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No one under the age of fifty really understands what Memorial Day is about. To them it's about BBQ and Party. What? Someone die

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  • No one under the age of fifty really understands what Memorial Day is about. To them it's about BBQ and Party. What? Someone die

    No one under the age of fifty really understands what Memorial Day is about. To them it's about BBQ and Party. What? Someone died for me, really?---Memorial Day- Jim in Mo

  • #2
    I never served - but I have been to the beaches of Normandy, the Vietnam Wall, Okinawa, Gettysburg, etc. I understand that sacrifices were made for me, but I realize that I will never have a true comprehension of those sacrifices.

    However, I would bet that there are a fair number of veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan who would take great offense to your generalization.

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    • #3
      If I could give you +500 for your post fezzant I would.

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      • #4
        Well said fezzant.

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        • #5
          what fezzant said, I personally have 4 relatives in Arlington and many others in other military graves. Your generalizations are offensive, sir and uncalled for.

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          • #6
            What Clay is trying to say is that there are way too many Americans who have no clue about why Memorial Day is/should be a solemn day of remembrance of those who made the ultimate sacrifice, not just beer, brats, barbeque, and going to the lake. It is not Veteran's Day or Armed Forces Day either. I salute all those who have served in our Armed Forces, but this day is not about them.

            So why are there massive traffic jams on Friday before Memorial Day? Everyone getting on the road to visit National Cemeteries or attend memorial services? Hardly...

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            • #7
              I am afraid we live in an America who's urban contingent by and large feels that such old fashioned ideals are antiquated and should be disregarded. They are far more consumed by who is currently in Kim Kardashian's pants than by the reality of who has and is defending their right to live here and watch "reality" TV.

              Yes, I'm part of the half century club.

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              • #8
                I agree that there are many people under 50 who may not realize the incredible sacrifices made by so many to give us everything that we have today. I am under 50 with many friends and family serving or that have served in our nation's military. I have lost several highschool friends in Iraq. Guys that I grew up with, played baseball with.

                I grew up 10 miles from the turning point of the civil war. A small Pennsylvania town where 3 days of hell saved our country from destruction in 1863.

                My D-Day memorial was our family BBQ's and spending time with my great uncles who stormed the beaches or were paratroopers.

                No, I have not served personally, but that doesn't mean that I do not know what Memorial Day is all about and appreciate everything I have because of the men and women of our armed forces, even if I am at a BBQ having a beer and a brat with one of those soldiers.

                I know what your trying to say Clay and I agree that often many are more about having a day off work and partying than rememberance. But not sure if it was the best choice of words.

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                • #9
                  www.bing.com/videos/search?q=NRA+PATRIOT+GUARD+RIDERS&view=detail&mid= 6E18036341ED060D28446E18036341ED060D2844&first=0

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                  • #10
                    I can only add my own prospective. Being a baby boomer and growing up in Brooklyn I can add this. I lived in a large city that was a collection of microcosms of different races, religions and ethnic heritages. All remembered WWII and the Korean War. Some had parents that carried the scares of WWI. Everyone remembered food & gas rationing and not knowing what will become of their families at wars end. A lot where immigrants that were happy to get out the h+ll out of Dodge to the land of freedom and plenty. My point in every neighborhood their was a memorial some not larger than a tombstone with a brass plague. Every Memorial day morning an Honor Guard would march to these MANY memorials fire a salute and lay a wreath. People would come out of their 3 story walk ups. They would crowd the street remove their hat and cover their heart. Some of the people in that street didn't carry a Springfield rifle. But they did know maybe better than most what freedom is and it's price. Now I know that at this very minute there are soldiers at risk to maintain these freedoms. No one on this blog is minimizing their contribution. If I had to come up with a cause for today's society. I would say for America war has become too abstract. You see it on TV sandwiched between two really intense action comedies. Unless you you were their it's a boring second place. The last time I saw reality on Long Island was after 911. We had two or three Police and Fire Department funerals for months. This is not counting civilian funerals. Like WAM said every weekend was a traffic jam only these weren't headed to a picnic. This went on for almost a year. It became surreal and common place. This was probably a small taste of what those people from my youth went through.

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                    • #11
                      Good point Clay. However, due to global conflicts like the war in Iraq and Afghanistan, quite a lot of us in our 20s and 30s know all about what Memorial Day is about. All too well. In memoriam for my beloved brothers.

                      Matthew Holloway & Juan Rodriguez-Velasco KIA 1/13/05

                      Brent Morel KIA 4/7/04, al-Anbar Province, Iraq

                      Benny "Tex" Christensen KIA 4/17/45 Monte Nonascoso, Italy

                      And the countless American men and those women who have died serving our beloved nation, haven for our ancestors and our own fat and happy homeland.

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                      • #12
                        I don't think that's true. I'm in my late 20's and many of us have grandparents who served in WWII and Korea, and fathers and uncles who went off to Vietnam. I couldn't be more proud of the service of my grandfather(still living) in WWII and he's on my mind every Memorial Day- Tech. Sgt. US army AF, flight engineer/top turret gunner B-26 medium bomber. 65 combat missions flown, including 3 on D-Day, and throughout the battle of the bulge, awarded the air medal with 11 oak leaf clusters.
                        I don't think it's just returning Iraq and Afghanistan vets who may be slightly offended by your generalization. And thank you to all of you who happen to read this and have served, are currently serving, or plan to serve! We all owe you a debt of gratitude for the sacrifices you are willing to make.

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                        • #13
                          I'm 28 and one of my best friends was killed in Afghanistan a few years ago. I don't need Memorial Day to remind me of his sacrifice, and everyone else before and after him either. I'm thankful everyday...not just one day out of the year.

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                          • #14
                            Good grief. Read this, you have Veteran's Day confused!

                            Memorial Day is a federal holiday observed annually in the United States on the last Monday of May. Formerly known as Decoration Day, it originated after the American Civil War to commemorate the fallen Union soldiers of the Civil War. By the 20th century Memorial Day had been extended to honor all Americans who have died in all wars. Memorial Day is a day of remembering the men and women who died while serving in the United States Armed Forces.

                            Key concept here folks is "died while serving", not Uncle Billy Bob who served in Korea and made it home.

                            See! Clay is right. Clueless

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                            • #15
                              I agree Clay, I know what it's all about but most people in my generation have no clue the freedom is not at all free. Thank you men and women who have served and are serving for keeping our country free and protecting us!

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