    replied
    I served with 1st Marine Division (USMC) as a field communicator in and around Chu Lai in 1966-67. Visited the Traveling Wall when it came to Fort Vancouver, WA, and that seemed to take a lot out of me. A few years later, I revisited it when it came to the Willamette National Cemetery in the Portland area, and brought my son with me because he was in high school and trying to make a decision about what to do after HS graduation.
    Using the internet and the directory, it wasn't difficult to find the names I sought, and I told him about the guys. He looked about and saw other vets my age, many emotionally affected by the visit, and there was a point I wanted to make; it's not a video game, it's a serious commitment.
    My son is now serving on his second deployment to the Gulf aboard the USS John C. Stennis, and I'm proud of the job he's doing as an aircraft electronics technician.

    Leave a comment:


  • Del in KS
    replied
    WAM thanks for posting this information. Been to the wall twice. That is a sad, sad experience. You already know my history with the Army. See you in October under happier circumstances.

    BTW My former brother in law never got to meet his father. His parents got married before his dad shipped out. His dad was killed by a Jap hand grenade on Okinawa. I don't know if he even knew the wife was pregnant before he was killed.

    Leave a comment:


  • deerhunterrick
    replied
    1971 to 1972 most of that time was playing peekaboo in and hide& seek. Worst 400 days of my life. I still have nightmares and wake up sweating. Caught myself getting ready to elbow my wife in midflight couple times. We don't talk about it much. From there I went to Korea then state side 6 months later. Finished my duties @ Wurtsmith AFB siting in a tower. Been to the wall once. Brought back far to many memories for me to ever go back. I went in on the buddy system with 5 other buddies I went to school with. I'm the only one living now. The first we lost in boot camp,3 to agent orange the other is listed as mia.. We just don't go there. nice post Wam,it's nice to know some never forget

    Leave a comment:


  • Sarge01
    replied
    I served a tour with the 390 Fighter Wing (The Gunfighters) out of Danang. I have made 2 trips to the Wall. The first trip was a very hard trip to make. A non Vietnam Vet can't imagine what a moving experience it is when you try to approach that Wall. I stood within sight of the Wall for along time before I could go down to it. I was lucky to have my daughter with me for support. That first time approaching the Wall is one of the hardest things I have ever done. I knew alot of my buddies on the Wall and I traced my first cousin's name for his Son that he never saw and gave it to him. My state of WV did have the highest casulty rate of deaths per capita for the war. Reguardless of what people say about Vietnam Vets , till the day I die I am extremely proud to be a Vietnam Vet and to serve my country. Most of us were't misfits like we were protrayed to be by the media and the public.

    Leave a comment:

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