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  • EVAKATY75
    replied
    yuck, yet somebody eats them I've had some doves that were nasty AND chewy. Showbox jiofi.local.html tplinklogin
    Last edited by EVAKATY75; 01-22-2021, 04:27 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post

    I cut my "hunting teeth" shooting "tree rats". I've eaten a ton (more or less! LOL!) of them.
    Fried, stewed, with dumplings and even grilled.
    I don't hunt them anymore. I've just lost my taste for them. In a "hunger" situation, I would not hesitate to resume eating squirrel.

    Bhr, cut them up as you wish.
    Dredge in flour and fry until lightly browned.
    Remove the squirrel and set aside.
    Make gravy with the drippings.

    I use those little disposable "loaf pans" you find at WalMart and other discount stores but any small, covered, oven safe dish will work.

    Dice up some onion, a potato and a clove of garlic and place in the bottom of the pan.
    Place the browned squirrel on top of the veggies and cover with the gravy. If you don't have enough gravy, add milk until the squirrel is submerged.
    ...and of course, salt and pepper to taste.

    Cover tightly with foil (or lid), place in the oven at 250°F for one hour.
    The squirrel will be chicken tender. Spread the gravy, potato and onion over hot buttered biscuits!
    Yummm......!!!
    Sounds delicious, call me when supper’s ready !

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    Originally posted by bowhunter75richard View Post
    When still in school, used to do a lot of bunny hunting, but I’ll be darned if I can remember how my mom fixed them. Squirrels are very good eating. I quarter them, boil for about 30 minutes, then dip in flour and brown them in frying pan. Only thing I hate is the skinning. Skinned when they are still warm is much easier than later, but still a job, but then maybe I am not doing it correctly ! Give them a try, delicious !!
    I cut my "hunting teeth" shooting "tree rats". I've eaten a ton (more or less! LOL!) of them.
    Fried, stewed, with dumplings and even grilled.
    I don't hunt them anymore. I've just lost my taste for them. In a "hunger" situation, I would not hesitate to resume eating squirrel.

    Bhr, cut them up as you wish.
    Dredge in flour and fry until lightly browned.
    Remove the squirrel and set aside.
    Make gravy with the drippings.

    I use those little disposable "loaf pans" you find at WalMart and other discount stores but any small, covered, oven safe dish will work.

    Dice up some onion, a potato and a clove of garlic and place in the bottom of the pan.
    Place the browned squirrel on top of the veggies and cover with the gravy. If you don't have enough gravy, add milk until the squirrel is submerged.
    ...and of course, salt and pepper to taste.

    Cover tightly with foil (or lid), place in the oven at 250°F for one hour.
    The squirrel will be chicken tender. Spread the gravy, potato and onion over hot buttered biscuits!
    Yummm......!!!
    Last edited by FirstBubba; 09-23-2020, 11:52 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    When still in school, used to do a lot of bunny hunting, but I’ll be darned if I can remember how my mom fixed them. Squirrels are very good eating. I quarter them, boil for about 30 minutes, then dip in flour and brown them in frying pan. Only thing I hate is the skinning. Skinned when they are still warm is much easier than later, but still a job, but then maybe I am not doing it correctly ! Give them a try, delicious !!

    Leave a comment:


  • Danbo
    replied
    I use a 20 gauge .

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Originally posted by Danbo View Post

    I'm planning on it. My family lives up near Saint Regis falls area .
    I had cousins in Malone, got there going through Camp Drum.
    I hunt with a guy who hunts rabbits with a 10/22.
    The Moose tracking articles show a concentration of them in the north east part of the park.

    Leave a comment:


  • Danbo
    replied
    Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post

    Take your snowshoes.
    I'm planning on it. My family lives up near Saint Regis falls area .

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Originally posted by Danbo View Post
    To much time in my tree stand last year. I intend to chase Grouse, pheasants and rabbits in October.

    I also have an open invitation to chase hares in the northern Adirondacks. I hope I can make it happen this year after deer season.
    Take your snowshoes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Danbo
    replied
    Moving spam

    Leave a comment:


  • Danbo
    replied
    What are you using for small game?

    Leave a comment:


  • Danbo
    replied
    I'm going to use a 20 gauge 500 for hare.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    I grew up eating rabbits and squirrels. They were the mainstay of my hunting life along with pheasants and quail during the first 20 years of my life. The squirrels seemed to develop my stalking and shooting precision while the rabbits taught me to get on target FAST and make one good shot with my shotgun. Rabbits in the woods were always more challenging to hit than pheasants or quail because they seem to accelerate fast and be out of site in a second or two.I enjoy the meat from both and our crock pot was full of them almost every day growing up.

    Leave a comment:


  • Moose1980
    replied
    I have an alfredo recipe I use for rabbit/hares. Cut as much meat off as I can, pound thin, coat with italian panko bread crumbs, fry in olive oil. Make an alfredo sauce with heavy cream, butter, garlic and equal parts parmesan and romano cheeses. Serve with some linguine. Nice fall dish!

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Originally posted by Danbo View Post

    https://www.mdwfp.com/wildlife-hunti...aremia-rabbit-
    fever/



    Is this the disease your talking about?
    Tularemia - spots on the liver.

    Leave a comment:


  • dewman
    replied
    Originally posted by Danbo View Post
    To much time in my tree stand last year. I intend to chase Grouse, pheasants and rabbits in October.

    I also have an open invitation to chase hares in the northern Adirondacks. I hope I can make it happen this year after deer season.
    I have taken snowshoes in both Michigan and Colorado. I didn't care for them at all.

    Leave a comment:

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