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Here's another chance to tell your interesting hunting or war stories. No story is too mundane-the only stupid story is the one

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  • Here's another chance to tell your interesting hunting or war stories. No story is too mundane-the only stupid story is the one

    Here's another chance to tell your interesting hunting or war stories. No story is too mundane-the only stupid story is the one not told.

  • #2
    I already told two of my best at "camp in Ak", you know where to look, thanks again for the chance to tell them.

    Comment


    • #3
      heres one. a war story..not mine, but a story that an old veteran told me and a few buddies. he said they were in korea or vietnam or something. and him and two other guys were camped out on this hill just outside of a town. they for some reason were on the bottom of the hill, away from the town. they saw a dog on the top of the hill and they had this bazooka. so the old veteran walked slowly to the top of the hill and shot at the dog with the big old bazooka. he actually missed, and the rocket fired into the town and hit the church. he said the church collapsed and everything. not really a hunting story, but it's interesting. he said war stories.

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      • #4
        In 1971 I was a Squad leader in C Company 501st Infantry, 101st Abn Div. My platoon was on patrol in mountainous jungle near Phu Bai (pronounced Foo by) Viet Nam. It was during the rainy season and on the day in question Typhoon Hester hit the country doing extensive damage and flooding. Anyway my platoon was following a nountain trail thru dense jungle. The other squad leader Sgt Bone was on the point. "Bones" was carrying am M-60 machinegun. The trail snaked around the side of the mountain and then switchbacked over the top. Late in the afternoon it was raining and blowing hard. The wind came in huge gusts like ocean waves that roared thru the dead trees overhead killed by agent orange a few years earlier. We came to a huge Teak with our trail wrapped around it's roots. When Sgt Bone peeked around the trunk of this behemoth he found a viet Cong enemy base camp. There was only one VC there and he immediately ran down an escape trail. Bones lit up the place with a belt of 7.62 ball. We moved in and knocked down the grass thatched huts. Near nightfall found us on the switchback moving toward the mountain top. The wind was really cranking up and rain came down horizontal. Every few minutes the sound of falling timber could be heard above the wind. We stopped for a rest and the hill was so steep you could sit facing downhill and lean back on your pack for a rest. I was doing this when a huge gust came, there was a cracking sound above followed by a chill running down my spine. I looked uphill at another huge dead tree and saw a broken limb crash to the ground off to my right. A wave of relief washed over my body. Then the next even bigger gust struck, there was another loud cracking sound, then a shout "lookout it's falling"!! and a tree at least a hundred feet tall and ten feet in diameter came down. I shouted lookout below and jumped to my left just in time. Thank God for steel helmets. Six men got knocked to the ground, five lucky enough to not be seriously injured. One young soldier was caught on a high spot of ground and badly crushed. We had to cut his pack up and drag him from under the massive trunk. The medic gave him morphine but he had a broken pelvis and internal injuries. We spent the night right there as he could not be moved and medivac choppers could not fly. That was the longest night of my life. It was pitch black but the was an erie phosphorous (spelling?) glow to some blades of grass that gave you a sense of where the ground was. It blew and rained hard all night at about 3 am one of my men came to wake me for guard watch. The night was so black he missed my covered hammock and walked outside our perimeter into the jungle. Finally guessing he had gone too far he reversed his path walking straight toward me. Now back then I was a light sleeper and footsteps on wet ground woke me. By the time that man was a few feet away my safety was off, M-16 aimed and slack taken up on the trigger. At the absolute last moment before my sear released a voice said spzzzt spzzt Sarge, Sarge. I slipped the gun on safe and answered never telling that man how close he came. The next morning the storm passed and we got the injured man out on a medivac bird. That kid had only been in 'Nam a couple weeks.

