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I hunt coyotes mainly during the winter months when there is a decent amount of snow cover. Does anyone have any recommendations

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  • I hunt coyotes mainly during the winter months when there is a decent amount of snow cover. Does anyone have any recommendations

    I hunt coyotes mainly during the winter months when there is a decent amount of snow cover. Does anyone have any recommendations to help make the walking a little easier? Do you use snowshoes or might they be a hassle to conceal? Thanks.

  • #2
    Hunt Florida NO Snowshoes Needed, Just Camo Tank top,Camo Shorts and Snake boots or Sandals. Est:35,000+ Coyotes in Fl. Lol

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    • #3
      I'm not so sure about stealth/quietness. Typically I just try to get set up and stay still for awhile to let nature go back to its ways. For cover, I go to Sherwin Williams and buy an XXXL spray suit that you wear when you spray paint. Its white and covers you from head to tow. Works really well as camouflage. Then I just lay in the snow

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      • #4
        You won't sneak up on too many coyotes so I wouldn't worry about walking through the snow. Snow shoes are a hassle unless you need to walk over really deep fluffy snow. You will be better off going from set to set as tleichty said above. I also used to use the painter's suit sprayed with dark slashes to look like branches. It wears out pretty fast though. They have pretty nice snow camo suits for reasonable prices at most of the big sporting stores.

        Call them in the winter months. If your state allows it, go out in the middle of the night with fresh snow and a full moon. You can see well without artificial light and they come to the call with reckless abandon.

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        • #5
          Snowshoes could be an asset depending on the depth and texture of the snow. I used them years ago and they helped me hike in and out of my camp, but you ought to practice with them before the hunt because you've got to change your gait. Otherwise, you may scoop snow as you hike and you'll have to lift a mound of snow with each step. I haven't used them in decades, but they made better sense than sinking into the snow past my knees with each step, and the noise factor won't make a difference. In changing terrain (rocks, obstacles), they were not convenient to put on and take off, but they were useful for those situations when I had to move some distance over snow-covered pastures.

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          • #6
            Snowmobile? Sorry. I just couldn’t resist.

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