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Tell me about your run-ins with snakes. I nearly stepped on a big Diamondback while deer hunting in Florida when I was 13 years

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  • stevelarsen690
    replied
    i was bite a month ago by a pairie rattler in riverton wy and had to have the first ever faciotomy in wyoming..29 viles of anti venom...i guess there only two other cases of people having to have faciotomy

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  • Happy Myles
    replied
    I've heard that Namibia has the largest variety of poisonous snakes. Have absolutely no interest in personally checking the veracity of this statement.

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  • peter
    replied
    my dad has some could ones but i really only have two. one is me and my dad were cokmin from a hike and a copperhead took a bite at both of us, that my sound dull but im not good at strories. the other on isme and my dad were in a canoe and my sister in a kayke. a snake was following the kakak and shwe freaked out and just flew through the lake at full speed. she looked klike an idiot

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  • Del in KS
    replied
    Those are all good ones especially the one about walking on water. My deceased bro-in-law liked to joke that he "put on his Jesus shoes and walked across that lake". Loved the Nurse too.

    I can't remember many of the snakes in 'Nam. Australia is loaded with dangerous serpents also.

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  • ishawooa
    replied
    One more yarn. A local nurse told me that she and her husband were driving back the day after a party in a distant mountain village when she developed a belly cramp. They pulled the car off the road in Wyoming fashion due to lack of public facilities. She rushed into the sagebrush, pulled down her pants, and began to squat. Her husband quickly directed her to a different spot so she would not be in view of passersby on the highway. Just as she squated the second time she glanced down and directly between her legs was a prairie rattler...coiled. She spontaneously leaped forward with all her might leaving her open healed clog shoes, one on each side of the snake. Her husband wondered "What the hell?" He ran over to her thinking she had experienced a seizure or something similiar. She was covered in dirt and still had the belly cramp. The snake was angry and had to be run off with a long stick which is difficult to locate in the desert just to get her shoes back. She figured that things worked out pretty well otherwise on the front page of the little local paper would be a headline stating LOCAL NURSE BIT ON ASS.

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  • ishawooa
    replied
    Del I can't remember the names of those poisonous snakes that sometimes hang from tree limbs in Nam. Do you recollect or do I have to look it up? Nasty suckers.
    I know others have experienced similiar things but the kid and I were wading in Shell Creek near the Wyoming community of the same name trying to catch a few trout one summer day. I rolled up my Wranglers and the kid had on shorts, no waders. After a bit I looked up and saw two rattlesnakes riding on top of the current headed straight for us. I'm sure we came close to walking on water in an effort to get out of their way. Their heads and tails were held high when they rushed past us. I don't think I have not worn good waders ever since no matter how hot it might be.

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  • ishawooa
    replied
    My wierdest experience came in Mississippi in about 1975. A couple friends and I were floating in a flat bottom boat down a muddy creek. Our purpose was to shoot some of the thousands of turtles that lived there with our .357 revolvers. Suddenly on one side of the boat a huge snake rolled out of the water, appeared to be 12-15 feet long and as much as 6-8 inches thick in the middle. We were so startled that we sat in silence and waited for him to surface again. This time we let loose a volley of 125 HPs but apparently did not hit him. This happened again so instantly that we were still reloading our M-19's so no one shot. That was the last we saw of it. Until this day I am convinced that it was a python that someone had turned loose and we accidently encountered. Oddly enough about a year later a couple of my friends roped and captured a turtle in the same creek which was estimated to weigh as much as 300 pounds. You could hold a broom stick in front of his nose and he would bite it into two pieces. A representative from the Memphis Zoo came to look at the turtle but rejected it saying that they had bigger and older ones of the same species. He figured it was in excess of 100 years old. My friends took the turtle back to the creek and released it. It might still be living there.

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  • CPT BRAD
    replied
    I was about 10 and going out to feed the dogs before school one morning I opened up our wood door and storm door and just happend to notice a brown spot one the threshold as I stepped across. I looked down and there was about a 1 foot copper head that had spent the night coiled against the wood door. I about hit my head on the top of the door I jumped so high. Any way that one didn't make it back to the woods!