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        • #5
          I really don't have any bad stories to tell, luckily. While in basic training we all had to learn to throw grenades. One kid next to my station had never fired a gun and when the instructor put the grenade in his hand and the kid pulled the pin he got lock-jaw, literally, and he could do nothing but stand there with a live grenade. The instructor grabbed it and threw it in the pit and grabbed the kid and dropped to the ground. The blast hit me hard but harmless. The only other life threatening thing I encountered was at Ft. Bragg when an infantry firepower demonstration was to be put on to impress some politicians. Me and some buddies was told to requisite our M16's and taken to site. We were put in foxholes three abreast and told to shoot, full auto. Above us, barely, was a senior NCO on a .50 cal blasting as he felt. I got a crease in my helmet and knocked out of action by one of his rounds.
          Otherwise I had a mild military career.

          Comment


          • #6
            As for "war" storys go. I got to see the U.S.S New Jersey "fire up" one time. In case you don't know her
            She was one of the most decorated ships in history.
            She fought in W.W.II,Korea,Vietnam,and in my case off the coast of Lebanon(Benoville/ Be no women,Be no liberty,Be no fun off Be no ville).
            She used the 16in.gun, and shot "bullets" that weighed
            as much as a V/W Bug(2200lbs of High Explosive)that would put a hole in the ground 40ft. across/20ft. deep.
            Now imagine 9 of them going off in order.
            Also got to see the Phalanx(spelling?) gun on my ship a couple of times. You've probably seen one of these before this one fired a 7.62mm round at 6000 rounds per minute(do the math). First time I heard it I was on deck doing catapult maintence and thought it was a storm(lightning/thunder).

            Comment


            • #7
              It was July 1 2008, in north western Afghanistan. We had been on a patrol in our vehicles for 4 days. We meet with a local police chief who says there is a wanted man a few clicks away. Only one man but they are scared to get him. This sounded fishy to me. We proceed to head to this village, one the way the police begin firing at nothing saying they saw taliban but nothing. We begin to clear a few villages but turn up nothing. Just as we started to head back we saw three motorcycles with AK's head in another village. We clear that village but nothing. As we begin leave yet again after 3 hours of clearing and chasing "pink elephants." Out of no where a huge blast hits 10 feet behind my vehicle. The first of many mortars. We begin to scatter and try to fight. Rockets begin air bursting all around us. As we start shooting the spotters, machine gun fire opens up from three sides. Chaos ensues but we were prepared. Just two days prior the Spanish got hit in the same spot and ran back to their FOB with out firing a shoot. Thats not how we fight. We begin to charge up the hill with our vehicles. I am the last one, when my MRAP tilts quickly almost rolling. Quick I throw it in reverse jamming us on the mud but saved us from rolling. The MRAP being so heavy collapsed a small road on top of a spring. Every one is ok but we are still taking mortars and rockets. We bunker along a small wall and begin directing targets. The rest of the team has pushed up the hill and taken fire. We are by ourself with the afghan army, not the best fighters. An ANA soldier with a rpg hops over a wall, we start to get away from him when his rocket discharges. The rocket thankfully went away from me but was loud as h*ll. In all my vehicle is buried and we take 3 more hours to get it out. When we begin to leave my vehicle was over heatng bad. It was 2200 at night by this time, intel gets passed that both exits out of the valley are mined. Thats when they told me I was lead vehicle, we begin driving on NVG's. When another MRAP got stuck in a wet spot in the dried up riverbed. We try until 0100 to get it out, we pull back and start security for the night watching the MRAP. In all we have been in the kill zone for atleast 7 hours now. We each get a hour of sleep. At 0430 sun rise comes and we are able to get out the vehicle by 0800. We eventually make it back to base with out any more incidents. We had no Marines injured, but had 5 Afghan Army soldiers injured. One got shot in the back of the leg, another burns from the RPG, and 3 that got injured from their 50 cal machine gun.

