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tips for cooking coyotes?

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  • 230hardball
    replied
    i wouldnt eat them..parisites and worms...unless it was a red dawn situation...probably better off eating your boots or underware...

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  • Sourdough Dave
    replied
    If you catch a mouse or rat in a trap do you feel compelled to cook and eat it, or do you just dispose of it in the trash? I didn't think so. So, when you eradicate other vermin such as coyote why would you want to eat it. Yes, I too subscribe to the rules of "If you kill it, then eat it". However, this rule does not apply to the eradication of vermin and pests.

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  • hunter lettman
    replied
    DON'T eat a coyote. If you hunt them you know what they eat. My Dad and I trap and we use the carcases to bring them in. They eat coon carcases like candy and skunks are a delicasey. Skunks are also know for haveing the the clear-white joint worms. I wouldn't eat a coyote for money.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sourdough Dave
    replied
    Hmm? Eat coyote or become a vegetarian? Pass the tofu please.

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  • Clay Cooper
    replied
    WAM such a delicious delicacy!

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  • Ed J
    replied
    crm3006 you for got the 8 gal. keg.

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Procure one medium sized coyote. Do not attempt to cook old, tough dogs.
    Bone out hindquarters and back meat of coyote, and shoulders if desired.
    Marinate chunks of coyote meat in equal parts red wine, and balsamic vinegar overnight, add three cloves of garlic if desired.
    In a large cast iron skillet, pour in 1/2-3/4 cup of extra virgin olive oil. Heat oil to simmer over medium high heat. When oil is hot, add chunks of coyote meat and stir continuously until meat is browned.
    Smother browned coyote meat with equal parts tomato sauce and red wine. Add 1/2 lb. of sliced mushrooms, or two small cans of mushroom stems and pieces, one medium onion, (chopped) and two bell peppers, (chopped and seeded).
    Serve with baked sweet potatoes and fresh green beans.
    Serves six.

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  • deerhunterrick
    replied
    Fillet the coyote down the back like you would the backstraps on a small deer. Cut into medalions 1" thick. place in plastic wrap and pound with a tenderizer hammer until fairly 1/2" thick. mix flour salt,black pepper, garlic powder,celery salt.Coat well with mixture. Medium frying pan cover bottom of pan with Olive oil and basal and bring to a bubble and turn down to medium heat. Place steaks in pan and cook each side for approximately 3 minutes per side. Well done is the best bet. Eat on toast or by itself . Sweet and sour sauce or hot mustard are great on it too.

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  • EGFGboy
    replied
    Just skin it, cut the carcass into a few a pieces and then use that as bait for more. It's one big circle

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  • Hunter Savage
    replied
    yes boil one in a pot along side a old muddy boot in another pot ,when the boot is tender toss out the coyote and eat the boot.

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  • Clay Cooper
    replied
    Happy only you

    CRACK ME UP!

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  • Clay Cooper
    replied
    Coming in dead on, 338 Win Mag 225 grain Hornady Soft Point at 3000 fps!

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  • Carl Huber
    replied
    Showed this post to my wife. She reminded me her uncle Joe roast dog in Korea. He said it was pretty good but the situation was dyer

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  • Happy Myles
    replied
    I would cook it the same as hyena, braised with a sweet sour sauce

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  • Keith Costley
    replied
    What I would do is put a two-pound chunk of coyote meat on a flat board, put it in the oven, cook it at 350 degrees for two hours, take it out, throw the coyote meat away and eat the board!

    Leave a comment:

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