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  • Bubonic Plague

    A squirrel south west of Denver tested positive for Bubonic Plague. Look out for fleas on small game, ground hogs, mice and rats, etc. Spray for fleas.
    Last edited by jhjimbo; 07-14-2020, 03:26 PM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
    A squirrel east of Denver tested positive for Bubonic Plague. Look out for fleas on small game, ground hogs, mice and rats, etc. Spray for fleas.
    Bubonic plague lingers on in many places. Human cases in the far north, especially Siberia and Mongolia, are perhaps most common these days (though still quite rare). Pneumonic plague is the scary one. Much more deadly and transmission is airborne directly from infected animal (hence the name). Be very careful about handling dead rodents and predators of them (cats, coyotes, weasels, etc.). Always advisable to let the carcass get cold before skinning, etc. Freezing it first is safest. Fortunately pneumonic variety is much rarer than bubonic but MUCH more dangerous. If you find a nice specimen dead in the field for no apparent reason, definitely leave it lay! Might get both you and taxidermist killed.
    Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 07-14-2020, 01:12 PM.

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    • #3
      I never thought of the plague as one of the hazards of taxidermy.

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      • #4
        There are three forms of the Plague and all are caused by the same bacteria, Yersinia Pestis. It is treatable with antibiotics if given early on. Don't handle any rodent and be careful with rodent predator's. Spray with flea spray or let freeze in the winter time. The fleas jump off a dead cold body, as do ticks. A friend taxidermist would not bring an animal in until it was frozen.

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        • #5
          A correction. Pneumonic plague can be contracted via airborne droplets but more commonly through other vectors or as a complication from bubonic or septicemic plague infection. Pneumonic reflects where the disease attacks ... in the lungs (bubonic = lymph system and septicemic = blood). Interesting that cats are bad for carrying the pneumonic variation. Another interesting fact is the incubation period is about a week after infection before symptoms show up. It is very deadly almost always causing death. Vaccines have been developed but too expensive for general use in third world countries where the disease is prevalent. I seem to recall in the Army back in the seventies being vaccinated for plague before shipping to Korea. Do you remember that Jimbo?
          Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 07-15-2020, 09:25 AM.

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          • #6
            I had an interesting lecture from a South Dakota DNR expert on the Bubonic plague. According to him, the same plague that infected San Francisco in 1900 has re-emerged every 17 years since then. It has been working its way east and penetrating the U.S. further with each recurrence. The 2009 outbreak was widely spread east of the Rockies and crossed the Wyoming / South Dakota border for the first time in history. It nearly wiped out the prairie dogs in 2009 before going dormant once more. It loved the fleas that prey on prairie dogs and that is how it transfers from host to host.

            Don't touch any rodents. Don't go near prairie dog mounds because that is where the fleas hang out waiting for their next ride. Don't touch prairie dogs or any other rodent between there and San Francisco. P-dogs came back strong within a couple of years and ranchers are once more aggressively poisoning them. About a year ago, I saw a Wikipedia article on p-dogs saying that there were only fewer than a million left in the world. Whoever wrote that has never been to South Dakota, Wyoming or Colorado. The colony I shot at for two days last year must have had 2 million in that one colony, even though ranchers were busy poisoning them for the two days I shot.

            The good news is that this mutation of the plague has only killed a few humans and has infected very few larger animals like dogs and cats over the last 100 years.

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            • #7
              Coulda swore I just posted about this not long ago.

              Do your part! Red Mist Prairie Dogs!!

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              • #8
                mice and rats, etc. Spray for fleas. Showbox jiofi.local.html tplinklogin
                Last edited by EVAKATY75; 10-02-2020, 01:26 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by EVAKATY75 View Post
                  mice and rats, etc. Spray for fleas.
                  Obviously another spin on the KATY crap that shows up occasionally. Another, the first, was more insistent on plagiarizing other posts, made figure out how to block.

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