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Do you think a muzzleloader is better for a beginning hunter then a shotgun for a youth to teach them ever shot counts.

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  • Do you think a muzzleloader is better for a beginning hunter then a shotgun for a youth to teach them ever shot counts.

    Do you think a muzzleloader is better for a beginning hunter then a shotgun for a youth to teach them ever shot counts.

  • #2
    The single shot strategy is a good one. Recoil can be managed easily by how and what you load. They can be had in youth configurations with out breaking the bank. If you cast your own bullets and use loose powder they are cheap to shoot which makes for good practice. Thay can also be easily mounted with a scope these days.

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    • #3
      I would say that or making them use a single shot centerfire rifle or shotgun would work well.

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      • #4
        I am a fan of pumps to start. You can start them with one shell at a time. It's something they can grow with by changing stocks. A bit more mass to soften the recoil, too.

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        • #5
          Good grief, two seasons ago I started my Grandson at age 7 with a Remington 700 CDL 25-06 cradled in a Ramline Youth Stock topped with a 3x9 Sightron. Last season age 8, he shot his buck at 250 yards and moments later his doe at 150 both with one terrific heart and lung shot.
          If it’s rifle season, let them shoot rifle and If they can’t hit with a rifle a shotgun may do. If it’s muzzle loader season, shoot muzzle loader and if its archery and they can pull back 40 pound or a crossbow and be able to “MOP” LET”R RIP CHIP!
          In June’ish of 1985 we started training a young teenage girl named Sandra Wormen. We didn’t start her out with no Ruger 10-22, we started her out with an Anschutz and in June of 86 she was at the Whittington Center in Raton New Mexico trying out for the Olympics!

          If going to train them, then do it right and give them quality equipment to use!

          What really pisses me off the most is the Firearm Manufacturers will not make an affordable and quality firearm for youths. Last deer season before opening day, a Father and his son was in the Gun dept at Wal-Mart. The Young Lad eyes was as big as Christmas morning then came a low sad hopeless voice saying, sorry son, I can’t afford it and he turned and shuffled off with his son. That young man will remember that day as long as he lives!

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          • #6
            I'm a firm believer that if you make it too complicated, they will become overwhelmed and not take it seriously and become negative about it. I've taught rifle shooting, shotgun shooting, and muzzleloading to the Boy Scouts, and what I found is that the muzzleloading takes a backburner to the others because of simplicity. Load a shell and shoot. Instant gratification. Versus clearing the barrel, loading the powder charge, dumping the powder, getting a ball in the patch, ramming it home, then either priming the pan or putting the cap on. It takes a beginner 3 to 5 minutes to get 1 shot off, versus 2 to 5 seconds to get off a shot with a 22 single shot bolt action. I would say go with the single shot, many companies are making combo units, rifle, shotgun and muzzleloader barrels and one frame, which can make hunting more fun.

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            • #7
              After my adventures with my Daisy bb gun, I started off on my big game adventures hunting rabbits with a Stevens single shot shotgun, 20ga. I learned quick I had one shot at them bunnies!

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              • #8
                Good answers above. I think it comes down to the kid too. Find something that the kid can handle and keep it simple. Some kids, depending on age and maturity, can probably handle the situation better than others. I leave it up to the parents to find the right gun for the situation.

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                • #9
                  No, if you do that just put one slug in a shotgun.

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                  • #10
                    toatlly agree. but, i prefer muzzloaders to shotguns. i like the smell, and challenge of a tradional muzzloader

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                    • #11
                      agree wtih peter

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                      • #12
                        Agreed with Beekeeper answer above and A + 1 for you!!!

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