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this question would qualify as a survival question. on march 6 i am doing the polar plunge to help raise money for special olymp

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  • this question would qualify as a survival question. on march 6 i am doing the polar plunge to help raise money for special olymp

    this question would qualify as a survival question. on march 6 i am doing the polar plunge to help raise money for special olympics, what that is, is a bunch of people jumping into a freezing cold river, this year its going to be colder than normal the water temp will be in the low to mid 30s. my question is would it be best to get my core body temp down before i jump in, i figured it would be less of a shock to my body if my core temp is already low. any advice would be very welcome. and no not jumping is not a option.

  • #2
    take an ICE COLD shower first.

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    • #3
      here is a link that better tells what im doing.

      www.firstgiving.com/mount-carmel-youth

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      • #4
        as soon as you get out do a series of jumping jacks and push ups, this should get blood back into your limbs. As for pre warm up i would say just go for it, if you are colder longer your body will continue to loose blood flow. just jump in a keep calm once you are in the water!!!! good luck

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        • #5
          Reducing your core temp is one of the most dangerous things to do before jumping in. When your core gets lowered and it's only just a couple of degrees, you will be in serous trouble!

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          • #6
            You're out of your rabbit ass mind!

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            • #7
              thanks crm that makes me feel all warm and fuzzy inside lol. im only doing it to raise money for special olympics.
              ok so lowering my core body temp is dangerous, what are some other ideas. so i dont freeze to death and die?

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              • #8
                When you jump in, keep your head above the water if possible. When you jump into shockingly cold water your first instinct is to gasp for air. Keep it air not water. Also most of your heat is lost through your neck and head, you will be less miserable keeping your head out of the water. Man I did so many stupid things as a scout, but I can give helpful hints to stupid activities.

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                • #9
                  Drink 1/2 of a quart of whiskey to work up your courage. Have large bonfire burning on the bank, with at least three Pendleton wool blankets. Jump in. Jump out. Drink other 1/2 quart of whiskey, wrap in blankets, get as close to fire as possible. You are the one who asked for advice! LMSAO!!

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                  • #10
                    Be as warm as you can before you go in the water and do not drink any alcohol before you go in or after you come out. Alcohol dilates blood vessels and you will lose heat quicker and if you drink when you are cold the dilated blood vessels will return cold blood to your core quicker and drop the temperature. This can be very dangerous. When you hit the water watch out for an involuntary gulp of air. I put my chin against my chest and cover my nose, this seems to help.
                    Do not stay in the water any longer than you have to and when you get out dry off and get into dry clothes. Wrap up in a sleeping bag or blankets with another person (no funny business!) and drink warm liquids. There is a temptation to get into a hot shower or bath but you have to be careful. If you are very hypothermic and your core temp has already dropped the blood in your limbs will be even colder. When you get into a hot shower or tub the cold blood will move into your core and make the situation worse. I like to think of it as “you loose heat quickly from your limbs but slowly from your core and you re-warm you core quickly but your limbs slowly”. Try to be one of the first ones out of the water so you watch the others. Sometimes it is the 250 lb “he men’’ that squeal like little girls when they hit the water. Have fun, be careful and post pictures.

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                    • #11
                      "For God's sake, Jim, I'm a doctor, not a pool man!" So I may not be qualified to answer but...........

                      I would guess that having a lower core temperature when going in would be more dangerous.

                      But remember I am just a college kid. I would ask people who have done it before for tips.

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                      • #12
                        spartan88, Yes my name is Jim, no I am not a doctor or a pool man. In 38 years of working on the water in Alaska I have been in near freezing water many times, most intentional some unintentional. The above techniques work. Yes my answer was overkill for the question. I always welcome a critique. Check out the following http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hypothermia/DS00333/DSECTION=treatments-and-drugs

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                        • #13
                          jwallen I was just quoting ace ventura. I believe your answer was not overkill at all. The original poster needs as much info from experts (which in this case you are) as he/she can get.

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                          • #14
                            I also apologize if it seemed like I was making fun of you or discrediting you. That post was not directed towards anyone. So I am sorry if I offended you.

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                            • #15
                              spartan88

                              Doc, do I have smoking hot deal for you!

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