Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Why is it necessary, in re-blueing a firearm, to polish the original finish away before applying the new finish? It seems that t

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 99explorer
    replied
    cooner-
    Are you saying that the surfaces that retain the original blueing would be affected by the reblueing action?
    Or that the worn surfaces would take the reblueing unevenly?

    Leave a comment:


  • Hunter Savage
    replied
    you dont have to if you are happy with blotches in your final bluing job .

    Leave a comment:


  • 99explorer
    replied
    This is a theoretical question, and not a practical problem.
    Polishing is said to be the most important step in the process. I have no reason to dispute that. I just don't understand why. It seems that after degreasing, the factory polish would suffice before submerging the item in the tank, and only the bare metal would be affected by the salts.

    Leave a comment:


  • DSMbirddog
    replied
    If you don't take it all off you won't get an even blue. If your just touching up you can get a product for that but it won't be a nice even blue black finish. These guys are right.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sourdough Dave
    replied
    Sort of like sanding out beyond the bondo on a repaired fender so the finished paint job looks smooth and you can't tell it was ever repaired. After polishing, degrease the surface before applying the bluing compound

    Leave a comment:


  • 99explorer
    replied
    You would have bare metal where the original finish had worn away.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sourdough Dave
    replied
    Bluing is a form of oxidation, sort of a controlled rust, so for the oxidation to take place you need to have bare metal.

    Leave a comment:


  • Why is it necessary, in re-blueing a firearm, to polish the original finish away before applying the new finish? It seems that t

    Why is it necessary, in re-blueing a firearm, to polish the original finish away before applying the new finish? It seems that the new blueing would cover all surface areas where the original finish had worn away.

Welcome!

Collapse

Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

Right Rail 1

Collapse

Top Active Users

Collapse

There are no top active users.

Right Rail 2

Collapse

Latest Topics

Collapse

Right Rail 3

Collapse

Footer Ad

Collapse
Working...
X