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clay seems to say this alot, and i'm not sure what it means. MOP, MAO, MOA, some stuff like that. help me out?!

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  • clay seems to say this alot, and i'm not sure what it means. MOP, MAO, MOA, some stuff like that. help me out?!

    clay seems to say this alot, and i'm not sure what it means. MOP, MAO, MOA, some stuff like that. help me out?!

  • #2
    MOA is a legitimate ballistics term, it means Minute Of Angle. Essentially, 1 MOA = 1 inch at 100 yards, 2 inches at 200 yards, etc. This is the unit we use to measure the accuracy of our rifles.

    MOP is more of a made up term, but it actually makes really good sense. It means Minute Of Pieplate. If you can hit a pie plate (about the size of big game vitals) at a certain range, you are shooting MOP up to that range. For some people, MOP is only 100 yards, and for others it's more like 700. If you can shoot MOP at the longest range you plan on taking shots, you are good to go.

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    • #3
      Good Job Shane! We use MOAs to consider a rifles accuracy, it carries out over a distance. If you're rifle shoots .5 MOA at 100 then it will bust P Dogs out to 300, If it shoots 1 MOA then it will shoot Elk or Moose out to 3 or 400 yards also. Where MOA REALLY comes into play is to ranging. Here is how the military uses it. Mil Dot scopes. Common knowledge is that a man is 18 inches wide at the shoulders and about 6 foot tall. 1 dot equals 1 inch at a hundred yards so if a man's shoulders take up 3 dots the the range is 600 yards. Equally if an Elk's vitals from neck to chest equal 3 dots then it also equals 600 yards. It's a really good system and some people may point out my math is wrong but I tried!

      Thanks all.

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      • #4
        I wish they would make MOA dot reticles. The milliradians in mil-dot reticles are a little screwy to calculate in my head.

        Instead of worrying about mil-dots and holdovers, just zero at 25 yards. You should be about dead on at 300, and about 3 inches high at 100 - easy to compensate for. At 200 you can hold dead on or just a hair low. So if you have one show up quick at short range, you can hold dead on, you know what to do at 100 and 200, and at 300 where things get shaky, you can have the confidence of a dead on hold. Anything past that, you need to get closer, or you're just a sharpshooter and not much of a hunter.

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        • #5
          By'Golly, Excellent job Sir Shane!

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          • #6
            Yeah, sorry for taking that one from under ya. Yer the master.

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            • #7
              Great answer shane and + 1 for you!!!

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