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  • Happy Myles
    replied
    My Grandmother died at 99. She slipped and broke her hip while bringing in kindling during a blizzard and never recovered. She used to keep a garden hoe at both the front and the back doors to use as a cane and to kill rattlesnakes. She owned a couple of guinea fowl and two turkeys. They were her watch dogs, when the snakes showed up looking for mice or gophers in her yard these birds would put up a fearful racket. She would summarily, chop the trespassing rattlers head off with the closest hoe.

    I suggested she was to old for this pastime. She cackled, and replied "at my age this all the excitement I get."

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  • Beekeeper
    replied
    Del,

    My closest call was to a copperhead. I had cut a trail through a thick, grown up slough out to and island in a swamp. I had the idea of hunting a big buck that was trailing the middle of the island.

    I had worked all morning and returned about 3 PM to go in a hunt. On my way in I noted that I'd left a small willow branch about the diameter of my thumb and about 3 feet long laying in the middle of the trail. I stopped and used the toe of my boot (thank God!) to flip it off the path. As soon as my toe touched the limb a very large copperhead (almost 3 feet long) which was buried up in the leaves under the branch coiled and struck in one motion, luckily it hit the hard toe of my boot... It immediately recoiled and was cocked and locked ready for another strike. Big buck be damned, I leveled the muzzle of my .308 about 10 inches from the snakes nose and let go. The bullet missed but the muzzle blast frazzled the first 6-7 inches of snake and blew a mixing bowl size hole in the soft ground. I went back to the truck in order to catch up with my heart and for a change of under garments...

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  • 007Dom
    replied
    when I went to Michagan me and my cuzin were catching frogs, and we saw a huge snake about 4-5 feet long and me and my cuzin both have pet snakes so we kind of had an experience with them. so we tried to catch it. Man it was impossible it had so many hole it kept going in. So after a while we lost sight of it. so we just went back to catching frogs. Then later when we were leaveingwe saw it again. and again we try to catch it. but it didnt work. it was black then had a lime green stripe on its side. I had never seen anything like it. it was the wierdest snake I ever saw.

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  • bonnier-admin_2
    replied
    habu's

    ONE BAD SNAKE!

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  • teufelhunden
    replied
    Clay, I too ran into the banded sea snake in Okinawa, mostly diving at the "Tombs". I spoke to an old Japanese fisherman who told me in broken english "snake bite, grandkids die".

    And who can forget the habu's up at NTA.

    Leave a comment:


  • slothman
    replied
    At my Grand parents ranch we have two houses, a new one that they built about 8 years ago for their retirement and an old one built in the early 50's that no one uses any more accept for my Father and myself. This old house is on the very edge of a clearing within 5 yards of heavy brush. The bathroom in this old house is set up so that when you shower a window lets you look right out into the brush.
    One afternoon I went to go take a shower after spending the morning fencing, just about the time I got my self nice and soapy A big coral snake crawls across the ledge on the outside of the window. I tried to jump out of the shower but slipped and knocked the wind out of myself.

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  • bonnier-admin_2
    replied
    August 1981 New Mexico hunting Jackrabbits and Coyotes. Literally straddled a Diamond back (http://www.venomousreptiles.org/pages/dbcatrox.jpg) and it was pissed. After doing instant thinking, Choice #1 Take the rifle butt and hit it in the head and risk the chance of missing! NOPE!!, Choice #2 jump and still get hit, NOPE!! Choice #3 stay still HELL NO!! or #4 and this is it, fall straight back quick draw my 44 mag with Keith Style 255 grain cast loaded with 21 grains of 2400 and shoot from the hip and risk shrapnel rather than a snake bite. It will take 45 minutes to get to the truck and another 1 1/2 hours to get to the nearest road.

    All 4 of my hunting buddies turned when they heard the distinct sound of my 44 Mag go off and turned to look in my direction to see me lying on my back with a ton of dust swirling around me. They yelled Clay you OK; I don’t know I just straddled a snake! The next thing I knew they were over top of me pulling my boots off and pant legs up to check if I was hit. I was lucky, the Diamondback wasn’t the bullet almost severed the head completely off at the base still attached by a thread of skin.

    Leave a comment:

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