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Another ethics type question: To keep a young hunter interested in hunting would you give him/her the credit for a kill that you

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  • Another ethics type question: To keep a young hunter interested in hunting would you give him/her the credit for a kill that you

    Another ethics type question: To keep a young hunter interested in hunting would you give him/her the credit for a kill that you made without them knowing?

  • #2
    I think age would be a large Factor to a point! and yes I would give Credit for a kill to He/She to keep them in the Hunting or Shooting Sports.

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    • #3
      Nope. I would want the young hunter to appreciate that hunting is about more than just killing stuff. I took my daughter out with me goose hunting one lovely morning last fall. She had a wonderful time even though she didn't have a license and couldn't carry a gun. Jessie is looking forward to going out again this fall ... if she can find a sitter for Parker who'll show up at five in the morning!

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      • #4
        That sounds like affirmative action in hunting, and not something to be encouraged. JMO.

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        • #5
          Yes. To a point.
          When I "started" hunting, my "job" was to kill crippled squirrels.
          I carried my own unloaded .410. My dad kept the ammo. When a squirrel hung tenaciously to a limb, I "dispatched" the critter ans got credit for the kill. Which was actually true.
          When we sat quietly and waited, I got to load "my" gun and shoot at dad's discretion.

          Soooo, yeah. To a point.

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          • #6
            I'd provide the young hunter with an easy target, or give them the kill shot on a wounded animal, and I think that's a good idea. I wouldn't give them credit for a kill they didn't make because I's suspect (at some level) they'd know what their sight picture or situation may have been and it would fall short of it's intended incentive.
            In a similar vein, my son is 22 now, and a good pistol shot, but I've never "thrown" a score to let him win. He'll certainly do that eventually and may be able to do it now, but he'll have to concentrate and work for the accomplishment...and he has! When he does, he'll be justifiably pleased (and I'll never hear the end of it!).

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            • #7
              Honesty is always the best policy, even if it is not always evident in our current society.

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              • #8
                I think it depends on the age of the young hunter. When I was knee high to a grasshopper, my dad would let me tag along on dove hunts with my BB gun. I would shoot beside him when a bird came in, and (I realize in retrospect) when we shot at the same time, he would give me credit for the bird. I loved it. As I got older, he taught me the deeper lessons that come from hunting, but kids love results and in my mind, it was like taking a kid to a farm pond full of tiny sunfish that will eat anything.

                When my nephew was young, I took him and his Red Ryder ptarmigan hunting with me. He shot several that I just "finished off" with the shotgun. He had a blast. I think if I had invited him to tromp around in the snow and watch me shoot birds, he would not have the passion for hunting he has now.

                I think the trick is just to taper off the Santa Claus story at the right time.

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                • #9
                  As a rule of thumb, I think it is okay to keep the youngster's interest up until the point that the kid is old enough to be physically capable of taking game on his own.

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                  • #10
                    I would not. I agree with OH that there is more to hunting than the kill. I try to keep them interested by pointing out and talking about all the other things that happen on a hunt and the many other animals that you see. Play games with them that they may learn about hunting along the way. When I was a boy, I could tell you the name of every bird I heard in the yard from their song without seeing them because that was one of the things my father and I would quiz each other on while in the blind.

                    There are a lot of other options available other than emphasizing the importance of a successful harvest while hunting.

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                    • #11
                      No, i would do like my dad did with me. He shot a doe one day and didnt hit her that good so he came and got me and i finished her off. It was a good experiance for and a big confidence booster.

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                      • #12
                        I also agree with deer30 there is alot more to hunting than the kill. Some of my best memories are from camping out at our hunting club. Also keeping a journal of what you see in the field is a good way to keep kids interested.

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                        • #13
                          I agree with Ontario Honker, always tell the truth, unless you have Southern Food Cooking Empire worth millions.

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                          • #14
                            You asked, should you "give him/her the credit for a kill that you made without them knowing?". That doesn't describe a finishing shot; which may be acceptable.

                            The are other ways to keep a youngster's interest if they don't make the kill. They can help you clean it, and help carry it. Before the kill, they can be assigned to keep watch, carrying the binoculars, be shown game beds, nests, food, and other signs.

                            To me, pretending the child shot the game when they didn't, doesn't start things off on the right foot. And there's always the chance they'll know they didn't.

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                            • #15
                              When age is a factor I would most definatly give the youngster the kill. Theres nothing worse than coming home empty handed, no matter what age you are, it just makes you want to quit. At a young age it's easier to loose interest if you don't have something to show for it, so let 'em have it, at least you'll have a hunting buddy that will show up with a willing attitude toward hunting rather than feeling obligated.

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