Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Your dog is very old and very sick and you know it's time to have him put to sleep. Do you do it yourself or take the dog to th

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    It cost $50.00 to carry your pet to the vet. I personally could not do it because I consider my dog's my family. If you decide to go to the vet they will give you the option of staying in the room with your pet until they pass.

    Comment


    • #17
      Take your pal to the vet and they'll handle everything. You can even have all or some of the ashes if you choose creamation. BTW: it's ok to cry

      Comment


      • #18
        I had my first dog when I was 2, 14 wonderful years later I had to put her down. My father made me take her to the vets. They asked if I wanted to be with her and I said yes. They allowed me to pet her until she died. They wrapped her up in her Bart Simpson blanket that she loved. We took her home and I buried her.

        Comment


        • #19
          The thing I love about my dogs Jill (German Shorthaired pup) and Bunny (Toy Poodle) is many of their non-human qualities. The love you get from man's best friend is unconditional. They never have hidden agendas or borrow money that won't be repaid. And they are always there with a grand reception when you come home after a really sh!tty day at the office. Bunny is 9 years old and we had to see the Vet earlier today because of an Epileptic (spelling?) seizure. Having to put her down is coming, but hopefully not for a few more years. It will be like losing one of the kids. Have no idea how we will do or deal with it.

          Comment


          • #20
            I had to put mine down a few years back. I would suggest that you get a friend who is not close to the dog to do it for you. That way, you save the expense of the vet, the animal is humanely dispatched, and you don't have the last memory being pointing a gun at your dog.

            Comment


            • #21
              I just went through this about 2 or 3 months ago. My 13 year old Labrador has been having seizures about 6 months and she finally had one that she was not snapping out of. I considered it my duty to "put her down". My friend had been the owner of her mother and had told me about her laying in his living room for several hours with the same problem and the horror of trying to comfort her while she slowly died. Not my dog, I thought. As I unloaded her to do the deed I began to understand why he had not done it. I have never felt gutwrenching pain like that. I had to just tell myself it was best. It was instant and painless and after it was done, she wagged her tail. May sound silly, but I believe she thanked me. I will never have a dog that can even compare to my Chocolate Mousse.

              Comment


              • #22
                I've done this both ways - they both suck.

                But with dogs that have been your best friend for a decade, the injection route definitely sucks less. As hunters we all know that instant death from a bullet (even to the head) is not guaranteed.

                The ideal situation would really be if you could buy the injections and do it yourself. Then you get the best of both worlds. We had a vet that left us a syringe for a horse for this reason. Though, I bet he could have gotten in a lot of trouble if anyone found out.

                Comment


                • #23
                  yeah there's a vet in my town that will go to your house and do it at your house for the comfort of the dog and comfort of the people.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Our vet makes house calls, and she gave my old dog a combination of meds that permitted her to drift off to sleep. She relaxed completely and her breathing ceased about 30 seconds later. I should have asked what the ingredients were, though I know one of them was morphine sulfate. Our dog was on my lap and surrounded by family when she slipped away. It was the best I could do for her.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I wish I hadn't even read this blog, it's to much for me to consider.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I don't think I could actually do it myself. But I would ask my brother or dad. Because they both know him but still have that distant touch. He would be in great hands and they would take care of it right.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          It's worth it to me to pay the vet. I don't want my last memory of my friend to be pulling the trigger. I'd take a needle over a bullet for myself if I had to choose. No matter what you do, it won't be easy, but why risk a flinch in such an emotional situation?

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I have let one of my dogs pass at home, but I went to my vet for medicine first. I did not want my dog to suffer in anyway, after he passed he was burried under his favorite tree.

                            After that situation I made the choice to take my pets to the vet when it was time to put them down, but they are always brought back home to be burried in their favorite place.

                            Either way you go it is a difficult situation

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              From someone whose dogs and cats have always been a part of the family, the people who talk of the expense of a vet just fries my bacon. As stated, a dog gives the most unconditional love there is (if you let it). I've never believed in the "total outside dog". In winter they lay by the fireplace and summer they flop wherever. They watch TV on the couch with us, which usually turns to 'rasslin because they both don't fit well. They ask for so little, really.

                              All our animals have always been rescues, and a few have had emotional or physical problems to overcome. Picture a 7-month old puppy mill dog who didn't even know what grass was, with skinny, underdeveloped legs and muscles. Then watch him learn to play, bulk up, and generally learn that not all humans are pure evil. Takes about 4 months, and it's worth your soul to see that light bulb come on.

                              We're not fanatics about it, actually because we can't afford to be. We never have more animals than we can adequately care for, including decent food, shots, and regular vet visits. The four we have lost have all left in my arms, being scratched and loved in a quiet setting by their "pack".

                              So you cheapskates, look on the bright side. You won't be buying any more of cheapest dog food you can find anymore. For something that gave it's entire life to you, pay it back with a touch of kindness.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                You shoot yer own dog. Iused to be "Chief Dog wrestler for a vet. I got to hold 'em down when the not so good doctor would put the needle in. I've seen convultions ensue and I have seen the not- so- good doctor inject ether directly into a dogs chest cavity to make a dog die faster. I been there, and a .22 to the head is as merciful as anything. Shoot yer own dog.

                                Comment

                                Welcome!

                                Collapse

                                Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

                                If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

                                And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

                                Right Rail 1

                                Collapse

                                Top Active Users

                                Collapse

                                There are no top active users.

                                Right Rail 2

                                Collapse

                                Latest Topics

                                Collapse

                                Right Rail 3

                                Collapse

                                Footer Ad

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X