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Whenever I go out to the woods squirrel hunting with some friends, it seems like the squirrels aren't there even though I had se

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  • rudyglove27
    replied
    The best time to hunt squirrels is the first hour of daylight and the two hours before sunset. Hunt them during late summer and early fall for best results. They seem to like weather in the 60s - 80s. Hunt them before and directly after a rain. They will be moving in search of food, and if it is wet you will be quieter in the woods!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • FloridaHunter1226
    replied
    Get a squirrel call and start calling and they will come out of their little hiding place and you'll get a shot on one.

    Leave a comment:


  • theyounggun
    replied
    Hate it when that happens. It's cause they saw you. Just sit in some brush with some bait/or not and they will come out in a little bit. If they don't come in 10 minutes move in deeper brush. They know your there because your in the open.

    Leave a comment:


  • trailertrash
    replied
    Walk real slow looking for any little movement or sound and hunting with a partner helps too because a lot of times they'll just move to the other side of the tree or branch. Just be careful and hunt safe and know exactly where you partner is. Hunting in the mornings and evenings is best especially if you just sit still and be quiet. Think about when you're deer hunting and all the squirrels you see. It aint much different. You see them because you're sitting still and quiet.

    Leave a comment:


  • kjflorian
    replied
    All good points above. I prefer mornings and that last hour before dark, we have plenty here where I hunt. I use a .22 w/ a scope, stalk slow. When I here one barking I head in that direction (slowly), watching the trees to spot him. Works very well and you can get more activity doing this, rather than sitting in one spot.

    They also make squirrel calls, you might be interested in picking one up.

    By the way, they make good fajitas.

    Leave a comment:


  • Elmer Fudd
    replied
    An old Justin Wilson joke:

    apply cajun accent:

    The old Cajun was out squirrel hunting and is getting skunked. Then he comes across a young boy with a bunch hung on his belt. So he asks him how he gets so many, and the kid shows him a bag of ball bearings, sees a squirrel, and throws one and kills the squirrel with a direct hit on the head. The Cajun says, "howee, how you like that and you being left-handed too." And the little boy says, no, he's right handed but "my daddy won't let me throw right-handed I tears em up too bad!"

    Leave a comment:


  • Elmer Fudd
    replied
    In spite of the impression we get from tame squirrels in parks, in the wild - believe it or not - they have no intention of winding up in your game bag. A lot more things are after them in the woods and they can be challenging. Even wild squirrels can drive you nuts when on a deer stand, eerily able to figure out they aren't going to be shot at I guess, giving you the idea that getting your limit will be easy once you got to hunt them instead of deer. But once you decide to bag a few they can really humble ya. Here is some wrong ways to go about it:

    *walk down a road or field where you are easily visible. You see them, they see you, and that's it.

    *make a movement after making a noise. When they hear a noise they look to see what made it. If you are perfectly still they may not see you, they can't pick out the form of a human like a turkey can; and if they don't connect a sound to some movement, usually they don't get too alarmed.

    *go hunting without understanding their behavior. You don't want to get into a contest about who can be the most wary. Imagine if you were in a contest where you could hide yourself easily, and the other guy had to walk around your hiding place all the time but couldnt get in it. Who is going to win that contest? If you seem to be in that contest, sit down and be quite for a while; wait to hear some stirring around before hunting again.

    Above all, what you really want is for these squirrels to be ranging around searching for food. The old timers will say the "squirrels are stirring." Sure enough you hear them in the leaves; they are very vulnerable once on the ground and you will kill a lot of them there, not just up in the trees. In the trees they are very clever; observe them even in a park, how they can get around the other side of the trunk and keep out of sight if you get too close.

    Sitting under a tree is good for a beginner, because it shows him the great value of just staying still as possible. But you should wear some hunter orange with this tactic to make it safe. Other hunters may see your head moving around on the trunk of that tree. Not good.

    One last thought: sometimes you only will get one or two squirrels, or, yep, maybe get skunked. Other days maybe not too hard to get your limit. So don't go if you have to be able to brag about how you get your limit all the time. And you will have to have a good attitude about cleaning those squirrels, too, a lot of guys give it up 'cause of that.

    I'll shut up now. I think a lot about this as it is a lot of fun and I go whenever possible.

    Leave a comment:


  • Edward J. Palumbo
    replied
    I really don't treat squirrel hunting as a "team" activity. I usually go alone for a morning's quiet time or with a friend who knows how to sit quietly. I rely on a Ruger 10/22 with a Weaver K3 scope; my old friend leans toward a 20 gauge shotgun. We find a comfortable position from which we can see each other, and we relax. We talk about it later, on the way back to our vehicle, but neither of us have much to say while sitting there. I've been know to nap or read a book, looking up if I hear a noise or detect a movement. We're usually on the way home by noon, and we rarely go empty-handed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Beekeeper
    replied
    Find an area with abundant food. Right now the squirels are feeding on maple and poplar buds in south. Try hunting early and late. Be quite getting into the woods and setting up. Sit tight like stand hunting for deer and let the squirrels start feeding. In some areas I even use my climbing stand. Let the squirrels get really active before you shoot. Typically at the shot the others will freeze or run to a tree and give you several more shots before hiding. This wait and shoot tactic works well for me any time of the year. I like to use a .22 rifle with good scope and standard velocity ammo. The rifle report is not nearly as loud with standard velocity ammo and I feel this helps keep the disturbance level down. I find I can usually kill 5-6 per stand site, sometimes more. Don't pick up you dead squirels until you have no more shot opportunities. But do finish or retrieve any wounded squirrels.

    Leave a comment:


  • bomberpride
    replied
    Its not really a tactic but my grandpa always to me find a good spot under a nest and sit still. But I've had the exact same problem as u have

    Leave a comment:


  • CPT BRAD
    replied
    I hate to say it but its a lot like deer hunting, hunt slow, try not to make a lot of noise, glass out in front of you and generrally mornings and afternoons are best. There did I give the little rat too much credit for acting like a big game animal or what?? LOL

    Leave a comment:


  • Steven9253
    replied
    one more thing you are going to spend alot of time looking up so even when you are not hunting look and watch the trees, alot of times you will only see an ear or maybe part of a tail. being able to pick out these subtle differences will help you alot and improve your hunting of other game as well

    Leave a comment:


  • Steven9253
    replied
    all of these were really good answers, also if you are hunting with another person walk with them and then have them stop at a location and you keep walking to where you will hunt and this will help in them following your movement

    Leave a comment:


  • Del in KS
    replied
    When you move do it very slowly. Use your eyes more than anything else. Try to hunt on days that are not too windy. Squirrels move less on windy days and are also harder to see then because the trees are also moving.

    Leave a comment:


  • beagleboy
    replied
    Are you hunting at the same time you see them? If not, then that may be your problem. Otherwisetry hunting mornings around an hour after sun-up to 10am. After 10am Squirrel activity slows until aboout an hour before dark.

    Leave a comment:

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