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are there any advantages on having a fixed power scope, rather than a variable magnification power? i can't really think of many

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  • Mark Lee
    replied
    theyre cheaper

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  • rudyglove27
    replied
    I prefer fixed power scope and it's much decent priced for me!

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  • IanS
    replied
    They both have their perks. Personally I have a Leupold 4x 33 on my Tikka T3 270. It is certainly not the trend to get a fixed power but the reason I got it was I was having very bad results in the past with a variable. It would not stay sighted in. Fixed power scopes have almost nothing that moves so there is less week spots and less to break. Another reason was that you can't forget to put your scope on the correct power for the situation. 4x will always be low enough to see at close distances but if you forget that your scope is on 9x and the buck of your dreams is 15 yards in front of you you'll regret it. That happened to me 2 years ago. My scope was frozen, I couldn't turn it down and it was stuck on 9X. I could not find the buck in my scope and he got away. If I had my 4x on at the time or if I had remembered to turn it down I'd have a fine rack on my wall right now. Most companies offer a lifetime warranty but when a scope fails when you have a huge buck in your sights a new scope in the mail 2 months later won't do much to ease your pain. This go around I wanted to take the extra precaution and get the proven durability of a fixed power scope. Realistically how many shots should be taken beyond what you can see with a 4x. I can comfortably shoot 250 yards with mine.

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  • Edward J. Palumbo
    replied
    I acknowledge that variables have made great strides over the years in terms of optical engineering, rugged construction, coatings, clarity and ability to hold zero through their range of magnification, though one would be well advised to invest in a premium quality scope if you want these features appreciated at their best.
    Despite these improvements and advances, I prefer fixed power scopes for centerfire rifles I trust. This implies I've had disappointments...and I have, though they were years ago. Several of my fixed power scopes were purchased 15-20-30+ years ago. They still perform reliably, no fogging, no loss of zero. I relegated the variables to my .22 rimfire rifles. I'm sure many other shooters have had nothing but positive experiences, and have excellent reason to recommend the versatile variables. I do not doubt them, but I rely on what has earned my trust.

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  • Ed J
    replied
    Fixed power scopes have fewer lenses in them, less pieces of glass to look through means a clearer view.

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  • steve182
    replied
    Fixxed power scopes are generally priced lower than variables. That can be an advantage. I have a fixed power on my slug gun and lever action because i won't need high magnification for shots i take with those guns. On my '06 i have a variable because i may take longer shots.

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  • Del in KS
    replied
    All of the above is true, but for hunting big game 10X is far too much power. If a deer comes by at close range your scope will be full of hair and it will be hard to pick a good aimimg point. If you use a low price scope fixed is the only way to go. Fewer moving parts means it is more likely to maintain it's zero. For big game 3X to 6X is all you need and even 6 is pushing it. Save your coins and get a Leupold VXII or something of equal or better quality especially if it's a variable. Don't forget the scope is no better than the rings and cheap rings can actually damage the finish on your scope.

    Leave a comment:


  • KMB33
    replied
    Parralax wont be as bad and they are much better in thick brush.

    Leave a comment:


  • lovetohunt
    replied
    Ya, and you don't have to worry about what power to take a shot with, cause you only got one power.

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  • CPT BRAD
    replied
    yes that plus if you have a Mil Dot it is figured for one range, usually 10x or the max power for ranging. So if you are on low power and try to range with it it won't work.

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  • are there any advantages on having a fixed power scope, rather than a variable magnification power? i can't really think of many

    are there any advantages on having a fixed power scope, rather than a variable magnification power? i can't really think of many advantages other than maybe it's a little bit more sturdy and wouldn't break as easily.

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