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I have an on-going practical joke war with one of my hunting buddies. I am now in the position of owing him one, any suggestion

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  • #16
    I don't think I could bring myself to pull a prank that would disrupt someone's hunt. Two fairly harmless pranks I have pulled include pouring flour into the air conditioning vents in a friend's car and encasing a friend's car keys in jello.

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    • #17
      If he leaves his truck unlocked, when he isn't looking pop open his fuse box and pull out the fuse marked "ECU" or ECM" This runs his engine computer.

      When he goes to start it, the engine will turn over, the spark plugs will fire, but the injectors won't spray fuel. No matter what, it won't start.

      Let him spend about half an hour pulling his hair out trying to find the problem. Then when he goes to call for a tow / mechanic hand him the fuse and say "I think you lost this buddy"

      When you pop the fuse back in, the truck will start right up and you get to laugh your arsk off for about a month.

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      • #18
        I forgot a good one I did just this year. My son told me a story about how a coon chased him on the trail while walking back from his stand one night. I happened to shoot a coon from my stand (perfect head shot 30 yds walking away, arrow of course) a few nights later. I got down out of my stand early and took the coon back to the truck. I tied a string around the coons neck and laid it in the high grass next to the trail and I hid in the grass on the other side.

        When he came walking by I pulled the coon with the string from one side of the trail to the next right in front of him. Well, it didn't work perfectly. He saw the string before he saw the coon and as the coon passed by in front of him he said "Dad, what are you doing?"

        We laughed about that for days.

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        • #19
          My father told me a story about some neighbors that happened when he was a boy in the 1920's growing up in the woods of Southern Georgia. There was an old timer that lived in a cabin with his son's at the end of a long 1 lane dirt road. They was so economically challenged they didn't even have a mule. Every month on a Saturday morning one of the boys would walk to Grandpa's farm with a list and a couple dollars for food staples like meal and flour. Then that evening the old man and the oldest son would trek to the farm with an old homemade wheel barrow to pick up the supplies. The son would put on a shoulder harness and pull the 'barrow while the old man helped by lifting the handles and guiding from behind. Well one Saturday they lingered 'til after dark talking to dad's family and the subject was ghost stories. Finally with a small oil lamp for light the old man and his son set out for home. Well dad's brother Grady was a bit of jokester. He pilfered a white sheet from his moms linen closet, slipped out the back door and ran down the trail to a dark place where trees overhung the two track. Before long he heard the squeaking of the wheelbarrow and the two men talking as they walked the trail toward home. Draping the sheet over his head Grady raised up behind some palmettos and let out a long low moan. In record time the old man and son was back at dad's house with an empty wheel barrow screaming about the ghost they saw. Uncle Grady ran home and stashed the sheet while slipping in the back door. Needless to say they stayed the night. Next morning a party issued forth to try and recover the lost supplies. Dad said there was white flour, sugar and corn meal scattered all over the place where they had ran with that old wheel barrow. Uncle Grady didn't dare 'fess up. His father would have whipped him with a plow line for costing that old man his supplies. My dad repeated that story many times before he passed away. If you ever do this make sure they aren't armed.

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          • #20
            Throw some Deer guts at him when he is not looking. Works every year!

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            • #21
              Clay, My dad said that something happened like that at the place where he deer hunts down in the southern tip of Illinois. but a prank, i saw this in an email from a friend that you can pull on new comers to camp but i'm sure that you can work up a story that you heard something about telling if deer were near by. What you do is you put milk duds i think by the trail where you'll be walking. Then when you walk out there, you point them out and say the only way to see if they're fresh is to chew them up, grab a handful and eat them, then ask him if he would like to try some.

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              • #22
                Dang Del, you told me about your uncle but he was more of a 'jokster' than I thought.

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                • #23
                  Tried this long ago and don't know how it would work with today's ignition systems... but long ago, I took about 10 feet of electrical wire and soldered it to a sharpened welding rod. When he went to his stand, I put one end of the wire in the distributor cap in place of a spark plug wire. I pushed the sharpened welding rod up through his pickup seat so it just barely came out. Upon his return, he jumped in and hit the starter... made a noticeable impressioin on him as he hit the top of the cab... not the most sophisticated trick but pretty good payback for a friend who is a real practical joker without disrupting the hunt.

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                  • #24
                    Put a coyote mount in his stand...a buddy did to me i nearly cried/soiled my pants.

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