Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

would you consider the confederate battle flag rascit? i wear one on a hat and my dad told me some big black guy is gonna try to

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • would you consider the confederate battle flag rascit? i wear one on a hat and my dad told me some big black guy is gonna try to

    would you consider the confederate battle flag rascit? i wear one on a hat and my dad told me some big black guy is gonna try to fight me over it when the civil war was mostly fought for southern independence and unfair taxation of southern farmers and not all about slavery which is what about all history books want people to belive

  • #2
    its your opinion and i respect that, but if your opinion makes you terrorize others. (which i know you dont do) thats where a opinion is racist. most of the things in school history books are wrong, for example Christopher Columbus settling in America. i personally wouldnt fly the flag, because i am from the north and it would make me look like a wannabe southerner, ( nothing is wrong with the south, i would like to live their someday) but if you believe in what the flag stands for i have no issue with it, as people these days are way too sensitive to things and i dont want to be one of them.

    Comment


    • #3
      I saw an excellent comedy show on this topic once, but the punchline isn't something I can post here.

      Suffice to say that, while valid arguments can be made about things such as love of union and love of states' rights were the proximate causes that drove people to fight in the war, the decades-long tension between North and South was driven, blatantly, by the question of slavery.

      I know plenty of people who wave the rebel flag for racist reasons. I'm glad to hear that you're displaying it out of pride and not hate. That said, the swastika is an ancient symbol of good luck, but if you wear it now, no one will think that's what you're all about. That's the world we live in.

      Perhaps you should find a different symbol of your heritage, ideally one that's a good conversation starter. You might consider the Bonnie Blue Flag, for example, for a symbol that references the history without the racial baggage.

      Comment


      • #4
        It would be wiser in this day and age to fly the Gadsden "Don't Tread on Me" it's popular now. Just a thought.

        Comment


        • #5
          i wouldn't judge you for it but others most certainly will.

          Comment


          • #6
            I don't see a problem with it.

            Comment


            • #7
              It is offensive to many people like the Nazi flag. If that bothers you don't wear it. It has flown at Klan rally's and state capitals and its history is very complex. It is not just about heritage to many people and the country it was a battle flag for was seeking to maintain the aristocracy of the slave holding plantations. Its a strange choice for many of the people who fly it because the confederate government was more like a dictatorship than a democracy. Their president was appointed not elected I believe. If you fly it you will offend many people.

              Comment


              • #8
                i dont veiw the flag as rascit and im not wearing it to offend blacks. my great great great great grandpa fought for the confederacy along with a few great great great great uncles. it dont offend some blacks where i live ive even seen a few wearing a rebel flag but their ansestors fought for the confederacy. i dont wear it because i hate america i love living in america im just not very fond of the goverment and not many people are now days. i wear it because some of my ansestors fought for the south not for slavery but for independence for the south and to most people around where i live country boys and girls wear

                Comment


                • #9
                  Im curious what you consider the rebel battle flag?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Growing up outside of the South, I always considered it to be a racist symbol. After spending a lot of time in Florida (that funny shaped state next to the South) I have come to realize that not everyone who sports it is doing so for racist reasons, but that doesn't change the fact that a lot of people will interpret it that way.

                    I think that particular flag has come to be associated with ignorance and racism. I am well aware that plenty of guys on this forum will tell me I am a dumb Yankee and that I have no idea about the meaning of that flag. They are right. I grew up about 5000 miles north of the Gulf Coast and do not have the cultural affiliation of Southerners. However, I can tell you that I am not the only one suffering from my particular cultural ignorance, and that a lot of people will consider it racist.

                    Why not pick another symbol of your heritage?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Born, raised and live in Alabama and I choose not to display the Confederate flag. It isn't that I'm not proud of my heritage---the Johnnie Rebs fought the good fight, but it was a long time ago. The war may not have been all about slavery, but that was a major component. I say to recognize the flag as a piece of history, but don't venerate it. Let's live in the world we have today an let's not do any unnecessary provocation, because the flag does have deep racist connotations.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I think I would follow your father's advice. It is not about what it stands for, but what others perceive that might get the stuffing kicked out of you by some ignorami.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I think country road said it best. It is a piece of history, and not something to be flaunted in this day and age.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            my dad told me when he was growing up you could wear a rebel flag and nobody would really care much. and my grandpa told me when he was growing up nobody cared either

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Symbols come and symbols go. The Klan's pointed hood goes back to the European middle ages religious ceremonies. The Swastika predates WWII by 2000 years in Hindu and American Indian culture. It was the symbol for the sun. You can wear what you please. It's the location where you wear it. My son had a profession in a neighborhood were wearing Red or Blue on the wrong street corner could get you shot or at least a very professional beating. Wear what you want but be aware of where your wearing it.

                              Comment

                              Welcome!

                              Collapse

                              Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

                              If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

                              And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

                              Right Rail 1

                              Collapse

                              Top Active Users

                              Collapse

                              There are no top active users.

                              Right Rail 2

                              Collapse

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Right Rail 3

                              Collapse

                              Footer Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X