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When squirrel hunting I try and wear neutral earth tone colors; browns, greens, etc. Do you think it makes a difference if you

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  • When squirrel hunting I try and wear neutral earth tone colors; browns, greens, etc. Do you think it makes a difference if you

    When squirrel hunting I try and wear neutral earth tone colors; browns, greens, etc. Do you think it makes a difference if you wear this or cammo? Of course during dear season I wear the hunter orange as required but have not noticed any difference in finding squirrels when wearing this. Any opinions one way or the other?

  • #2
    Camo helps, but the main thing is to learn to hold still...that's the hard part for me.

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    • #3
      I think deer can see your eye move, turkeys to.
      Sit still and if you do move, move very slowly. A rotating head is better than say an arm or upper body movement. Best thing is if you see game, wait till they look away to make a move.

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      • #4
        Just as Amflyer mentioned, hold still.
        I usually take a light-weight jacket along just in case I get spotted by the squirrel and I'm by myself.

        Whatever method you use, keep in mind that a hunted squirrel can remain motionless, and all but invisible, for hours at a time. If you find yourself searching fruitlessly for a squirrel that suddenly disappears, you can follow several courses of action.

        First, if there's any breeze, look for the movement of blowing fur rather than trying to spot the whole animal. Or if you're with a friend, one of you can sit still while the other circles the tree noisily, perhaps causing the squirrel to move around the trunk to keep the tree between it and the more obvious hunter. If alone, you can try hanging your jacket from a limb in view of the tree, then circling the trunk yourself. In fleeing you, the animal may think it's exposed itself to another hunter (the jacket), and scoot into your view. Or, finally, you can just plunk yourself down and try to wait the squirrel out. It might take awhile, but it will be worth the wait.

        I sometimes give it 45 minutes to an hour and do a spot and stalk, locating a squirrel that has retreated to the floor of the woods and try to squeeze one off while hiding behind large trees.

        Good Luck ozarkghost, keep us informed on how it goes.

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        • #5
          No need for camo. Just yesterday i stood perfectly still in blue jeans and a black jacket, and a squirrel ran right at me, stopped two foot away to chew on a nut, and ran off. I was in plain sight and he never knew i was there.

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          • #6
            I personally don't think it matters, Because when ever I go squirrel hunting i usually don't wear any camo because i think that they hear you rather than see you but good luck and happy hunting ozarkghost

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            • #7
              I don't place a heavy emphasis on camouflage clothing. I still wear a red plaid shirt or jacket, and I wear orange where legally required, but there are other issues I address. For example, I cover my face because I've learned what a "beacon" that can be. I wear a watchcap instead of my Stetson, because a broad-brimmed hat telegraphs or amplifies movement of the head.
              Black & white film, such as Tri-X or Ilford HP5, seems to have fallen by the wayside but, in the days when B&W film was common, red clothing, even orange, wasn't that glaringly obvious. Most nocturnal animal have monochromatic vision; they see in shades of gray.

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              • #8
                The Columbia ground squirrels we hunt in my area of Oregon are naturally wary, since they're near the bottom of the food chain and are heavily hunted by coyotes, raptors, and foxes. In fair weather, we simply wear jeans and comfortable clothing and pop away with anything from a .22 rimfire to a heavy centerfire varminter, and we don't concern ourselves with camouflage at all.

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                • #9
                  Where I hunt orange is required squirrel season or not. I do try and wear orange that is broken up with lines.

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                  • #10
                    I used to not wear camo and now I do and I think it helps.If you have it, wear it. If you don't, no need to go buy it.

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                    • #11
                      For squirrels, dark colors or camo doesn't really matter.

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                      • #12
                        Hi...


                        Camo is great...if you own stock in the company...!!


                        What counts is staying as quite as possible...and keeping your movements to an absolute minimum.


                        If you can't get that squirrel to move into sight when you know it's in a tree, just tap the tree with a rock, and it will move.

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                        • #13
                          It really doesn't matter if you have camo or not. Wear it if you have it but don't waste money to go buy camo for hunting. All that matters is that you stay quiet and do not move.

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                          • #14
                            When hunting squirrels alone I like to wear an orange hat. You can throw your hat on the other side of the tree and sometimes the squirrel will come around to your side and give you a shot. Doesn't work all the time, but every now and then.

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                            • #15
                              camo is good, earth tones work fine, key is being still and observant. Most squirrels will resume their activities after about 15-20 mins of you setting up

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