              Comment


              • #8
                I have posted a picture under my name of my MRAP stuck, check it out.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Nice pics, usmc. That one kind of looks like some stuff I've hunted in Colo.(Merriams). Thanks for serving/sharing. Semper Fi sir. Thanks again Del.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    usmcturkey,
                    Please explain the military definition of 'click' is.
                    Man, on your post you use to many abbreviations. It seems to have changed from my 70's military.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      A "click" is a kilometer, metric don't cha know....While I served, I am grateful not to have any of such tales to tell.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thats just one of a few stories, some of the others are just to graphic to be sharing on something like this. The things that happened over there I will never forget, nor will my scar allow me to.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Del,

                          Here is another hunting story.

                          In my last year of college I found a public land deer hunting "honey hole" of sorts. The spot had at one time been a rice growing area complete with dikes and levees. In the hundred or so years since, the old levees had broken and the area had grown up in hardwoods. It was surrounded by thick cut over pine and you could only get to it by water. The first morning I found the area I killed a nice 8 point buck. My first of the season and with 2 more tags, one for a buck and one antlerless I was juiced! Sign was every where and the hunting looked to be easy as the deer trailed along the top of the old levees.

                          Being a college student and a poor one at that, my room mate and I did a lot of hunting and fishing to keep higher quality food on the table. My roomie had recently purchased a 20 gauge Savage pump shotgun that came with both a bird and a deer barrel. He had also run across a deal on Winchester paper hull rifled slugs. The shotgun grouped the slugs really well and he was anxious to get to the deer woods with it.

                          The following Saturday found us on the old levees before dawn. I set my roommate in the shell of an old oak at the intersection of two levees absolutely eat up with deer sign. I went off to my spot, a blow down with a nice comfy spot between two big branches. Well concealed, I waited out first light. Deer began to move back from their feeding areas as the sky lightened and in about 20 minutes along came a wide 6 point chasing after an entire herd of does, 8 in all. The shot was too easy and I had my second buck in as many weeks. At the shot the does all bailed off the top of the levee down into the old grown up paddies and off toward my roomie.

                          I was sure he would get a shot and I soon heard the 20 fire. Then he fired again and again and again and again! As the law allowed for deer, he had pulled the plug and loaded with five slugs.

                          I got down from my perch and checked on my buck and tagged and gutted him out quickly. I then made my way over to my room mates ambush point where I found him calmly smoking a Marlboro..., "We got problems.” "What do you mean we?" I replied. He nodded toward the edge of the levee. I strolled over and literally found a pile of does, 5 in all, all shot through the base of the neck!

                          The does had tried to climb up the levee bank at the trail crossing, the first had gotten buy, but he was ready for the second... and third and forth, ya'll get the point. He related that he thought it was the same deer trying to come up over the levee and he kept shooting each time a head and neck would pop up, not believing the deer would keep coming up the steep bank with all the shooting!

                          He was in a pickle. At that time my state only allowed three deer per year. They could be all does or any combination as long as no more than two bucks were killed. We were hunting on doe day but even with my remaining tag he was still one short. Both of us being raised to do the right thing we decided to take the untagged doe out and he would answer to the consequences "if" we got caught...

                          We gutted, tagged and loaded all the deer in my Jon boat. What a pile! Thank goodness it was a wide bottom boat as we still had a safe amount of free board. Carefully back down stream we went and guess who was waiting at the ramp... you guessed it the local warden.

                          Roomie told his story to an unsmiling regulatory face. The warden turned to me and asked if I tagged one of the deer for him, to which I replied a feeble "yes sir." He then smiled and walked to his truck. Upon his return he produced a tag which he told us he had confiscated from a fellow who had two sets of them in his possession. He gave my roommate the tag and told us he didn't want to find either one of us doing anything but fishing for the rest of the season. "You boys have plenty of freezer meat, now get out of here and get to skinning; I anyone asks you haven’t seen me..."

                          I guess he knew 2 hungry college kids when he saw them!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Beekeeper,

                            That story was Awesome! I laughed my @$$ off at your friends mild reaction of "We've got problems" because I have a friend who would react the EXACT same way as your roomate did. "We got problems." LOL

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks HFS! He is still the same today! He's not bothered in the least by anything...

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