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Has anyone trained their dog to hunt with th? If so, hard much prep does it take?

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  • LostLure
    replied
    Two years back I took my 1 1/2 year old Lab pheasant hunting with me. It was my (and his) first time ever pheasnt hunting. Neither of us had any training in pheasnats. I took him along more as a companion than anything else. As soon as we got out there his natural instincts took over and I was really impressed. He improved every time we went out. The following year I decided to try duck hunting with him. Same thing, he knew exactly what to do. I just couldn't get him to sit still in the blind. We got him as an additional family dog and only paid $300 for him.

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  • bayouwoof
    replied
    Good to hear from The Family.

    Reckon Ah nose about small free geniuses and fire-breathing alpha+ dawgz and many of the rest.

    Mah roots are in the ones with strong pedigrees.

    They can do uncanny things in the field, as ye well nose.

    Gotta have at least one whose Daddy wuz NFC and Mammy a FC, mebbe a yellow and a black out of the same litter.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    My best was a female black lab. She was the runt of the litter and the kennel owner was going to drown her. He gave her to me for free. She was trained to hunt ducks, geese (from the blind and stalking), pheasants, quail and doves. She was not outdone by ANY dog hunting alongside her and I would not have traded her for any on the planet. I got more comments from other hunters on her than you could imagine. They thought she spoke English and didn't know a dog could do so much.

    I've seen plenty of outstanding dogs acquired in the $400 range and have seen no correlation between price and hunting ability. The training is a big differentiator and I am sorry to say that I have seen numerous duds that sold for over $2000.

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  • Pray- hunt-work
    replied
    Woof wylde- Its not often ive heard a better brief explaination of dog training before. However 3,500 isn't a starting point. I would say 2,000 is a starting point for a good hunting lab. My little yellow English female was 1200, and that was 50% off.

    Leave a comment:


  • Barnaby Wylde
    replied
    Not me, my friend. He trained them for the AKC Hunt Tests as well as hunting in target-rich environments..For that, he trained them on Mallards,pheasants,and chukars.He trains with a guy who has pointers and setters, one of whom is a former National number Three and six-time field champion.So they learned how to hunt quail as well,just by watching.Took them to a hunt test and one of them automatically (briefly) pointed his ducks, but nobody noticed.They were so engrossed in how they were going to use their ESP to cheat that they had no idea what a real hunter was like.The boys will also tree squirrels and catch rabbits.A great Labrador can be trained to do anything.This is no place to play.Go brush up on your psychology courses regarding learning.He's Gotta Master's Degree in Education as well.So he's studied quite a bit of psychology.Be prepared for Inherited Memory.These guys have been "trained" for twenty or thirty generations or so,so the biggest challenge is to not mess up something they already know.If you get a very smart one, he may give up on you and quit.You have got to be a professional-quality observer.The best thing to do is put them through the basics up close and then extend the range.A great oe can read your mind,the other dogs'minds, and anybody else's at a long range.A great one may appear to be disobedient,but usually he wants you to cut to the chase and thinks you're stupid.But it's like the man said,"If your dog cost more than your truck, you might be a redneck."


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  • Schultzii4
    replied
    What have you trained them to hunt?

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  • Barnaby Wylde
    replied
    www.theretrievernews.com/Classifieds

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  • Barnaby Wylde
    replied
    I have a friend who has Labradors.

    He has trained some and others trained him.

    You never know what you're going to get.

    But more money means better dog (usually).

    For a great dog, 10 minutes a day for three months.

    Great dogs start at about $3,500.

    www.theretrievernews.com/Classifiedshs.




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  • country road
    replied
    They're easier to train if you use the highest quality th you can find.

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  • DakotaMan
    replied
    I've done it. I probably spend around an hour a day with the dog for about three months training it. Then training continues for about three hours a week for many years thereafter. If you can do that, you will have a first class hunting dog.

    Leave a comment:


  • Has anyone trained their dog to hunt with th? If so, hard much prep does it take?

    Has anyone trained their dog to hunt with th? If so, hard much prep does it take?

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